Real Estate & Retail

VIEWPOINT: The high cost of traffic Band-AidsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Adam Thies
According to the article titled "Traffic Transformation?" in the Oct. 15 IBJ, the Indiana Department of Transportation is working on a roughly $600 million plan to relieve traffic congestion in the area of interstates 465 and 69. Hold on a second! What is really broken here? I contend little to nothing. Yes, roadways need maintenance and upkeep, but these roadways operate just fine. Because this area is congested at the morning and evening rush hour, the perception exists that these...
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SoDo proposal faces stiff oddsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Cory Schouten
If Circle Centre mall were built today, it would cost $420 million. Throw in another $60 million, and you've got the price of Legends District-SoDo, a proposed mixed-use development on the south edge of downtown.
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Concert hall component would test demandRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Entertainment is a big part of a $480 million development proposed for the south side of downtown--plans include a 3,400-seat theater to attract the likes of Bruce Springsteen and first-run tours of Broadway shows such as "Wicked." The question is whether the city can support another midsize venue.
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West-side group promotes ethnic eateries: Will visitors see gems among strip malls?Restricted Content

November 12, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
The Lafayette Square neighborhood is known for its aging mall and the ongoing struggle to keep tenants there and in the surrounding sea of strip centers. But some advocates want to promote a success story: the demographic diversity that has given rise to a plethora of ethnic eateries in the area. Visitors who take a trip through some of the retail centers and outlots off West 38th Street can find the ubiquitous pizza, gyros and sushi-along with more unusual Ethiopian,...
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Glut of local golf courses puts squeeze on owners: Demand has never quite met expectationsRestricted Content

November 12, 2007
Michael Dabney
Tiger Woods, the world's No. 1 golfer, has been great for the sport. But he has not helped attract enough players to the game here and across the country to keep pace with the numbers who are stepping away because of age. That means many local golf course owners are closing the books on another tough season. Some area owners have seen the number of rounds played decline 40 percent since 2000. Golf course values here, meanwhile, have slid about...
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High-rise in works near canalRestricted Content

November 12, 2007
Cory Schouten
A strong demand for student housing downtown is driving a $40 million plan for a high-rise apartment tower a couple of blocks east of the Central Canal. The developer, a partnership of Fishers-based Paramount Realty Group and Indianapolis-based Alboher Development Co. Inc., hopes to build the 16-story Paramount Tower on a OneAmerica parking lot.
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Turf war unfolds in Babe Denny neighborhoodRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
Cory Schouten
A long-neglected neighborhood south of downtown called Babe Denny suddenly is in the spotlight, attracting attention from city planners, code enforcers, land speculators and a politically connected attorney.
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Now solo, VP set to expandRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
Cory Schouten
Convenience store stalwart Village Pantry has launched a $15 million plan to renovate 146 stores and is eyeing acquisitions that could double the chain's size in three years. The moves come as Village Pantry separates from parent Marsh Supermarkets Inc., a company that for years treated the convenience-store division as a redheaded stepchild.
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: It's time to use mass-appraisal model on state's homesRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
Mike Hicks
In the 10 years since Indiana's property-appraisal system was ruled unconstitutional, taxpayers have spent perhaps $1 billion to remedy the situation. That's more than $350 per household, and more than we spend on environmental protection each year. "Wowser" is the only printable exclamation I can muster. Among other things, Gov. Mitch Daniels' tax plan proposes the elimination of the township assessors (there are 1,008 offices statewide). According to a 2004 Chamber of Commerce study, streamlining the system would result in...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Smooth sailing for Simon, despite economic squall?Restricted Content

November 5, 2007
Greg Andrews
Retail pundits are trotting out all the downbeat analogies these days, as they fret that high gas prices and the slumping housing market will crimp consumer spending the rest of the year. As Carl Steidtmann, chief economist at Deloitte Research, put it, "The holiday season will be somewhat Grinch-like." So it may come as a surprise that some analysts are almost gushing about the prospects for Simon Property Group Inc., the nation's largest mall owner. As Rich Moore, managing director...
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Fast-growing WDG built on years of industry experience: Veteran of Kite, Lauth branches out on his ownRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
Scott Olson
For Mike Wyman, a devastating fire that gutted the family home during his teen-age years laid the foundation for a rewarding career in construction. The 41-year-old Wyman climbed from carpenter to become a leader of projects at two of the city's largest commercial developers before launching his own company in 2005. WDG Construction & Development Services Inc. on East Washington Street downtown has since grown into a firm that expects to top $30 million in revenue next year-double this year's...
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Sellers waiting for recovery in area housing market: Economist expects another nine months of 'slow going'Restricted Content

October 29, 2007
Michael Dabney
Melinda and Brooks Bertl know the ups and downs of the current real estate market-personally. They started looking for a home to buy this spring and it took them only two weeks to find one they liked in Carmel. "I guess we knew what we wanted and found it. And the house had been on the market for some time," said Melinda Bertl, indicating the sellers were ready to make a deal. They bought the house and moved into it....
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City fights property owners over value of land by stadiumRestricted Content

October 29, 2007
Cory Schouten
A legal fight is brewing over a 2.3-acre parking lot sandwiched between the RCA Dome and Lucas Oil Stadium. The state is seeking to acquire the property through eminent domain and is fighting an appraisal that puts its value at $7 million. The owners, meanwhile, contend the land is worth about twice as much.
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Bank's plans unclear after LaSalle buy: Bank of America unlikely to grow local retail biz, but lending office should stay, industry observers sayRestricted Content

October 29, 2007
Scott Olson
But here in Indianapolis, where LaSalle's lone location is a downtown commercial lending office, banking observers don't expect Bank of America retail outlets to follow. "I don't think [Indianapolis] will be a primary focus, at least not in the near term," said Tom Kersting, an Edward Jones analyst in St. Louis who follows the bank. "Their main purpose in making the purchase was getting the Chicago presence. That was the last major market they were lacking." Even so, observers say...
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Developer lures Whole Foods across street into Venu projectRestricted Content

October 29, 2007
Cory Schouten
The developer of a $750 million mixed-use project called Venu has acquired a 13-acre site across the street from where another developer had planned to build condos and a Whole Foods Market.
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White-collar crime has a new watchdog: Indiana securities commissioner aims to educate investors, enforce lawRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Madison native Chris Naylor on Oct. 5 became Indiana's securities commissioner. He was appointed by Indiana Secretary of State Todd Rokita to succeed O. Wayne Davis, who now is a semi-retired legal consultant. Naylor, former county prosecutor in two southern Indiana counties, sat down with IBJ to talk about his goals as the state's top securities cop. The following is an edited version of that interview. IBJ: What's your office's focus? NAYLOR: There are two large areas: investor protection and...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Everybody's busy playing the real estate blame gameRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Brian Mann
There's a game that takes place in most families with young children. You may be familiar with it. It's easy. Mom's cherished (insert any household item here) develops a large chip. Mom sees the chip. Mom begins the interrogation: Who did this? "Not me," says Johnny. and Wall Street. After all, they're the ones that loaned the money. It was too easy to get a loan, the critics say. People were buying homes and building developments with high-priced coffee shops...
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'Aggressive moves' feed Flaherty & Collins' growth: Local apartment developer gaining national footholdRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Cory Schouten
David Flaherty and Jerry Collins left comfortable vice president gigs at a local real estate firm to strike out on their own in 1993. Roughly two years passed before the two former Revel Cos. executives received another paycheck. But the gamble eventually paid off handsomely. Indianapolis-based Flaherty & Collins Properties has become a nationwide player in apartment housing, with a staff of 412, a development pipeline of $500 million, and more than 13,500 apartment units under management. Flaherty and Collins...
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Ex-Duke exec, wife tackle senior housing: Horns have nationwide plans for The Stratford Cos.Restricted Content

October 22, 2007
Scott Olson
Richard and Wendy Horn have had their share of separate real estate successes. Now, they've combined their corporate talents as a husband-and-wife team to lead an upstart senior housing developer. Richard joined The Stratford Cos. in May 2006 as chairman and CEO, and has since moved its headquarters from St. Louis to Indianapolis' north side in Parkwood Crossing. He is known within commercial real estate circles as a former veteran of Duke Realty Corp., where he enjoyed a two-year stint...
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Parkwood West sets pace for north-side office space: Duke project boasts upscale amenities, top-level rentRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Scott Olson
Duke Realty Corp.'s $125 million Parkwood West development well may be the new trendsetter for future office complexes along the burgeoning north-side Meridian Street corridor. One West, a five-story, 186,000-squarefoot Class A office building, is the first of three structures rising from the Parkwood West project at the northwest corner of Meridian and 96th streets. The upscale design as well as the added amenities that include a parking garage-rare in the suburban market-could become the rule instead of the exception....
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Indiana Court of Appeals reverses annexation decision:Restricted Content

October 22, 2007
Jennifer Mehalik
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed a trial court's decision in a northern Indiana annexation case, citing a recent ruling on the subject from the Indiana Supreme Court. In the case, In the Matter of the Annexation Proposed by Ordinance No. 2004-11-38, et al. v. Chris Fetcko, et al., 45A03-0611-CV-549, the city of Crown Point appealed the trial court's order granting the motion for involuntary dismissal filed by Fetcko and other remonstrators to a city ordinance annexing certain land. Crown...
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Dunkin' Donuts' expansion plans may create coffee clash: Chain could put damper on Starbucks' local growthRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Scott Olson
The return of Dunkin' Donuts to the metropolitan area last month gave java lovers here their first whiff of a brewing coffee war. The Boston-area-based chain's Carmel location is one of 80 franchised stores slated to open within the next eight years. Its re-entry into the market is part of a national campaign to more than double the number of its 6,000 locations by reinventing itself to challenge Seattle's Starbucks. Dunkin' Donuts is rolling out concept stores with hipper furniture...
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Pizza parlor, dog groomer among those going mobileRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Neighborhood Pizza, which operates out of the back of a souped-up box truck equipped with a pizza oven and other necessities, is among a growing number of startups that are hitting the road--literally.
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Ralston Square project would honor city's first plannerRestricted Content

October 8, 2007
Cory Schouten
A local development team is working on a 10-story, mixed-use tribute to a man who helped design the original plan for Indianapolis, Alexander Ralston. The $60 million project, dubbed Ralston Square, would feature a 150-room hotel, 55 condos, a 617-space parking garage and 41,000 square feet of retail space.
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Loss of institute may polarize Statehouse debate: Board considers shuttering respected government research organizationRestricted Content

October 8, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
If the Indiana Fiscal Policy Institute remains shuttered due to a lack of funds, the public won't notice immediately. After all, the Indianapolis-based organization focused on long-term analysis of complicated communal questions, such as how to equalize property taxes, diversify state pensions or finance public schools. But taxpayers eventually will feel the impact. For 20 years, the institute has played a key role in Statehouse debate, helping frame major issues with hard facts and figures that conservatives and liberals alike...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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