Renewable Energy

Contractors, manufacturers hope clean-energy incentives, mandates lead to more businessRestricted Content

August 10, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Federal stimulus funds and greenhouse-gas legislation have the potential to spark a green version of the Gold Rush. Many Indiana firms are retooling to sell products or services that are or might soon be in demand.
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Energy act will hurt Indiana's economy

August 3, 2009
A deeply concerning piece of legislation has just recently slipped through the [U.S.] House of Representatives. Although the American Clean Energy and Security Act has an appealing name and is created to improve our environment, in actuality, its passing through the Senate will cause dire problems for Hoosiers.
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General Assembly, governor bypass green reformsRestricted Content

June 1, 2009
Indiana environmental advocates had lots of disappointments this year regarding government reform efforts.
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Prepare for Indiana's low-carbon economyRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
Jesse Kharbanda
No doubt the transition to a low-carbon economy will bring great challenges for Hoosier businesses, given how carbon-intensive our society is. However, if we take proactive steps, Indiana can emerge as a standout success story.
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EPA policies cannot force economic choicesRestricted Content

May 11, 2009
Mike Hicks
We are at a critical moment in environmental policy. We suffer a dearth of frankness on the matter that imperils the quality of our decision-making.
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Project aims to make electric plug-in cars a realityRestricted Content

April 6, 2009
Chris O'Malley
A partnership of electric utilities and technology companies is intent on making Indianapolis the first city in the nation to test plug-in electrics on a mass scale, perhaps starting later this year.
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Ballard trip to explore clean energyRestricted Content

April 6, 2009
Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard and other city officials will travel to Brazil in May to explore renewable-energy production, in hopes of making the city a leader in the technology.
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Local company out to turn algae into fuel of futureRestricted Content

March 16, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Stellarwind is believed to be the first algae-oil company in Indiana and among dozens of others around the country at the forefront of what's being called the third wave of biofuels production.
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Green construction takes root in IndianaRestricted Content

March 9, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Six experts in green issues shared their outlook on businesses' environmental responsibilities during IBJ's Power Breakfast Feb. 13.
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Green bills sprout at StatehouseRestricted Content

January 12, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Legislation filed in the Indiana General Assembly this year seeks renewable energy mandates, stricter building codes throughout Indiana.
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Architect recognized for 'green' effortsRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
The U.S. Green Building Council recently honored local architect Bill Brown for his contributions to sustainable design and construction.
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Indiana Municipal Power Agency buys wind power from IowaRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
The Indiana Municipal Power Agency said it has agreed to buy up to 50 megawatts a year from Crystal Lake Wind Energy Center in Hancock County, Iowa.
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Bills would require utilities to reduce reliance on coalRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Chris O'Malley
Two bills in the Indiana Legislature would require utilities that operate here to supply up to 25 percent of their electricity from renewable resources such as wind, landfill gas, and plant and animal waste. Backers say utilities need more incentive to diversify from coal-based power generation.
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Utilities seek new sources of renewable electric powerRestricted Content

August 13, 2007
Chris O'Malley
The glacial-but-steady move to renewable-energy sources by Indiana's coal-dominated electric utilities is picking up speed and could spur demand for locally manufactured power-plant components.
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Bill would let utilities pass on more costs without rate hearingsRestricted Content

February 26, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Utility ratepayer groups say House Bill 1496, which is stuck in committee, is typical of what they see as a disturbing trend: allowing utilities to pass the cost of mandates directly to consumers. HB 1496 would require Indiana's coal-reliant electric utilities to generate at least 10 percent of their power from renewable energy sources like wind and landfill gas.
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  1. You are correct that Obamacare requires health insurance policies to include richer benefits and protects patients who get sick. That's what I was getting at when I wrote above, "That’s because Obamacare required insurers to take all customers, regardless of their health status, and also established a floor on how skimpy the benefits paid for by health plans could be." I think it's vital to know exactly how much the essential health benefits are costing over previous policies. Unless we know the cost of the law, we can't do a cost-benefit analysis. Taxes were raised in order to offset a 31% rise in health insurance premiums, an increase that paid for richer benefits. Are those richer benefits worth that much or not? That's the question we need to answer. This study at least gets us started on doing so.

  2. *5 employees per floor. Either way its ridiculous.

  3. Jim, thanks for always ready my stuff and providing thoughtful comments. I am sure that someone more familiar with research design and methods could take issue with Kowalski's study. I thought it was of considerable value, however, because so far we have been crediting Obamacare for all the gains in coverage and all price increases, neither of which is entirely fair. This is at least a rigorous attempt to sort things out. Maybe a quixotic attempt, but it's one of the first ones I've seen try to do it in a sophisticated way.

  4. In addition to rewriting history, the paper (or at least your summary of it) ignores that Obamacare policies now must provide "essential health benefits". Maybe Mr Wall has always been insured in a group plan but even group plans had holes you could drive a truck through, like the Colts defensive line last night. Individual plans were even worse. So, when you come up with a study that factors that in, let me know, otherwise the numbers are garbage.

  5. You guys are absolutely right: Cummins should build a massive 80-story high rise, and give each employee 5 floors. Or, I suppose they could always rent out the top floors if they wanted, since downtown office space is bursting at the seams (http://www.ibj.com/article?articleId=49481).

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