Retail

U.S. credit card info is easy pickings for hackers

December 22, 2013
Associated Press
Incidences like the recent data theft affecting 40 million Target customers could become more common as retailers, banks and credit card companies argue over who should pay for security upgrades.
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Sweet Things keeps same flavor with new ownerRestricted Content

December 26, 2009
Tawn Parent
Candy store on north side of Indianapolis changes hands, but new owner Cassandra Schuchman keeps chocolate recipe intact. The shop has stores at North Willow Mall and River Crossing.
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Elwood rock store expands inventoryRestricted Content

September 26, 2009
Marc D. Allan
Spencer Lapidary expands offerings to include stained glass and silver.
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New rail route connects Hendricks to West Coast: Line should bolster county's distribution industryRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Sam Stall
A new rail route launched last month between Los Angeles and CSX's Avon rail yard could give a further boost to Hendricks County's booming warehousing-and-distribution industry. The county already hosts some 29 million square feet of warehouse space. However, it lacked a direct connection to the teeming Port of Long Beach in Los Angeles, a major gateway for U.S./ Asian trade. Anyone in the Hendricks County area wishing to send or receive goods from that port by rail had to...
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Kite Realty goes on defensive: Local developer says stock sale should help it through tough timesRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Cory Schouten
Expecting a rocky 2009, locally based Kite Realty Group Trust sold nearly 5 million new shares in October to quickly raise almost $48 million in cash. The retail real estate investment trust saw its stock price tumble after the $10.55-per-share offering, from a close of $11.19 the day (Oct. 2) it announced the sale to $7.44 by Oct. 10. The deal dilutes existing shareholders, but company officials say it puts Kite in a stronger cash position to pay down debt...
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Surviving the season: Retail landlords worry that tight holiday budgets could doom some retailersRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Cory Schouten
Retailers usually get that Christmas-morning feeling of anticipation for the holiday shopping season. This year, many are just hoping to survive. As consumers tighten their spending to cope with higher prices and shrinking savings, stores big and small are feeling the pinch. Some stores, including Linens 'n Things, have filed for bankruptcy and plan to liquidate. Others, like Circuit City, still are fighting for survival. The holiday shopping season is looking more like a make-or-break period than the annual windfall-an...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Economic crisis explained, at lastRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Morton Marcus
I was uncomfortably challenged when Faye of the Forest landed on my deck a few days ago wanting to know what all these economic goings-on meant. "I'm responsible for teaching the elves," she said, "and I don't know what to tell them." "I don't know what to tell you," I said. "But here's what seems to me has happened." "Some people," I said, "are unable to make the payments on their mortgages. These mortgages are not held by the banks...
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Former rocker rolling along in pizza business: Puccini's founder has 13 locations and countingRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Sam Stall
For much of his adult life, Don Main was a rocker rather than a restaurateur. But fate-along with a pressing need to find a more profitable line of work-drove him to seek his fortune in a kitchen rather than onstage. Main, president and co-owner of Puccini's Smiling Teeth, began his peculiar career change back in 1990, after a decadeand-a-half stint as a professional-but not very well-paid-musician. At age 36, the bassist and lead vocalist for the band The Late Show...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: We may be in a recession, but don't expect calamityRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Mike Hicks
It will be some months before we know for sure, but I would wager today that the United States is in a recession. Our unemployment rate is at right about the 50-year average, productivity is up, and living standards never have been higher. Even so, the economy likely has been pushed into recession because uncertainty about credit will dramatically slow hiring and production the next few months. Demand for goods also will be affected. This is financial-market mayhem spreading to...
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Purdue professor cooks up healthier way to 'fry' food: Invention could make microwaves seem like crock potsRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Sam Stall
A new cooking technology under development at Purdue University could please both dieters looking for lowercalorie meals and food retailers seeking lower costs. It has the potential to produce "fried" foods using vastly less oil, and to cook them at speeds that make microwave ovens seem as slow as crock pots. A Purdue professor is working with Anderson Tool and Engineering Co. in Madison County to create advanced prototypes of the device, called a "radiant fryer." The first off the...
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Turmoil thrashes regional banks: As economy weakens, big local players fight to keep capital, customers' confidenceRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Cory Schouten
A rush of government-aided acquisitions has bestowed a too-big-to-fail halo over the likes of JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America and Citigroup. But what about the formidable regional banks that operate more than half the bank branches in the Indianapolis area? How stable are banks like National City, Huntington, Fifth Third, Key, M&I and Regions? Their shares have endured a rough ride on Wall Street, but there's little evidence the ups and downs reflect the true health of the institutions....
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EYE ON THE PIE: Crisis pits fairness against urgencyRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Morton Marcus
As these words are written, we do not know what Congress will decide to do about the mortgage mess. But it is clear folks are angry about the inequity of rescuing borrowers, lenders or traders with funding from the pockets of the innocent. Among the "villains" are home buyers who took on mortgages they could not afford. Also marked for sanctions are over-eager lenders, highly paid executives, and those who dealt in "innovative" financial products linked to mortgages. Those who...
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Simon Property Group exploring overseas marketsRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Cory Schouten

Simon Property Group Inc. has been readying its balance sheet and sizing up buyout targets in hopes of capitalizing on a worldwide markdown on shopping-center owners.


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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Auction-rate securities create nightmare for investorsRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Thomas A.
When a littleknown corner of the financial world hit a wall in February, auction-rate securities became an investor's worst nightmare. Auction-rate securities are long-term corporate or municipal bonds with interest rates that reset at periodic auctions. For years, the market for auction-rate securi ties operated smoothly. From 1984 through 2006, only 13 auction failures were recorded. Then, in February 2008, in the midst of a credit crunch, demand for auction-rate securities dried up, causing auctions to fail. Wall Street investment...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Veteran builder keeps faith, despite shortage of buyersRestricted Content

September 22, 2008
Greg Andrews
Paul Shoopman could have sat on the sidelines savoring the fact that he sold his homebuilding firm in 2004, just months before the market began a calamitous slide. But that's not Shoopman, who'd been building houses since 1971, the year he graduated from high school. His dad loaned him the money for his first lot, and co-signed for the construction loan. Shoopman built Dura Builders Inc. into Indianapolis' fifth-largest homebuilder before selling it to Los Angeles-based KB Home. A little...
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Hands-on strategy turns Mike's Carwash into industry modelRestricted Content

September 22, 2008
Sam Stall

Mike's Express Carwash makes money the old-fashioned way. The second-generation family affair, now celebrating its 60th year, has invested its reserves in steady expansion, becoming a model for the $23.4 billion industry in the process. And its owners still sweat the small stuff.


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Municipalities battle over township: Greenwood opposes Bargersville annexation plansRestricted Content

September 15, 2008
Chris O\'malley
BARGERSVILLE-This town of 2,500 has raised the ire of Greenwood leaders, daring to annex land close to the city's southern border and its sprawl of shopping centers. It's been a long time in coming-since 1905 or thereabouts. That's when the Illinois Central Railroad came through Bargersville, a burg created 55 years earlier in honor of local resident Jefferson Barger, and the heart of the town moved a half mile northwest to straddle the new tracks. These days, trains still rumble...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Cautious streak helps Duke weather tumultuous timesRestricted Content

September 15, 2008
Greg Andrews
Duke Realty Corp. has stayed largely out of the headlines this year, which in an economy like this is a pretty good sign. Another Indianapolis developer, Lauth Property Group, has shed more than half its 450-person work force, and Premier Properties Inc.- perhaps the city's most daring developer-lurched into bankruptcy court. Meanwhile, Duke, which specializes in suburban office and industrial development, keeps on chugging. To be sure, the company isn't immune to broader economic slowdown. In April, it laid off...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: Limp economy could slow increase in attorneys' feesRestricted Content

September 8, 2008
Greg Andrews
Attorney pay at top-tier firms is like compensation for executives of public companies. Amid hand-wringing, the numbers keep going up and up. The reasons are understandable. Law firm managers feel pressure to raise compensation to attract and retain the best attorneys-and to keep up with what other firms are doling out. The people running those competing firms feel the same pressures, accelerating the upward spiral. Hence, top attorneys in Indianapolis in the most complex practice areas now have hourly rates...
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ON THE RECORD:Restricted Content

September 8, 2008
O N T H E R E C O R D First Merchants Corp. of Muncie announced Sept. 3 that it has agreed to buy Lincoln Bancorp of Plainfield for about $75 million. The acquisition expands First Merchants' presence in the Indianapolis area from the northern suburbs into other fast-growing suburbs on the west and south sides. Announcement of the deal sparked a 37-percent runup in the value of Lincoln shares. Elanco, the animal-health division of Eli Lilly and Co.,...
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Leading Edge ready to expand its territory: South-side real estate player eyes regional growthRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Cory Schouten
The signs for Leading Edge Commercial Real Estate Services are hard to miss on the south side. And soon, they could be popping up all over central Indiana. The 3-year-old, Greenwood-based brokerage firm has grown from three employees to 14 and now is looking at adding two new offices, including one on the north side. The firm has more than 120 listings, up from about 60 at the start, mostly for office leasing and sales of smaller commercial properties. The...
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Small towns with a heart: Spurning sprawl, more towns upbeat on downtownRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Chris O\'malley
From Andy Griffith's Mayberry, the small town evolved into the likes of Avon, Ind. The tree-shaded bungalow on Oak Street within walking distance of the town center became the vinyl-clad, single-family home planted in a former cornfield with a contrived name ending in "creek" or "woods" or "farms." Residents have to jump in the car if they want to buy a cup of coffee or to patronize the predictable chain restaurants and bigbox retailers. The Best Buy on Avon's main...
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Nordstrom new north-side store targets tonier shoppersRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Gabrielle Poshadlo

Come Sept. 19, Nordstrom Inc.'s got a brand new bag--and, well, shoes, hat and ensemble to match--as the department store opens a second Indianapolis location, in the Fashion Mall at Keystone. Residing in Parisian's former quarters, the new store is poised to burnish the mall's reputation as the region's highest-end shopping destination.

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Strip centers feeling sting of housing market slump: Developers cutting back on new retail projectsRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Scott Olson
Those ubiquitous retail strip centers are beginning to wither under a housing slump that has cast a dark cloud over much of the U.S economy. Heavily dependent on new-home construction, strip-center developments have been hurt by tough residential real estate conditions that have spread into the commercial arena and dampened retail activity. Nationally, the volume of strip-center investment transactions is down 77 percent from a year ago, according to a June commercial report from the Chicago-based National Association of Realtors....
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Small towns with a heart: Spurning sprawl, more towns upbeat on downtownRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Chris O\'malley
From Andy Griffith's Mayberry, the small town evolved into the likes of Avon, Ind. The tree-shaded bungalow on Oak Street within walking distance of the town center became the vinyl-clad, single-family home planted in a former cornfield with a contrived name ending in "creek" or "woods" or "farms." Residents have to jump in the car if they want to buy a cup of coffee or to patronize the predictable chain restaurants and bigbox retailers. The Best Buy on Avon's main...
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  1. With Pence running the ship good luck with a new government building on the site. He does everything on the cheap except unnecessary roads line a new beltway( like we need that). Things like state of the art office buildings and light rail will never be seen as an asset to these types. They don't get that these are the things that help a city prosper.

  2. Does the $100,000,000,000 include salaries for members of Congress?

  3. "But that doesn't change how the piece plays to most of the people who will see it." If it stands out so little during the day as you seem to suggest maybe most of the people who actually see it will be those present when it is dark enough to experience its full effects.

  4. That's the mentality of most retail marketers. In this case Leo was asked to build the brand. HHG then had a bad sales quarter and rather than stay the course, now want to go back to the schlock that Zimmerman provides (at a considerable cut in price.) And while HHG salesmen are, by far, the pushiest salesmen I have ever experienced, I believe they are NOT paid on commission. But that doesn't mean they aren't trained to be aggressive.

  5. The reason HHG's sales team hits you from the moment you walk through the door is the same reason car salesmen do the same thing: Commission. HHG's folks are paid by commission they and need to hit sales targets or get cut, while BB does not. The sales figures are aggressive, so turnover rate is high. Electronics are the largest commission earners along with non-needed warranties, service plans etc, known in the industry as 'cheese'. The wholesale base price is listed on the cryptic price tag in the string of numbers near the bar code. Know how to decipher it and you get things at cost, with little to no commission to the sales persons. Whether or not this is fair, is more of a moral question than a financial one.

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