Ritter's Frozen Custard

Ritter's owners hope burgers will help fuel turnaroundRestricted Content

June 2, 2012
Sam Stall
Hoping to capitalize on the enduring appeal of Ritter's Frozen Custard, the chain's New York owners are launching another attempt to right-size the franchises with a new Indianapolis store, a revamped marketing plan, and burgers and fries.
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Ritter’s Frozen Custard franchisees reopening stores

January 25, 2011
Scott Olson
As a new owner revamps the Ritter's business plan, at least four of the frozen custard stands in the area have either opened or are set to reopen in the same locations where they previously operated.
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Ritter's buyer embarking on custard chain turnaround

May 12, 2010
Scott Olson
After purchasing the Franklin-based company two years ago, TruFoods says it now is positioned to seek franchisees in an attempt to grow the Ritter's chain to 100 locations within five years.
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Ritter's buyer retools custard chainRestricted Content

May 4, 2009
Sam Stall
Indianapolis residents have been passionate about Ritter's handmade frozen custard ever since it debuted almost two decades ago. But while the ice cream is sweet, the story of the former mom-and-pop company's attempts to morph into something grander is decidedly bitter. Now, New York-based TruFoods, which bought the company in May 2008, is trying to get the formula right.
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Ritter's sets new game planRestricted Content

November 26, 2007
Cory Schouten
The Indianapolis-based parent of the Ritter's Frozen Custard brand has been stuck in a cold streak lately, facing scores of new ice-cream competitors and a dwindling lineup of franchisees. But RFC Franchising LLC is planning big changes designed to firm up the home-grown chain, which now has 48 stores in nine states, down from more than 60 locations in 2005.
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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