School funding

Education cuts could be coming, state schools chief says

November 5, 2009
Associated Press
Indiana's school chief warned school superintendents Thursday that declining state revenues could force cuts in public education spending, education officials said.
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Beech Grove school referendum passes, two others fail

November 4, 2009
Voters in Beech Grove on Tuesday endorsed a tax increase to keep school buses operating, while other education-related measures in two Marion County townships failed.
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IPS was winner in state budgetRestricted Content

July 20, 2009
IBJ is completely off base to suggest that the new state budget was “balanced on the backs of poor children.” As has been true of every state budget for the last two decades, students in Indianapolis Public Schools and other urban districts are actually the biggest winners in this budget.
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EDITORIAL: School funding has fatal flawsRestricted Content

July 13, 2009
 IBJ Staff
A state budget was passed June 30, but it’s balanced on the backs of poor children. Legislators deserve praise for at least slightly increasing overall education funding, but because of a flawed funding formula, urban districts such as Indianapolis Public Schools actually will lose money in the next two years.
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Stimulus talk creates uncertainty at StatehouseRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
Ed Feigenbaum
Stimulus talk continues to dominate discussion at the Indiana Statehouse, creating indecision for lawmakers who were supposed to be devoting their full attention to assembling a two-year budget under difficult economic circumstances.
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  1. I'm a CPA who works with a wide range of companies (through my firm K.B.Parrish & Co.); however, we work with quite a few car dealerships, so I'm fairly interested in Fatwin (mentioned in the article). Does anyone have much information on that, or a link to such information? Thanks.

  2. Historically high long-term unemployment, unprecedented labor market slack and the loss of human capital should not be accepted as "the economy at work [and] what is supposed to happen" and is certainly not raising wages in Indiana. See Chicago Fed Reserve: goo.gl/IJ4JhQ Also, here's our research on Work Sharing and our support testimony at yesterday's hearing: goo.gl/NhC9W4

  3. I am always curious why teachers don't believe in accountability. It's the only profession in the world that things they are better than everyone else. It's really a shame.

  4. It's not often in Indiana that people from both major political parties and from both labor and business groups come together to endorse a proposal. I really think this is going to help create a more flexible labor force, which is what businesses claim to need, while also reducing outright layoffs, and mitigating the impact of salary/wage reductions, both of which have been highlighted as important issues affecting Hoosier workers. Like many other public policies, I'm sure that this one will, over time, be tweaked and changed as needed to meet Indiana's needs. But when you have such broad agreement, why not give this a try?

  5. I could not agree more with Ben's statement. Every time I look at my unemployment insurance rate, "irritated" hardly describes my sentiment. We are talking about a surplus of funds, and possibly refunding that, why, so we can say we did it and get a notch in our political belt? This is real money, to real companies, large and small. The impact is felt across the board; in the spending of the company, the hiring (or lack thereof due to higher insurance costs), as well as in the personal spending of the owners of a smaller company.

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