Small Business

Deal giving edge to unions muddies midfield contracts: Non-union contractors question whether bidding on project is worth the troubleRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Chris O\'malley
A construction agreement that requires union wages, work rules-and union workers-at the midfield terminal project has big and small businesses alike concerned they'll be shut out of all but the tiniest contracts on the $300 million building. Unless Janet South's painting firm Deco Group agrees to accept those terms, she'd only qualify for projects of $75,000 or less-the threshold at which the agreement kicks in. That limitation, contained in the project labor agreement attached to the midfield terminal, contrasts with...
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Special Report: Buying blind: Lack of oversight leaves state in dark on real estate deals The state of Indiana knows how much it's spending to lease property statewide -nearly $40 million a year. But it doesn't know if that's too much.Restricted Content

August 15, 2005
Tammy Lieber
The state of Indiana knows how much it's spending to lease property statewide -nearly $40 million a year. But it doesn't know if that's too much. State contracts for third-party real estate services give government officials few safeguards to ensure they're paying a fair price for office, laboratory and storage space outside of state-owned buildings, those in the industry say. And state administrators have no control over seven-figure commissions paid to two Indianapolis real estate brokers in the past decade,...
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Pottery by You: Firing up the entrepreneurial spirit Pottery shop owner puts love for art to workRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Susan Raccoli
Pottery shop owner puts love for art to work "Don't sell this place without telling me first," Katie Laux implored Pottery by You founder Liz Welter as they wielded brushes together late one night last fall. As they discussed the fun of owning a small business, Laux shared her enthusiasm for the paint-your-own pottery shop where she'd worked off and on since 2002. She loved the friendly atmosphere and the pleasant surprise when customers discovered their own creativity, and she...
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How well does your firm communicate with clients? MARKETING Kay Millar: Businesses that serve customers effectively offer a welcome reminder of how things ought to be handledRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
How well does your firm communicate with clients? MARKETING Kay Millar Businesses that serve customers effectively offer a welcome reminder of how things ought to be handled Having spent four months with my husband preparing one house to sell and another to move into, I'm sharing our observations on the behaviors of small businesses - using as examples our contractor, carpenter, electrician, painter, roofer and mason. Hopefully, this will help managers of other businesses review their own practices. Communication with...
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Researchers seek fuel-cell answers: Universities, companies see long-term potential in alternative power deviceRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Scott Olson
The figure-eight slot-car track in the basement laboratory at IUPUI looks out of place amid the expensive computer equipment surrounding it. But when research assistant Alan Benedict fumbles with a few wires and the cars come to life, it becomes clear the racetrack is more than just a toy. The miniature cars operate on fuel cells and are part of Purdue University's exploration into the alternative power source. Scientists across the country are studying the clean power alternative, stoked by...
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CIWBC director has worked in both the corporate and small-business worlds:Restricted Content

July 11, 2005
-Kathy Maeglin
If Sharon O'Donoghue isn't the most ideal person to run the Central Indiana Women's Business Center, she has to at least be in the top five. O'Donoghue's varied background, which includes working for a Fortune 500 company, as well as running a small business, is one of her primary assets. But her passion for helping women business owners identify and reach their goals is almost palpable when she talks-enthusiastically and endlessly-about what she's doing as director of the CIWBC. "I...
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Educating entrepreneurs: Women's Business Center offers basics as well as individual counseling servicesRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Kathy Maeglin
Joann Robinson was unhappy working in corporate America, so she started her own business, Balloons by Design, which delivers balloon bouquets and does on-site balloon decorations. The Indianapolis woman had been in business for about a year when she sought assistance in January from the new Central Indiana Women's Business Center. Since then, with CIWBC help, Robinson has gone from having about 15 customers to about 50. Robinson is one of many women who have benefited from the services offered...
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Growth in big supply at 3-year-old Milor: Entrepreneur taps experience to land big clientsRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
Michelle Taylor's first customer was a north-side hotel that ordered 3,000 janitorial gloves a month. She got up at 3 a.m., processed the order out of her garage, and delivered the gloves in her car. Less than three years later, Indianapolisbased Milor Supply Inc. delivers 36,000 gloves a month, plus janitorial equipment and supplies and safety equipment, to universities, city and state governments, hospitals and a host of other industries across the country. The 35-year-old black female entrepreneur has moved...
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Director leaves small-biz agency: Disagreement over host sponsor helped sway decisionRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Scott Olson
The head of the Central Indiana Small Business Development Center resigned this month following a rift over who might host the agency. Mary Jane Gonzalez, who came on board as executive director of the Central Indiana SBDC in July 2003, left to become director of business development at Mezzetta Construction Inc. Gonzalez's departure leaves the Central Indiana SBDC, where budding entrepreneurs can seek advice without paying high consulting fees, without a leader for the third time in roughly three years....
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Taking the pulse of life sciences: Experts weigh in on whether Indiana is keeping up in the economic development raceRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
IBJ: Is Indiana gaining ground against other states in the race to grow as a life sciences hub? What are some specific benchmarks that underscore your opinion? JOHNSON: Indiana is gaining ground, but Indiana already starts on really very substantial ground. There are a lot of outside validations of that and I think it's important for this audience to hear a couple of them because there is nothing like having people on the outside pay attention to what we're doing...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Until Indiana diversifies, economy will struggleRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Patrick Barkey
Sure, General Motors Corp. is in trouble, and quite a few Indiana communities are directly in harm's way. The headlines say it all. Plant closings-above and beyond those already planned-are on the way. GM bonds are rated as junk. Its market share is at an historic low. And it's discounting just about everything on the lot. For a company that has been the No. 1 automaker in the world for four generations, its recent stumbles have to be humbling. Pressed...
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Jester Promotions LLC: Keeping promotions on the cutting edge Advertising specialty firm also always on the lookout for inexpensive merchandiseRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Jo Ellen
Advertising specialty firm also always on the lookout for inexpensive merchandise Back in days of old, jesters were the eyes and ears of the power brokers. "They knew everything the king knew," said Rick Atkins, co-founder of Jester Promotions LLC, a specialty advertising company. That's the know-how Atkins said he brings to the table: up-to-the-minute knowledge about the latest trends in promotional activities and where his clients can get the best price for their items. He toyed with naming the...
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Long commute for former Lt. Gov.: Kathy Davis to lead South Bend tech firmRestricted Content

June 6, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Her days as lieutenant governor are finished, but it didn't take Kathy Davis long to find a new management role. She's accepted a job leading South Bend-based telecommunications connectivity provider Global Access Point. "After we lost [the election] and I knew I'd be looking for a job, I thought it would be ideal if I could find some entrepreneur who was very technical and needed some help on the management side," Davis said. "Then I was fortunate that opportunity came...
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HSAs picking up steam: Enrollment tops 1 million; biz tax breaks proposedRestricted Content

May 30, 2005
Scott Olson
Earlier this year, employees of Indianapolis-based N.K. Hurst Co. became part of the growing fraternity of workers in the United States who are eligible for health savings accounts as part of their benefits package. As of March, the membership in HSAs numbered more than 1 million people, twice as many as the estimated 438,000 in September, according to a study by America's Health Insurance Plans. The Washington, D.C.-based trade association for insurers said enrollment numbers are growing because more companies...
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Busy session for insurance forces: Compact passage highlights plethora of industry-related legislation considered by the General AssemblyRestricted Content

May 30, 2005
Tom Murphy
State lawmakers also killed a bill that offers "mandate lite" health coverage and kept the topic of vicious dogs at bay during the 2005 legislative session. Insurance lobbyists and regulators say they just wrapped up one of the busiest sessions in recent memory. Topics ran a wide gamut and crowded committee calendars. Last year, five industry-supported bills made it through the General Assembly, according to Dan Tollefson, corporate counsel for the state Department of Insurance. This year, 15 did, and...
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Tech fund set for overhaul: State shifts focus to commercial results; founders fear changes to peer-review processRestricted Content

May 30, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's showcase program for new technology development is about to be redesigned. Version 2.0 of the 21st Century Research and Technology Fund will direct more money to entrepreneurs. It will concentrate on projects whose commercial prospects are clear. And as it distributes $75 million of taxpayers' money over the next two years, it will expect a return on its investments. "The goal is, if a company does well, to get a return for the state," said Michael S. Maurer, president...
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Rule changes to get scrutiny: State agencies now must consider economic impactRestricted Content

May 30, 2005
Scott Olson
Indiana's small-business owners will encounter a friendlier regulatory environment in July, when sweeping legislation takes effect requiring state agencies to consider the impact of their policies on small businesses before adopting them. House Enrolled Act 1822 should help ease the burden of what advocates consider unnecessary regulations on small businesses by requiring agencies that intend to change or adopt a rule to provide an economic-impact statement first. The statement must include a regulatory-flexibility analysis that evaluates alternative methods that could...
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More than money: Inception puts emphasis on nurturing fledgling firmsRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Scott Olson
If money can't buy love, as the Beatles sang 40 years ago, neither can it make a startup company prosperous. While David Becker and David Doyle are no John Lennon or Paul McCartney, their wisdom certainly makes sense for locally based Inception LLC. That's the consultancy, incubator and venture capital firm they founded in November 2000. "Entrepreneurs always think that, if they had money, they would be successful [right away]," Doyle said. "That's not always the case. There are very...
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Experts see improving market: Higher occupancy rates, more construction projects mean good news for landlords, developersRestricted Content

April 25, 2005
IBJ: Is your sector of the construction or real estate industry better or worse off than a year ago and why? BURK: Overall, I think the Indianapolis office market is better off than it was a year ago. The occupancy rate for the 29-million-plus square feet of multitenant office properties in the market increased by about 2 percent last year, to 82.5 percent. There was positive net absorption of about 600,000 square feet, most of which occurred in the suburbs....
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New barter group begins: Rival files suit claiming execs stole trade secretsRestricted Content

April 25, 2005
Scott Olson
A new association offering business owners an opportunity to barter their services among a network of company members has arrived in the city, but not without a legal challenge from a competitor. Tony Sandlin and David Treacy founded Barter Indiana Group after working on a contractual basis at rival Henry Street Trading Co. The two barter organizations and another in the city, the Californiabased franchise BXI Exchange Inc., coordinate the exchange of services among members without involving cash. If a...
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Ergo Office Furniture LLC: Workers sit, ergo offices need furniture Retailer deals primarily in used desks and chairsRestricted Content

April 11, 2005
Ed Callahan
Businesses sometimes need office furniture immediately. That's one of the reasons Ergo Office Furniture has thrived. Ergo, at 2525 N. Shadeland Ave., sells, rents or leases office furniture to its customers. Though the company does carry some new furniture, and can order whatever it doesn't have, co-owner Mark S. Kemper said 70 percent of Ergo's revenue is in used furniture. The advantage of selling used furniture is that it's normally right there in the inventory. Brand-new furniture, in many cases,...
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Appnuity LLC: IT firm targets small businesses, not-for-profits Web-hosted services one of the company's fastest-growing areasRestricted Content

April 4, 2005
Della Pacheco
Appnuity founders David Eckel and Mark Castelli started their information technology business in 1999 specifically to serve this client base. They provide a wide array of personal-computer network solutions, Web site application development, Web-hosted services and structured cabling, which is determining the type of cabling needed to support current and future technology needs. The partners' skills complement each other. Eckel, 33, who is president and CEO, has experience as a network technician and sales consultant. Castelli, 34, is Appnuity's vice...
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Council launches new HR initiative: Target is small companies that have no administratorRestricted Content

March 28, 2005
Scott Olson
Small-business owners who need help wading through myriad human resources issues now have another source to consider-the Indianapolis Private Industry Council Inc. The 23-year-old IPIC, better known for overseeing the seven WorkOne career centers in Marion County, has leapt into the HR arena by partnering with a handful of professionals who have agreed to honor the agency's low-cost pledge. Sixty thousand people walk through the doors of the centers each year looking for work. But many of their potential employers-many...
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National lobbyist meets with gov: Small-business advocate says health care is still the toughest issue for ownersRestricted Content

March 28, 2005
Scott Olson
The National Federation of Independent Business is the nation's largest small-business advocacy group, representing 600,000 members in all 50 states. Its voice in Washington, D.C., is Dan Danner, an Ohio native and Purdue University graduate, who is the organization's lead lobbyist. During a recent visit to the NFIB's Indiana office, Danner sat down with IBJ to address issues critical to the state's smallbusiness owners. IBJ: As chief lobbyist for the NFIB, how do you get the organization's message to federal...
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Software-maker expands through public incentives: Exact Target must prepare for market's consolidationRestricted Content

March 28, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
It made for a great photo-op. With the morning sun shining brilliantly through the windows, Exact Target showed off its brand new headquarters in the Guaranty Building on Monument Circle. It was the second day of spring. Bipartisan smiles were the first item on the agenda. Gov. Mitch Daniels, a Republican, was there to celebrate the fast-growing e-mail software-maker's $1.14 million package of government incentives. So was Mayor Bart Peterson, a Democrat. Exact Target had earned its tax credits, abatements...
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  1. why oh why does this state continue to elect these people....do you wonder how much was graft out of the 3.8 billion?

  2. i too think this is a great idea. I think the vision and need is there as well. But also agree with Wendy that there may be better location in our city to fulfill this vision and help grow the sports of hockey and figure skating in Indy. Also to help further develop other parts of the city that seem often forgotten. Any of the other 6 townships out side of the three northernmost could benefit greatly from a facility and a vision like this. For a vision that sounds philanthropic, the location is appears more about the money. Would really like to see it elsewhere, but still wish the development the best of luck, as we can always use more ice in the city. As for the Ice growth when they return, if schedules can be coordinated with the Fuel, what could be better than to have high level hockey available to go see every weekend of the season? Good luck with the development and the return of the Ice.

  3. How many parking spaces do they have at Ironworks? Will residents have reserved spaces or will they have to troll for a space among the people that are there at Ruth Chris & Sangiovese?

  4. You do not get speeding ticket first time you speed and this is not first time Mr.Page has speed. One act should not define a man and this one act won't. He got off with a slap on the wrist. I agree with judge no person was injured by his actions. The state was robbed of money by paying too much rent for a building and that money could have been used for social services. The Page family maybe "generous" with their money but for most part all of it is dirty money that he obtained for sources that are not on the upright. Page is the kind of lawyer that gives lawyers a bad name. He paid off this judge like he has many other tine and walked away. Does he still have his license. I believe so. Hire him to get you confiscated drug money back. He will. It will cost you.

  5. I remain amazed at the level of expertise of the average Internet Television Executive. Obviously they have all the answers and know the business inside and out.

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