Small Business

Plainfield salon a family enterpriseRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
Amanda Getchel
Beth Metzger has talked about opening a salon and day spa with her daughter, Jill Dennis, for years.
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Tougher standards give Appel Heating and Air Conditioning a boostRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
Amanda Getchel
Business at Carmel-based Appel Heating and Air Conditioning isn't cooling off, despite the nation's economic woes. Revenue continues to increase as the industry becomes more environmentally friendly.
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Market owner: "Look into the future"Restricted Content

December 29, 2008
Sarah Layden
Georgetown Market has stayed in the health food game since 1973, in part because of owner Rick Montieth's ability to see down the road.
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Have a plan to motivate and keep key employeesRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
Eric Manterfield
The success of many closely held businesses is dependent on their key employees. These employees may not be family members and probably will never be owners of the business. Nevertheless, their efforts help increase the value of the business.
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Angie's List chief builds company, rebuilds Holy CrossRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
For several years, Angie's List CEO Bill Oesterle also has been quietly attempting to revitalize the near-east side.
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3M prepares launch of Hoosier startup's toothpasteRestricted Content

December 22, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
In January, St. Paul, Minn.-based 3M will release "Clinpro 5000," a specialty toothpaste Indiana Nanotech developed.
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U.S. Capitol Dome replica latest feat for Midwest Model MakersRestricted Content

December 15, 2008
Sam Stall
Indianapolis-based Midwest Model Makers has found big success by making very small objects — specifically, detailed architectural models of everything from buildings to golf courses to weapons systems.
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Franchises can be safer business investments in tough timesRestricted Content

December 15, 2008
Scott Olson
What is the current state of franchising, given the tough economic environment?
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Despite recession, small businesses support charityRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin
In the Indianapolis area, small-business owners told IBJ that they give in whatever way they can, and would like to continue as long as their finances allow. But a Chronicle of Philanthropy survey indicates that giving is already on the decline.
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Little Rox revisits '70s Pet Rocks fadRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
Whitney Lee
Little Rox offers 20 varieties of rocks, each tied to a character trait such as humility, honesty and tolerance, and sell online for $15 each.
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After a dozen years, Natural Stone Specialist growing seeks more commercial bizRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
Whitney Lee
Twelve years after opening Natural Stone Specialists, Laura Christy is still just as passionate about the Carmel-based business, which sells high-end stone, metal and glass tiles.
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To survive lean times ahead, small businesses must plan nowRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
David Clegg
Small businesses should plan for the worst while being attuned to what is happening in their industries, and to their customers.
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Teens not as eager to go it alone in bizRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
In its seventh annual "Teens and Entrepreneurship" poll, Junior Achievement has found that 13- to 18-year-olds are less interested in starting their own businesses than they were a year ago.
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Lean companies have best chance to surviveRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
Jean Wojtowicz
Make your business look as attractive as possible to your banker because you are competing for financing with other small businesses.
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Schott design firm builds office clients through real estate connectionsRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Scott Olson
Jenny Schott Androne, the president and founder of Schott Design Inc., one of the city's largest interior design firms, has amassed a diverse array of clients largely by marketing to building managers and landlords, as well as leasing agents and tenants.
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Turbulent times spell opportunity for small businessesRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
Connie Shepherd
Healthy banks have adopted stronger risk prevention measures for good reasons, but it's important to know that well-performing banks are still writing loans for small business and servicing their needs every day.
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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

  4. GOOD DAY to you I am Mr Howell Henry, a Reputable, Legitimate & an accredited money Lender. I loan money out to individuals in need of financial assistance. Do you have a bad credit or are you in need of money to pay bills? i want to use this medium to inform you that i render reliable beneficiary assistance as I'll be glad to offer you a loan at 2% interest rate to reliable individuals. Services Rendered include: *Refinance *Home Improvement *Inventor Loans *Auto Loans *Debt Consolidation *Horse Loans *Line of Credit *Second Mortgage *Business Loans *Personal Loans *International Loans. Please write back if interested. Upon Response, you'll be mailed a Loan application form to fill. (No social security and no credit check, 100% Guaranteed!) I Look forward permitting me to be of service to you. You can contact me via e-mail howellhenryloanfirm@gmail.com Yours Sincerely MR Howell Henry(MD)

  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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