Suburban growth

Northern suburbs see blitz of apartment construction

July 12, 2014
Andrea Muirragui Davis
Growing demand for high-end, low-maintenance living is fueling an apartment-building boom in Indianapolis’ northern suburbs—and raising concerns among some leaders about the risks of adding too much too fast.
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Indy Chamber proposes commuter taxRestricted Content

January 25, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
Indy Chamber is making the case for a commuter tax, arguing that it’s the best way to solve continual fiscal problems threatening to make Marion County, thus the whole metro area, less competitive.
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New U.S. 31 bypass around Kokomo nears opening

November 11, 2013
Associated Press
The opening of the new 13-mile stretch around Kokomo's east side will be a key step in the state's project to upgrade the most-congested sections of U.S. 31 between Indianapolis and South Bend.
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Plan for massive reservoir finding more support

April 24, 2013
Associated Press
Hundreds of residents gathered at Daleville High School on Tuesday night to hear about the proposed Mounds Lake Reservoir, a 2,100-acre project that could cost as much as $400 million to build.
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Mass transit campaign floods market with $1 millionRestricted Content

March 16, 2013
Chris O'Malley
The campaign to expand public transit in the region has generated a busload of money for some media and marketing outlets, thanks to $1 million in federal grants to advertise the benefits of mass transit.
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Transit plan may boost real estate investmentRestricted Content

December 17, 2011
Chris O'Malley
A proposed $1.3 billion transit system might bring redevelopment to urban neighborhoods. Yet transit proponents have surprisingly little to say about how much the system could generate in new real estate investment.
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MARCUS: Kokomo works to advance economy

July 10, 2010
Morton Marcus
What do you do when you have little discretionary money and enormous challenges? You might follow the example being set by Mayor Greg Goodnight in Kokomo.
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Recession temporarily slows suburban migration

June 23, 2010
Peter Schnitzler
Using U.S. Census data, the Indiana Business Research Center finds Indianapolis' population grew by 6,854 residents last year while Fishers, Noblesville, Carmel and Greenwood saw less-than-average gains.
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  1. Hiking blocks to an office after fighting traffic is not logical. Having office buildings around the loop, 465 and in cities in surrounding counties is logical. In other words, counties around Indianapolis need office buildings like Keystone, Meridian, Michigan Road/College Park and then no need to go downtown. Financial, legal, professional businesses don't need the downtown when Carmel, Fishers, North Indy are building their own central office buildings close to the professionals. The more Hamilton, Boone county attract professionals, the less downtown is relevant. Highrises have no meaning if they don't have adequate parking for professionals and clients. Great for show, but not exactly downtown Chicago, no lakefront, no river to speak of, and no view from highrises of lake Michigan and the magnificent mile. Indianapolis has no view.

  2. "The car count, THE SERIES, THE RACING, THE RATINGS, THE ATTENDANCE< AND THE MANAGEMENT, EVERY season is sub-par." ______________ You're welcome!

  3. that it actually looked a lot like Sato v Franchitti @Houston. And judging from Dario's marble mouthed presentation providing "color", I'd say that he still suffers from his Dallara inflicted head injury._______Considering that the Formula E cars weren't going that quickly at that exact moment, that was impressive air time. But I guess we shouldn't be surprised, as Dallara is the only car builder that needs an FAA certification for their cars. But flying Dallaras aren't new. Just ask Dan Wheldon.

  4. Does anyone know how and where I can get involved and included?

  5. While the data supporting the success of educating our preschoolers is significant, the method of reaching this age group should be multi-faceted. Getting business involved in support of early childhood education is needed. But the ways for businesses to be involved are not just giving money to programs and services. Corporations and businesses educating their own workforce in the importance of sending a child to kindergarten prepared to learn is an alternative way that needs to be addressed. Helping parents prepare their children for school and be involved is a proven method for success. However, many parents are not sure how to help their children. The public is often led to think that preschool education happens only in schools, daycare, or learning centers but parents and other family members along with pediatricians, librarians, museums, etc. are valuable resources in educating our youngsters. When parents are informed through work lunch hour workshops in educating a young child, website exposure to exceptional teaching ideas that illustrate how to encourage learning for fun, media input, and directed community focus on early childhood that is when a difference will be seen. As a society we all need to look outside the normal paths of educating and reaching preschoolers. It is when methods of involving the most important adult in a child's life - a parent, that real success in educating our future workers will occur. The website www.ifnotyouwho.org is free and illustrates activities that are research-based, easy to follow and fun! Businesses should be encouraging their workers to tackle this issue and this website makes it easy for parents to be involved. The focus of preschool education should be to inspire all the adults in a preschooler's life to be aware of what they can do to prepare a child for their future life. Fortunately we now know best practices to prepare a child for a successful start to school. Is the business community ready to be involved in educating preschoolers when it becomes more than a donation but a challenge to their own workers?

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