Succession

Herb Simon: $160M Pacer deal helps heirsRestricted Content

April 26, 2014
Herb Simon, 79, says the $160 million deal the city struck with the Indiana Pacers this month for operating costs and stadium improvements is an outgrowth of negotiations that began way back in 2007.
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Irsay arrest spurs talk of Colts succession planRestricted Content

March 22, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay gave a clear signal in 2012 about his long-term succession plan by naming his three daughters vice chairwomen and co-owners. His March 16 arrest might hasten the launch of that plan, or at the very least give Colts fans a glimpse of what it will look like.
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Arts groups run by founders lay groundwork for next generationRestricted Content

March 3, 2012
Kathleen McLaughlin
Succession planning is critical for any organization but even more so when the person making the hand-off is the creator and driving force, and several local arts groups are still led by their founders.
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Great-grandson of LDI's founder prepares to take reinsRestricted Content

January 7, 2012
Kathleen McLaughlin
In a world that likes to see businesses grow by leaps and bounds, LDI Ltd. is a tortoise. The family-owned holding company typically hangs onto firms in its portfolio for 15 years or more. It might take more than two years to zero in on an acquisition target. And it’s putting its next CEO, J.A. Lacy, through a year-long apprenticeship.
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Much unknown about new Cook Group CEO

April 22, 2011
Scott Olson
Carl Cook has been tabbed to replace his father, Bill Cook, who died a week ago. But many in the Bloomington business community know little about him, which reflects the company's strict privacy policy.
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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