Super Bowl

Indy scores 2012 Super BowlRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
In May, Indianapolis narrowly won the right to host the 2012 Super Bowl, beating out Phoenix and Houston at the National Football League owners' meeting in Atlanta.
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Sports veteran picked to plan Indianapolis Super BowlRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
The woman chosen as CEO of the city's Super Bowl host committee isn't exactly a household name, but those who hired her think she'll make Indianapolis the best host city ever.
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Super Bowl group hires Sports Corp. official as CEORestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

The woman chosen as president and CEO of the city's Super Bowl host committee isn't exactly a household name, but those who hired her think she'll make Indianapolis the best host city ever. Allison Melangton, 46, is the first paid member of the 2012 Indianapolis Super Bowl Host Committee, and is expected to throw planning and organization into overdrive over the next 30 days.


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Super Bowl bid committee solicits input through Web siteRestricted Content

April 7, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
The city's 2012 Super Bowl bid committee set up a Web site, www.our2012sb.com, in mid-February to encourage input from the community--adopting a more inclusive approach than organizers did last year when bidding on the 2011 game.
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Colts win Super Bowl; city loses bid to hostRestricted Content

December 31, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
Despite a mammoth effort by city leaders, which included raising $25 million from the corporate community, Indianapolis lost to Dallas the right to host the 2011 Super Bowl.
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Super rebuff builds pressure to attract even more eventsRestricted Content

June 4, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
With the 2011 Super Bowl galloping off to Dallas, pressure is building to bring in more of the marquee sports events the city's economy has come to rely on to keep hotels full, retail businesses humming and the national and international spotlight focused on Indianapolis.
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Pledge blitz buoys Bowl bidRestricted Content

March 19, 2007
Andrea Muirragui Davis
The team leading Indianapolis' bid to host the 2011 Super Bowl is calling on the corporate community to get in the game fast. More than a dozen business leaders are rushing to raise $25 million before May 23, when NFL owners are expected to select a host city from hopefuls Indianapolis; Dallas; and Glendale, Ariz.
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Colts seize Super moment for marketingRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
With a season-ticket waiting list of more than 13,000--and growing by the hour--the Indianapolis Colts marketing team can settle into cruise control, right? Owner Jim Irsay thinks not.
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Super Bowl win not necessarily profitableRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
If the Indianapolis Colts win the Super Bowl Feb. 4, team owner Jim Irsay will be going deep into his pocket. Contrary to popular belief, winning the Super Bowl is not a huge financial windfall--at least not in the near term for the team and its owner.
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Super Bowl travel plans mix business, funRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Cory Schouten
Super Bowl XLI has become a can't-miss event for dozens of local business executives and government honchos, who are shelling out several thousand dollars apiece to watch the Feb. 4 game in person.
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Sympathy for New Orleans may ruin Indy's Super Bowl bidRestricted Content

November 27, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
The stiff competition facing Indianapolis' bid for the 2011 Super Bowl just got stiffer. Besides Glendale, Ariz., and Dallas, New Orleans officials have told NFL officials and team owners they want to host the championship game again as part of the city's recovery from Hurricane Katrina.
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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

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  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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