Technology

Emmis' landmark deal with Apple paying big dividends: Locally based radio group now No. 2 iTunes affiliateRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Emmis Communications Corp. has a new mantra when it comes to emerging technology some say will kill the radio industry: If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Emmis entered a relationship with California-based Apple Computer Inc. nine months ago that is paying big dividends. Since launching one of the radio industry's first iTunes storefronts on its stations' Internet sites, Emmis officials said they have become the No. 2 iTunes affiliate based on sales. Only Internet behemoth Yahoo Music sells more....
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Techies push for education initiatives: Daniels administration trying to heed call to build a better-equipped work force with 'Accelerating Growth' planRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
The numbers are daunting. According to Gov. Mitch Daniels' economic development plan "Accelerating Growth," Indiana ranks 35th out of 50 states for the proportion of its population with at least an associate's degree. Worse, it ranks 47th for bachelor's degrees. A full million Hoosiers "lack the basic skills necessary for 21st century employment," according to the plan. That's about a sixth of the state's population. High-tech leaders are increasingly focused on reversing the trend. They know the availability of a...
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Merger would consolidate technology initiatives under CICPRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Technology advocate Techpoint is considering merging into the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership--a move that would leave CICP CEO Mark Miles atop all three of Indiana's major business-development initiatives.
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Big screen? Two screens? Productivity debate goes onRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Tim Altom
Apple computer recently announced the results of a study by Paris-based Andreas Pfeiffer, which said buying one of Apple's $1,999, 30-inch displays would increase productivity of one lucky employee 50 percent to 65 percent, enough to earn back the cost of the monitor before it dies or is supplanted by one with more pizazz a few years from now. Pfeiffer argues that it takes a lot of time to switch between windows on a smaller monitor, time that isn't taken...
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Lights, camera, Internet-More Web sites using video: Vodcast clips catching on as a way for organizations to deliver their message in a new, more exciting wayRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Scott Olson
The terms for emerging Internet technology are enough to make the less savvy long for the days when e-mail seemed cutting-edge. The communication tool, especially among teens, has given way to instant messaging, of course. So it's no wonder colleges and companies alike are starting to shun standard e- mail and Web-page marketing efforts in favor of video-on-demand clips, known as vodcasts. "The computer was meant to be watched; it wasn't meant to be read," said Jon DiGregory, who founded...
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Techpoint's new leader sees room to grow: Indiana making progress, but could do better, he saysRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Scott Olson
Techpoint, a locally based technology trade group that represents the interests of about 330 members statewide, is undergoing a transition in leadership. Jim Jay, 37, has been named interim CEO following the resignation of Cameron Carter, who has led the organization since 2003. Directors should begin a formal search for a permanent replacement the first of the year. Whether Jay lands the top job remains to be seen. But in the meantime, the Butler University graduate with an entrepreneurial spirit...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Our technology woes begin in grade schoolRestricted Content

November 13, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Those of us who work for universities soon become acquainted with the concept of tenure, which is a status typically conferred upon those of faculty rank who have demonstrated to their colleagues the ability to teach and conduct research to a high standard. Those who achieve tenured status are more free to speak their minds about controversial issues, since it is much more difficult for their superiors to terminate or dismiss them without just cause. The words penned in this...
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Green roofs slow to take root in Indianapolis area: Despite an array of environmental and other benefits, initial costs and lack of incentives put lid on their useRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Jo Ellen
Green roofs color the skylines in Chicago, Philadelphia, Toronto and other North American cities, but Hoosiers have to look high and low to find similar examples of the plant-filled building tops in Indianapolis. "Most green roofs [in other cities] are on the tops of existing buildings, where here they are [more likely to be found] above an underground parking garage that you might not even be aware is there," said Mark Zelonis, director of the gardens and grounds at the...
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Former Lt. Gov. Davis seeks support for Model IndianaRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Former Lt. Gov. Kathy Davis is attempting to build a virtual version of Indiana for policymakers to wander. If successful, the new IT system could help shape Statehouse debate on a host of subjects.
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Bringing answers to Indianapolis from around the globeRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Thaddeus S.
Why should you care how many stamps your architect has in his or her passport? Or whom your architect talks to from around the world? Because, as national publications declare design to be the new driving force in the marketplace, and as that marketplace becomes increasingly global, your architect can offer you a conduit to the people and ideas that will make a difference in your business in the years ahead. Indianapolis-area architects already are working to bring the world...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Recipe for a great university presidentRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
And in the almost 20 years since John Ryan? None of the three presidents hired by IU's trustees have had any apparent connection to IU or the state. The IU marketing machine will churn out plenty of evidence, most of it legitimate, that those three-Thomas Ehrlich, Myles Brand and Adam Herbert-enjoyed successful tenures, but public perception says otherwise. IU isn't alone in turning its back on internal candidates. R. William Funk, one of the foremost university president headhunters, said only...
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BULLS & BEARS: Investors: Stay within 'circle of competence'Restricted Content

September 25, 2006
Ken Skarbeck
Index funds are a wise choice for many investors confronted with the overwhelming menu of investment options. They offer a simple alternative that exposes the investor to a variety of industries at a low cost. In addition, an index fund investor's return will exceed the net results, after fees and expenses, achieved by the majority of investment professionals, including most mutual fund and hedge fund managers. If, however, investors choose to build their portfolio by selecting individual stocks, they should...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: High gasoline prices sometimes difficult to understandRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Paul E.
Just who or what is it that sets the price for a gallon of gas? Well, gasoline station owners of course. Whether it's a momand-pop station or part of a large chain, the owner looks at prices up and down the street and changes the signs accordingly. These owners know what everybody else around them is charging, and they also know what their supplier is charging them for their wholesale supply. What about the wholesale price? Its set in a...
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Preparation is key to surviving disasters of all kinds: Financial experts offer tips to keep your records safe in emergenciesRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
Last year's hurricane disasters in the Gulf Coast region brought to light how easily and quickly personal financial records can be lost or destroyed in a catastrophe. While hurricanes aren't likely to hit Indiana, tornadoes, fires and floods are always a possibility, as are crimes such as theft, vandalism and identity theft. Financial planners emphasize that it's important to keep records safe from various disasters that can hit without warning. In fact, they say, it's good to have a plan...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: Our dead deserve better than thisRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Forget coming late to the daylightsaving time party. Even higher on the list of things we Hoosiers should be embarrassed about is our coroner system. Of course, embarrassment isn't the half of it. More troubling is that we elect and counties pay coroners who need no qualifications whatsoever, other than being adults and living in the county where they're elected. (Their day jobs range from truck driver to boat pilot.) Worst of all is the hindrance these underqualified officials can...
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Fewer businesses splurging for employee relocation costs: Perk is more prevalent, though, when attempting to attract high-level executivesRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Scott Olson
Paying closing costs on a home or, better yet, asking that a potential employer purchase the house itself are among the brashest requests she's fielded. Yet the owner of Quiring Associates Inc. expressed some surprise when the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota arranged to move her daughter, a recent Purdue University graduate embarking on her first job no less. "They brought a huge van down to pick up her things," Quiring said. "They actually wanted her to know how serious they...
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Medical device startup aims for animal market: QuadraSpec raises another $3.9M from investorsRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Fast-growing West Lafayette-based medical-device maker QuadraSpec Inc. announced this month that it raised $3.9 million in venture capital from a syndicate of investors. For a 2-year-old Hoosier startup, that's a jackpot. But CEO Chad Barden is already searching for more. "You have to start on it right away," he said. "Now it's easier to get an audience, but the diligence is no less strenuous." Since forming in 2004, QuadraSpec has attracted $8.1 million, including multiple grants from the Indiana 21st...
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Hammering away at his own business: After 18 years working for others, contractor strikes out on his ownRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Jo Ellen
Built to Last Construction Hammering away at his own business After 18 years working for others, contractor strikes out on his own Bradley Ford is a true, hands-on owner. "I really like working with my hands. I couldn't stand working behind a desk," said Ford, 40, who founded Built To Last Construction in 2000. Starting the business was the culmination of a career path he started in 1982 as a 16-year-old student at Perry Meridian High School and the building...
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Small biz struggles in big-biz computer world RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY Tim Altom:Restricted Content

September 18, 2006
It's true that the rich get richer, although the rich have often learned to portray the burden on the little guy as inevitable and desirable progress. For evidence, look no further than Microsoft Office. It's written for the Fortune 500, not for microbusinesses. Office has long been criticized as a bloated monstrosity, full of obscure features that only big corporations with time on their hands ever figure out how to use. Office products have their own programming language you can...
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TOM HARTON Commentary: Crime takes indirect swipe at the artsRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
In Indianapolis, when the crime rate goes up or kids' test scores go down, it's not uncommon for people to point the finger at publicly funded sports facilities. "Our priorities are screwed up," observers opine. "We spend too much money on these playgrounds for the rich, and not enough on cops, courts and public education." The sports establishment here has been batting away this criticism for years. It goes with the territory in a city where sports is an important...
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Product gives Thomson better hand: New micro-camcorder boosts prospects for unit French parent wants to dealRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Thomson's latest product is a lot like the French company's presence in Carmel, these days. Small, and getting ever smaller. With half the number of employees it had in the late-1990s, Thomson's Americas unit here is about to be downsized yet again from its current 900-some jobs-but not before enjoying a bit of a surprise hit in a palm-size, under-$130 camcorder. The success of the Small Wonder camera-and a slicker new version due out this fall-could help frame the future...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Productivity is going up, but what's the cause?Restricted Content

September 11, 2006
Patrick Barkey
It's all quite clear as economists draw it up on their blackboards. Growth in productivity-defined as the output produced per person-hour of labor-is what ultimately allows us all to enjoy a higher standard of living. When we collectively produce more, we earn more. Or, to put it another way, we can afford to pay ourselves more without provoking inflation. And since the midpoint of the last decade, the measures of economy-wide productivity produced by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics...
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PAN founder focuses on another IT venture: BubbleUp aims to standardize musicians' Web sitesRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It didn't take David Pfenninger long to get back into the game. Just months after selling Carmel-based Internet-test provider Performance Assessment Network Inc. in April for $75 million to St. Louis-based TALX Corp., Pfenninger is betting on another Internet venture: an online music marketing and management startup called BubbleUp. Pfenninger initially remained part of PAN's local management team after the acquisition, but stepped down this summer, retaining a role as a consultant. "I thought it was time to make a...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Laptop deal-breaker depends on reliabilityRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Tim Altom
I've been scanning laptop buyer's guides lately, and I have to say that many magazine test labs seem utterly out of touch with business users. They extol the big screens, fast multimedia and other capabilities business users just don't care about. They act as if weight is a big factor for those of us who have to cart our hightech symbiotes around with us, but laptops long ago dropped below that critical barrier. Hewlett-Packard had a little notebook unit in...
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Persistence pays for Interactive IntelligenceRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Interactive Intelligence Inc. has been on a wild ride since its initial public offering seven years ago. The communications software maker saw its shares shoot as high as $50 its first few months of trading, only to have them wallow below $5 for years after the tech bubble burst. But now the company is back in favor on Wall Street.
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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