Technology

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: High gasoline prices sometimes difficult to understandRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Paul E.
Just who or what is it that sets the price for a gallon of gas? Well, gasoline station owners of course. Whether it's a momand-pop station or part of a large chain, the owner looks at prices up and down the street and changes the signs accordingly. These owners know what everybody else around them is charging, and they also know what their supplier is charging them for their wholesale supply. What about the wholesale price? Its set in a...
More

Preparation is key to surviving disasters of all kinds: Financial experts offer tips to keep your records safe in emergenciesRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
Last year's hurricane disasters in the Gulf Coast region brought to light how easily and quickly personal financial records can be lost or destroyed in a catastrophe. While hurricanes aren't likely to hit Indiana, tornadoes, fires and floods are always a possibility, as are crimes such as theft, vandalism and identity theft. Financial planners emphasize that it's important to keep records safe from various disasters that can hit without warning. In fact, they say, it's good to have a plan...
More

TAWN PARENT Commentary: Our dead deserve better than thisRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Forget coming late to the daylightsaving time party. Even higher on the list of things we Hoosiers should be embarrassed about is our coroner system. Of course, embarrassment isn't the half of it. More troubling is that we elect and counties pay coroners who need no qualifications whatsoever, other than being adults and living in the county where they're elected. (Their day jobs range from truck driver to boat pilot.) Worst of all is the hindrance these underqualified officials can...
More

Fewer businesses splurging for employee relocation costs: Perk is more prevalent, though, when attempting to attract high-level executivesRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Scott Olson
Paying closing costs on a home or, better yet, asking that a potential employer purchase the house itself are among the brashest requests she's fielded. Yet the owner of Quiring Associates Inc. expressed some surprise when the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota arranged to move her daughter, a recent Purdue University graduate embarking on her first job no less. "They brought a huge van down to pick up her things," Quiring said. "They actually wanted her to know how serious they...
More

Medical device startup aims for animal market: QuadraSpec raises another $3.9M from investorsRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Fast-growing West Lafayette-based medical-device maker QuadraSpec Inc. announced this month that it raised $3.9 million in venture capital from a syndicate of investors. For a 2-year-old Hoosier startup, that's a jackpot. But CEO Chad Barden is already searching for more. "You have to start on it right away," he said. "Now it's easier to get an audience, but the diligence is no less strenuous." Since forming in 2004, QuadraSpec has attracted $8.1 million, including multiple grants from the Indiana 21st...
More

Hammering away at his own business: After 18 years working for others, contractor strikes out on his ownRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Jo Ellen
Built to Last Construction Hammering away at his own business After 18 years working for others, contractor strikes out on his own Bradley Ford is a true, hands-on owner. "I really like working with my hands. I couldn't stand working behind a desk," said Ford, 40, who founded Built To Last Construction in 2000. Starting the business was the culmination of a career path he started in 1982 as a 16-year-old student at Perry Meridian High School and the building...
More

Small biz struggles in big-biz computer world RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY Tim Altom:Restricted Content

September 18, 2006
It's true that the rich get richer, although the rich have often learned to portray the burden on the little guy as inevitable and desirable progress. For evidence, look no further than Microsoft Office. It's written for the Fortune 500, not for microbusinesses. Office has long been criticized as a bloated monstrosity, full of obscure features that only big corporations with time on their hands ever figure out how to use. Office products have their own programming language you can...
More

TOM HARTON Commentary: Crime takes indirect swipe at the artsRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
In Indianapolis, when the crime rate goes up or kids' test scores go down, it's not uncommon for people to point the finger at publicly funded sports facilities. "Our priorities are screwed up," observers opine. "We spend too much money on these playgrounds for the rich, and not enough on cops, courts and public education." The sports establishment here has been batting away this criticism for years. It goes with the territory in a city where sports is an important...
More

Product gives Thomson better hand: New micro-camcorder boosts prospects for unit French parent wants to dealRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Thomson's latest product is a lot like the French company's presence in Carmel, these days. Small, and getting ever smaller. With half the number of employees it had in the late-1990s, Thomson's Americas unit here is about to be downsized yet again from its current 900-some jobs-but not before enjoying a bit of a surprise hit in a palm-size, under-$130 camcorder. The success of the Small Wonder camera-and a slicker new version due out this fall-could help frame the future...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Productivity is going up, but what's the cause?Restricted Content

September 11, 2006
Patrick Barkey
It's all quite clear as economists draw it up on their blackboards. Growth in productivity-defined as the output produced per person-hour of labor-is what ultimately allows us all to enjoy a higher standard of living. When we collectively produce more, we earn more. Or, to put it another way, we can afford to pay ourselves more without provoking inflation. And since the midpoint of the last decade, the measures of economy-wide productivity produced by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics...
More

PAN founder focuses on another IT venture: BubbleUp aims to standardize musicians' Web sitesRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It didn't take David Pfenninger long to get back into the game. Just months after selling Carmel-based Internet-test provider Performance Assessment Network Inc. in April for $75 million to St. Louis-based TALX Corp., Pfenninger is betting on another Internet venture: an online music marketing and management startup called BubbleUp. Pfenninger initially remained part of PAN's local management team after the acquisition, but stepped down this summer, retaining a role as a consultant. "I thought it was time to make a...
More

RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Laptop deal-breaker depends on reliabilityRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Tim Altom
I've been scanning laptop buyer's guides lately, and I have to say that many magazine test labs seem utterly out of touch with business users. They extol the big screens, fast multimedia and other capabilities business users just don't care about. They act as if weight is a big factor for those of us who have to cart our hightech symbiotes around with us, but laptops long ago dropped below that critical barrier. Hewlett-Packard had a little notebook unit in...
More

Persistence pays for Interactive IntelligenceRestricted Content

September 4, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Interactive Intelligence Inc. has been on a wild ride since its initial public offering seven years ago. The communications software maker saw its shares shoot as high as $50 its first few months of trading, only to have them wallow below $5 for years after the tech bubble burst. But now the company is back in favor on Wall Street.
More

Racing toward a new type of learning center: Decatur, Panther team up on educational facilityRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Scott Olson
Mention a career in motorsports to most youngsters and they imagine whizzing around the track like NASCAR's Tony Stewart or Sam Hornish Jr., points leader of the Indianapolis Racing League. But a partnership between Indianapolisbased Panther Racing LLC and Decatur Township Schools wants to introduce students to more practical professions within the sport by providing the resources in a hands-on learning environment. The result is the Panther Education Center, set to open next fall near the racing team's headquarters at...
More

25A-32A All in the family: Good relationships key to living and working togetherRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Tammy Lieber
25A-32A All in the family Good relationships key to living and working together The family that plays together stays together, as the old adage goes. But what about the family that works together? Many-if not most-of the estimated 450,000 small businesses in Indiana employ more than one family member, local smallbusiness experts say. In some cases, family involvement might be limited to a spouse who helps out with the books part-time or a child who comes into the office occasionally...
More

BEHIND THE NEWS: After CFO's jump to rival, Emmis opts to fight backRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Greg Andrews
When Emmis Communications Corp. Chief Financial Officer Walter Berger bolted in January for the same post at CBS Radio in New York, the Indianapolis company said little publicly. But it's now apparent Emmis officials were more than a little peeved. In recent weeks, they've filed an arbitration case against Berger in hopes of recouping some of his compensation, and they've sued CBS alleging tortuous interference with his contract. "I think this case is very clear-cut," said David Barrett, vice president...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Businesses should tap Indiana's 'invisible work force'Restricted Content

August 28, 2006
Greg Johnson
Based on an analysis of biographical accounts, both Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison appear to have been challenged by dyslexia, a reading and comprehension developmental disorder that can be severe. Few today would question the astonishing contributions these individuals made to humanity. Despite the severity of the challenges that some of these children face, many adapt and conquer, entering the Indianapolis community as successful working adults. There are many stories of achievement about children exceeding expectations, from a teenager with...
More

IEDC shelves proposal to copy Ohio initiative: Program matches promising startups with capitalRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
An Ohio program launched in 2003 to urge development of extremely earlystage companies has already spurred investments worth $239 million in 68 Buckeye startups. Venture capitalists would like to duplicate the program here. But their proposal has been languishing at the Indiana Economic Development Corp. for a month. "We have the application. We haven't done anything with it," said IEDC Director of Small Business and Entrepreneurship Bruce Kidd. "This is a classic steeple chase. You've got lots of hurdles to...
More

Woman sets sights on freedom: Disability isn't keeping shop owner from goalRestricted Content

August 28, 2006
Candace Beaty
Two doors opened for Pam Evans on Aug. 5-one to her own clothing store and the other to her independence. The Cherry Shop represents both to Evans, who lost most of her sight over the course of a weekend in 1998 to a genetic eye disease called angioid streaks. Left with only her peripheral vision, she also lost her career in real estate and corporate sales. After a period of depression, Evans decided she wouldn't lose it all. "I felt...
More

Putting a spin on 911: Law-enforcement agencies embrace reverse systemRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Scott Olson
Langsenkamp, CEO of Sigma Micro Corp. in Indianapolis, began conducting research on the patented Reverse 911 Interactive Community Notification System in 1990. The technology, however, didn't hit the market en masse until a decade later. Today, roughly 350 law enforcement agencies in the United States and Canada, including those in Carmel and Beech Grove, use it to blast warnings to residents. "It was the first system that ever allowed people to dial phone numbers and deliver messages based on the...
More

NOTIONS: Mailbox of plenty could yield empty pocketsRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Bruce Hetrick is on vacation this week. In his absence, this column, which appeared on Aug.19, 2002, is being reprinted. Dear Reader: In our nation's capital, at the corner of Massachusetts Avenue and North Capitol Street, the Smithsonian Institution has converted a former post office into the National Postal Museum. Carved into the white granite wall is an inscription called "The Letter." Written by former Harvard University President Charles W. Eliot and edited by former U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, it...
More

Long-distance diagnoses are company's specialty: NearMed to provide radiology services to hospitalsRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Tom Murphy
An Indianapolis health care startup plans to begin diagnosing patients this fall without actually seeing any of them face to face. NearMed will venture into the fastgrowing market for "teleradiology" by offering a network of doctors around the clock and radiology subspecialists who work days and evenings to read X-rays and other images transmitted over a secure computer network. The Intech Park-based company will call on radiologists in Indiana, Texas and Idaho. In addition, it will provide clients with picture...
More

RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Programmers make lousy site designersRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Tim Altom
Many, perhaps most, Web sites are hard to use. That applies to commercial sites, personal sites, almost any kind of site. In the early days of the Web, nobody was surprised at this, because the Web was a dancing bear. The wonder wasn't that it danced gracefully, but that it danced at all. Today, visitors are much more discerning. In fact, there is a cottage industry in lambasting poorly designed sites. One of my favorite places to go on the...
More

Duty in Iraq inspires reservist's invention: Mtek founder hoping face mask will save livesRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Scott Olson
Impressed with the design, which military personnel admitted was years ahead of what's now in use, the Army's Soldier Systems Center purchased 10 of the prototypes Aug. 1 for testing. Mahan, 23, of Martinsville, ultimately hopes to create manufacturing jobs in Indiana by mass-producing the face masks for the military and law-enforcement agencies. With the help of his father, cousin and close friend, he's formed Mtek Weapon Systems to start the process. "It's definitely a radical departure from anything that's...
More

Professor reinvents classroom: Improving interaction reason behind DyKnowRestricted Content

August 21, 2006
Scott Olson
Dave Berque knew his first college teaching assignment couldn't get any worse when a fire in the overhead lights barely got a reaction from his students. "I was in a room with more than 100 people and only seven noticed it," said the chairman of DePauw University's Computer Science Department. "They were spending all of their energy copying notes and couldn't think about what was going on." The experience as a graduate student in the mid-1980s at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute...
More
Page  << 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. Thank you to the scientists who care enough to find a cure. We are so lucky that their intelligence has brought them to these understandings because it is through these understandings that we have new hope. Certainly the medicine will be expensive, these drugs usually are, especially the ones that are not mass produced. If I know anything from the walks that my town has put on for FA it is this: people care and people want to help. Donations and financial support can and will come to those who need it. All we need is a cure, the money will come. I mean, look at what these scientists have done thanks to the generosity of donors. 30 million dollars brings us here where we can talk about a drug's existence! There is so much to be frustrated about in this world, but this scientific break is not one of them. I am so happy for this new found hope. Thank you so much to the scientists who have been slaving away to help my friends with FA. We wish you speedy success in the time to come!

  2. I love tiny neighborhood bars-- when I travel city to city for work, it's my preference to find them. However, too many still having smoking inside. So I'm limited to bars in the cities that have smoking bans. I travel to Kokomo often, and I can promise, I'll be one of those people who visit the ma and pa bars once they're smoke free!

  3. I believe the issue with keystone & 96th was due to running out of funds though there were other factors. I just hope that a similar situation does not befall ST RD 37 where only half of the overhaul gets built.

  4. It's so great to see a country founded on freedom uphold the freedom for all people to work and patronize a public venue without risking their health! People do not go to bars to smoke, they can take it outside.

  5. So, Hurko, mass transit has not proven itself in Indy so we should build incredibly expensive train lines? How would that fix the lack of demand? And as far as those double decker buses to bus people in from suburbs, we can't fill up a regular sized buses now and have had to cancel lines and greatly subsidize others. No need for double decker buses there.

ADVERTISEMENT