Technology

Once-shuttered startup NoInk trades hands once more: Global Health Exchange buys software firmRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Call it a cautionary tale for entrepreneurs with a happy ending. After enduring a failed sale to a venture-capital-backed California firm, managers of NoInk LLC in January bought back the assets of their shuttered company and resurrected it. Now, just seven months later, they've sold NoInk again-this time to an acquirer who offers a better fit. "So many small companies are desperate for money, but don't [just] take money at any cost," said NoInk President David Kerr. "Be aware of...
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Six sites named 'Shovel Ready': State program designed to speed permit process for fast-track developersRestricted Content

August 14, 2006
Scott Olson
State officials have added another arrow to their quiver of economic-development incentives meant to attract companies to Indiana. A new pilot program, known as Shovel Ready, certifies land that can be rapidly developed. The aim is to make the properties more attractive to companies by cutting the time it takes to navigate the permitting process. "The ability to expedite a company's development will make us more competitive than perhaps we have been in the past," said Chris Pfaff, director of...
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Pools of Fun: Diving in the deep end Homebuilder's 'experiment' still paying off 25 years laterRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Julie Young
In 1981, few central Indiana residents considered an inground pool a backyard necessity, but Plainfield custom homebuilder Larry Good added one to a spec home anyway-and jumped into the deep end of a new enterprise. "After it was installed, the home sold immediately," said Bruce Holmes, CEO of the company Good launched. Pools of Fun started with one location and four employees. Today, it has five locations, a range of products and 90 full-time employees who share ownership of the...
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Create-a-job program serving disabled threatened: Federal funding cuts could mean early end for options available through customized employment initiativeRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Andrea Muirragui
Bryan Ballard and Cody Feldman never dreamed they'd end up here, soaking up the sun along Indianapolis' downtown canal, peddling frozen treats from their very own ice cream cart. They certainly never planned to become business partners when they met as adolescents playing Special Olympics basketball. But it happened anyway, thanks to a federally funded program intended to help significantly disabled individuals find work that fits their interests and skills. What makes the so-called customizedemployment effort unusual is its emphasis...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Your eye-dentity is the key to our futureRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Morton Marcus
By my calculations, the U.S. population will reach 300 million on or about Oct. 15. There is no need to specify the hour and minute. The population clock at the U.S. Bureau of the Census indicates that we are adding to our numbers at a rate of nearly one person each 10 seconds. Even though our population growth rate has been declining, the absolute growth numbers, and their implications, remain staggering. For example, if we average two persons per housing...
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Bonds' shaky support threatens Crane biz park: Region attempts to build on base's stay of executionRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
During his first months in office, Gov. Mitch Daniels' top priority was engineering a stay of execution for the Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center, 90 miles southwest of Indianapolis. Losing its 5,200 employees and contractors would have been a devastating blow to the region. Daniels' lobbying effort in Washington, D.C., was so successful that the Association of Defense Communities last month recognized him as "2006 Public Official of the Year." But troubles with local financing for a new business park...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Beware the dangers of PowerPoint attachmentsRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Tim Altom
In a bizarre twist on the term "Power-Point poisoning," some black-hat programmer with way too much time on his hands has created a PowerPoint presentation that, when opened as an attachment to an e-mail, plants a piece of spyware on your system that sends home to the mothership every keystroke and mouse click. Businessfolk in the Midwest need not panic, however, because the offending PowerPoint is easy to spot: it's in Chinese. In the business, this sort of infection is...
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WellPoint putting members' medical records online: Access to electronic medical information could reduce health care errrors and avoid unneccesary proceduresRestricted Content

August 7, 2006
Scott Olson
A benefits package WellPoint Inc. unveiled in July includes an ambitious effort that enables its 34 million members to access their medical records online. WellPoint's initiative to make the records available electronically is but one example of a national movement, backed by President Bush, to make all medical records available online within the next 10 years. Advocates say online systems can reduce medical errors and avoid unnecessary procedures by making patients' medical needs and histories available to doctors instantaneously. Indianapolis-based...
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Venture Center's Beck plans seed capital fund: Former Rose-Hulman Ventures prez returns to townRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Over the last three years at the helm of Indiana Venture Center Inc., one thing became all too clear to Steve Beck: Not much money is available locally for early-stage companies. So he's going to raise some himself. Last week, Beck, 59, announced he's stepping down as Indiana Venture Center president to become co-managing director of IVC Equity Partners, a new local seed capital fund. His IVC Equity cofounder is Scott Prince, 38, a Columbus native and Indiana University graduate...
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Ethanol backer harvesting investors: Cardinal, others see biofuel potential, while skeptics see risk 982 1372 1071 1392IBJ's Life Sciences & Biotech Magazine looks at the future of biofuel production in Indiana. SECTIONBRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Chris O\'malley
IBJ's Life Sciences & Biotech Magazine looks at the future of biofuel production in Indiana. SECTIONBDuring one day this month, Randolph County farmer Troy Prescott drove hundreds of miles to visit three western Ohio towns-gladhanding potential backers gathered at a VFW hall, an armory and a restaurant. And just a few days ago, in Fishers, he spelled out his vision to more than 50 people, some wearing suspenders and down-on-the-farm twangs. Prescott isn't running for Congress, but his 25-city road...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Is becoming a podcaster dream marketing?Restricted Content

July 24, 2006
Tim Altom
Imagine that your customers are so eager to hear from you that you don't even need to send them newsletters or e-mails, that they check each day, or even several times a day, to see if you have anything to tell them. What a dream marketing campaign, eh? There are catches, of course. Lots of them. But in the right circumstances, this come-and-get-it approach can work. It's known as "podcasting," a name that's a linguistic weld job so common in...
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Hitching its wagon to central Indiana: Wells Fargo quietly lassoes big share of local loansRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Matthew Kish
How big is the portfolio? Very big. How does it stack up to its rivals? Nobody knows for sure. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. requires banks to report the deposits they hold at branches, but it doesn't require banks to spell out how much commercial business they're generating geographically. "It's one of the biggest frustrations of the bank information that we [compile]," said Karen Dorway, president of Bauer Financial Inc., a Coral Gables, Fla.-based bank rating service that tracks market...
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Conseco takes fresh look at product development: New strategy emphasizes shared resources, efficiencyRestricted Content

July 17, 2006
Tom Murphy
Conseco Inc. rolled out a fresh blueprint for product development earlier this year, and it was high time the insurer did so, say analysts who follow the company. The Carmel-based holding company is combining the resources of its subsidiaries and developing a corporate-wide system to pump out products more efficiently for its two main operating segments, Conseco Insurance Group and Chicago-based Bankers Life. It hopes to see results soon. Conseco Insurance Group launched only four new products in 2004 and...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Will telecom reform bring cell service to remote areas?Restricted Content

July 17, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Those of us who spend a lot of time in airports get an effective education in the economics of competition by observing-and paying-the fares charged by airlines. It's really quite simple. Fly a route served by several airlines, especially if one of them is a low-cost, no-frills carrier such as Southwest, and fares will be reasonably low. But if you are unlucky enough to fly to or from a smaller city, or even a large one where a single carrier...
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Dow AgroSciences seeks better vaccine: Plant-based preventive measure loaded with potentialRestricted Content

July 17, 2006
Tom Murphy
Imagine a vaccine that kills salmonella bacteria in chickens long before they reach the food-processing center, possibly reducing the chance of a food-borne illness landing on your dinner plate. That's one of the possibilities researchers are thinking about on the northwest side of Indianapolis, where Dow AgroSciences has become a pioneer in the new frontier of plant-based vaccines. Earlier this year, the subsidiary of Dow Chemical Co. received the world's first regulatory approval for a plant-made vaccine from the U.S....
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BULLS & BEARS: Use paper, fifth-grade math to track investment resultsRestricted Content

July 17, 2006
Ken Skarbeck
Throughout history, we have devised methods to calculate and measure results for all kinds of activities. In academics, we have grading systems that measure student performance. In sports, the most important factor in any game is the score. But when it comes to keeping track of investment results, I suspect that many investors do not have a good grasp on how well their money has performed. Attempting to keep a mental scorecard of the rate of return on your investments...
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VIEWPOINT: Consumers should take charge of healthRestricted Content

July 17, 2006
David Lee
In an environment where we're all being asked to pay a larger share of our own health care costs, it's interesting to see how little time we spend thinking about major decisions that have an impact on our health. Like selecting a primary care physician or any medical specialist, for example. According to a recent Managed Care Weekly Digest survey, 67 percent of U.S. adults ages 18-64 said they spent eight hours or more researching an automobile purchase, yet only...
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Firm may hold key to earlier detection: Startup lands grants for breast cancer biomarkerRestricted Content

July 17, 2006
Scott Olson
Linda Malkas' arrival at the Indiana University School of Medicine four years ago is beginning to look like a coup for the city's life sciences initiative. Armed with promising cancer research, Malkas helped found CS-Keys Inc., which last month received a $285,000 infusion from BioCrossroads' Indiana Seed Fund and is poised to net a similar investment July 17 from Triathlon Medical Ventures in Cincinnati. The additional capital is critical to the startup's continuing development of a biomarker that detects breast...
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Alley's new aim: Consolidate electronics industry: Ex-banker shooting for $170M in revenue by 2012Restricted Content

July 10, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Since purchasing Escient Solutions in early 2003 and changing its name to Electronic Evolutions Inc., Mike Alley has increased revenue 35 percent, to $6.5 million. That'll be small potatoes if Alley's dreams for the company pan out. Alley, former Fifth Third Bank of Central Indiana president and CEO, wants to be a consolidator in the fragmented electronics and automation design and installation industry. Toward that end, he partnered in late June with electronics industry veteran Daniel Knotts and formed E2...
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Young entrepreneurs cash in on ring tones: West Coast VCs have big plans for local Web startupRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
As students at Warren Central High School just a few years ago, Michael Slate and David Hosei used to dream about becoming entrepreneurs. They started like many of them: cutting grass and selling candy door-to-door. Today, they rub elbows with West Coast venture capitalists. In April, the pair announced that Silicon Valley-based VantagePoint Venture Partners had invested in their Internet startup 3GUpload, a Web portal for the exchange of cell phone ring tones. Founded in a Purdue University dorm room...
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Animated startup foresees big growth in life sciences: Company produces 3-D graphics with young talentRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Scott Olson
Harlon Wilson and Kurtis Rush originally intended their Indianapolis-based upstart business to provide 3-D animation for use in court cases. But if they had stuck to that business plan, Medical Animatics Inc. could not have produced the video to the hilarious "Urine Stream," a song parody of Abba's "Dancing Queen." Here's a sample of the chorus: So when you get the chance, undo your pants ... And make a urine stream, gold and clean, oh it's such a dream. Urine...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: We need more Googles to take on governmentRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Tim Altom
As I write this, two of the biggest titans on the planet have just fought each other to a standstill. In one corner is the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). In the other corner, the search engine company Google. In 2005, the DOJ wanted to revive the Child Online Protection Act (COPA), which had already been swatted down by the Supreme Court as unconstitutional. The law didn't address child pornography, as has often been assumed in the case, but only...
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Westview soldiers on amid health care explosion: Hospital fares well against larger, newer competitionRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Tom Murphy
A touch-screen directory, a grove of potted trees and a muffin-bearing kiosk greet visitors entering the six-story atrium at the new Clarian North Medical Center in Carmel. A much milder scene awaits people walking into Westview Hospital a few miles away, on the west side of Indianapolis. There, a lonely player piano spills soft tunes into a one-story lobby filled with clusters of chairs and pamphlets on volunteering. "Quiet! Healing in Progress" reads a nearby sign. Indiana's lone osteopathic hospital...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary:Restricted Content

July 10, 2006
On June 1, Gov. Mitch Daniels and officials from the Indiana Public Employees Retirement Fund announced the Indiana Investment Fund, a $100 million investment vehicle. The fund will invest in early-stage startups and loans to mature firms. It will invest in Indiana-What's wrong with local investment pros? based agriculture, manufacturing, information technology, transportation and life sciences companies. Credit Suisse was selected to manage this new fund. As a global investment bank, Credit Suisse certainly has skilled bankers who can evaluate...
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New technology could put chill on hotspots: Emerging wireless access cards let users tap into the Internet anywhere they can receive cellular signalsRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Scott Olson
The "hot spots" that drive wirelessfidelity access-better known as WiFi-might be in for a cool-down. WiFi enables Internet users to log on without a wire connection, as long as they are in a hot-spot area. The sites have become so common that the number worldwide surpassed the 100,000 mark earlier this year, according to JiWire, a Web-based hotspot information provider. Thousands of businesses, universities and municipalities have invested in the technology. But wireless phone companies are challenging the technology with...
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  1. By the way, the right to work law is intended to prevent forced union membership, not as a way to keep workers in bondage as you make it sound, Italiano. If union leadership would spend all of their funding on the workers, who they are supposed to be representing, instead of trying to buy political favor and living lavish lifestyles as a result of the forced membership, this law would never had been necessary.

  2. Unions once served a noble purpose before greed and apathy took over. Now most unions are just as bad or even worse than the ills they sought to correct. I don't believe I have seen a positive comment posted by you. If you don't like the way things are done here, why do you live here? It would seem a more liberal environment like New York or California would suit you better?

  3. just to clear it up... Straight No Chaser is an a capella group that formed at IU. They've toured nationally typically doing a capella arangements of everything from Old Songbook Standards to current hits on the radio.

  4. This surprises you? Mayor Marine pulled the same crap whenhe levered the assets of the water co up by half a billion $$$ then he created his GRAFTER PROGRAM called REBUILDINDY. That program did not do anything for the Ratepayors Water Infrastructure Assets except encumber them and FORCE invitable higher water and sewer rates on Ratepayors to cover debt coverage on the dough he stole FROM THE PUBLIC TRUST. The guy is morally bankrupt to the average taxpayer and Ratepayor.

  5. There is no developer on the planet that isn't aware of what their subcontractors are doing (or not doing). They hire construction superintendents. They have architects and engineers on site to observe construction progress. If your subcontractor wasn't doing their job, you fire them and find someone who will. If people wonder why more condos aren't being built, developers like Kosene & Kosene are the reason. I am glad the residents were on the winning end after a long battle.

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