Technology

Daniels' economic development plan calls for pricey tools: Three incentive funds would cost more than $100MRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's days of economic development on the cheap may soon be finished. Three major new business-incentive funds are on the Indiana Economic Development Corp.'s wish list, each bearing a significant price tag. The General Assembly will decide next year whether to provide the more than $100 million IEDC requests to form them. Plans for the three funds are tucked into Gov. Mitch Daniels' comprehensive new state economic development plan, "Accelerating Growth," released April 25. It aims to bring Hoosiers' lagging...
More

NOTIONS: Readers weigh in on the quest for 'something more'Restricted Content

May 8, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Two weeks ago, I asked readers whether they'd witnessed what I have: More and more folks wanting "something more" from life and work. And if so, why? And why now? And how might "something more" manifest itself? Many responded-so many that I'll share this week some of the "whethers" and "whys" and next week some of the "hows." I heard from several readers who've dealt with this issue professionally. An Indianapolis placement consultant said, "I talk to people every day,...
More

Biz incubator out of room: IU Emerging Tech Center needs $20M or more for expansionRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
In its quest to develop high-tech startups, Indianapolis has established a healthy pipeline. But there's a bottleneck that's poised to become even more congested. Located at the head of the Central Canal, Indiana University's Emerging Technologies Center is the city's primary business incubator, chock-full of labs and equipment. Established in 2003, the 62,500-square-foot building is now crowded with 26 promising young firms. A handful have outgrown their space, and are on the cusp of "graduation." IUETC CEO Mark Long reports...
More

Special events pay off: Growth seen in career opportunities, event numbersRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Shari Held / Special to IBJ
Special events aren't just fun and games-they're big business, generating careers and economic activity that are anything but frivolous. Special event spending in Indianapolis is nearly $3 billion a year, according to Bob Shultz, public relations director for the Indiana Convention & Visitors Association. Annual spending for special events worldwide is $500 billion, according to research conducted by the Chicago-based International Special Events Society. In Money Magazine's annual "Best Jobs in America" survey, meeting and convention planners were ranked in...
More

BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Should we invest in ethanol or education?Restricted Content

May 8, 2006
During times of high gasoline prices, the investment made by the Daniels administration in six ethanol plants would seem prudent. The touted benefits of ethanol plants are that they create jobs in rural communities, support Indiana corn growers, improve air quality, and lower dependence on foreign oil. As an Indianapolis resident with little exposure to our farm economy, my first question was, "How do you make ethanol?" Ethanol is made by fermenting and distilling simple sugars like those found in...
More

New funds target life sciences: MidPoint concentrates on agricultural technology; Heron aims at broader marketRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Two new locally based venture capital funds believe Indiana is ripe with opportunity for biotech deals. With $20 million under management, Heron Capital LLC is broadly focused on the whole Hoosier life sciences market. Attempting to raise $30 million, the Mid-Point Food & Ag Fund LP has a narrower concentration: high-technology related to farming and nutrition. "We're very excited about our prospects," said Heron Managing Director Greg Maurer. "We have a number of deals in the hopper, some of which...
More

First-class parking: Airport freebie list includes former politicians, other VIPsRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Scott Jones could probably afford to buy the 1,800-space parking garage at Indianapolis International Airport, as one who's earned millions of dollars in patent income from voice mail technology he invented. But why buy the garage? The Indianapolis multimillionaire shows up on a list of nearly 400 politicians and other VIPs entitled to free parking at the airport, a review of airport records shows. Begun as a courtesy to a handful of elected officials decades ago, the free parking list...
More

CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Textbook cases of entrepreneurismRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
You get an idea; you build a business; you sell it and make a bundle. So it was with the recent deals that took out IBJ's No. 1 and No. 2 fastest-growing companies from 2005, Performance Assessment Network and Suros Surgical. We can bemoan the loss of headquarters, but let's face it, these are the kinds of payoffs most entrepreneurs dream of. In just a little over five short years, PAN investors put up $7.5 million in capital and sold...
More

Land drove Marsh sale: Sun Capital has backup in real estate if grocery biz failsRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Matthew Kish
When Marsh Supermarkets Inc. put itself on the block in November, the company's stock dove. When it cut future executive compensation $28 million a month later, the stock continued falling. When it terminated 25 executives and closed two groceries and six convenience stores, shares slipped yet again. Nothing, it seemed, could stop the downward spiral. Then a footnote appeared in the Fishersbased company's fiscal third-quarter financial report Feb. 21. It said an appraisal showed the company's real estate was worth...
More

BioCrossroads seeks help teaching math and science: Education center to bolster students' careersRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Indiana life sciences initiative BioCrossroads wants to improve the science and math skills of Indiana's elementary and high school students. To figure out how, it's asking the public for ideas. BioCrossroads released a "request for interest in participation" in the creation of a new K-12 Indiana Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education Resource Center. Patterned after the North Carolina Science, Mathematics and Technology Education Center, BioCrossroads' STEM is meant to be a Web-based, largely virtual organization. It would coordinate math...
More

IEDC hopes to establish regional venture capital funds: Counties may balk at spending tax money elsewhereRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It is the kind of business stimulus program that few oppose on paper, but to get the idea off the drawing board, IEDC must convince counties to relinquish their parochialism and ingrained spending habits. That's likely to be tricky. "One of the things we're trying hard to do as a state is to break down county borders where you have infighting, wasted resources and missed opportunities," said IEDC Executive Vice President and General Counsel Nathan Feltman. "We want to make...
More

Cleveland tech firm going west: Parker Hannifin falls short of employment promises, plans to leave Intech ParkRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Tom Murphy
A Cleveland-based technology giant plans to move its Intech Park operation next month, leaving behind some attractive office space and a broken promise to create jobs. Parker Hannifin Corp. will consolidate its Indianapolis location into a California site, spokesman Jim Cartwright said. It should empty its 30,700-square-foot offices in the park's Intech 10 building by the end of June. The move will have no impact on Parker Hannifin's Tell City production facility, which employs about 100 people who make industrial...
More

Foundry forges growth by displaying creativity: After struggling for clients, upstart ad firm hits strideRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Mark LeClerc, Matt Ganser and Jeff Morris started Foundry advertising agency in October 2004, with a five-figure bank loan and the promise of a lucrative account from an international mailorder retailer. But when their Lands' End deal fell far short of expectations, the trio was forced into cold-call mode. Because of non-compete clauses with their former employers, Foundry suddenly found itself with no active clients. "One of the first lessons we learned is that not everything promised to you comes...
More

At age 2, Future Fund still work in progress: So far, 7 startups have received investments from BioCrossroadsRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
For two years now, the $73 million Indiana Future Fund has been at work in the Indiana life sciences market. BioCrossroads, Indiana's public-private life sciences economic development initiative, is pleased with the results so far. "When we put the Indiana Future Fund together and surveyed the landscape, there were only two or three [local venture capital] firms that really identified themselves as in [the life sciences] area," said BioCrossroads President David Johnson. "Now we see much more traffic than we...
More

RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Protecting company data not always worth the effortRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Tim Altom
Like monkeys in cages, data seems to want to be free, and will connive ways to break out of restraints. Many times it takes advantage of human carelessness, as it did in Iraq recently. Two reporters were wandering through one of the Iraqi bazaars that have sprung up outside U.S. bases, and which feature items discarded by Americans, such as old boots and broken tools. The reporters saw a number of what the media has been calling "computer drives." These...
More

NASCAR a big deal for IRST: Role as security products provider could be worth $100MRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Ingersoll Rand Security Technologies has been named NASCAR's first official provider of security products, a deal that could mean substantial growth for the company's Carmel headquarters and an Indianapolis manufacturing plant, which together already employ 900. IRST is a division of Bermuda-based behemoth Ingersoll-Rand Co., which is better known for agricultural, construction and transportation equipment sold under names such as Bobcat and Thermo King. The link with the racing circuit is expected to drive home the point that Ingersoll-Rand is...
More

Gamer cashes in on hobby: Arcade cabinets combine old titles, new technologyRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Jessica Wolfe
Rick Barretto started filling his basement with arcade games soon after graduating from Indiana University. An avid gamer since his youth, he loved to play, but to get the games he wanted, he had to buy fullsized arcade cabinets-12 of them. His basement was only so big, and his wife's tolerance only so high. "My wife was saying, 'There's got to be a better way,'" said Barretto, 39. So he put his college computer-science classes to work and spent more...
More

Ivy Tech to focus more on results, not just growth: Student success and broader ties with employers among goals of community college system's five-year planRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Chris O\'malley
After growing its enrollment 75 percent the last decade, Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana is shifting its focus to student retention. A top administrator also wants to expand the number of training courses offered at businesses, as a way to supplement the system's $253 million annual budget. Some who've studied the state's educational system have recommended that Ivy Tech spend more to hire additional full-time faculty to strengthen its effectiveness. The school's five-year student retention plan calls for doubling...
More

Tech acquisitions are bittersweet: Investors win, but state loses headquartersRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
In the past two weeks, central Indiana's two fastest-growing high-tech companies have announced their sales to larger out-of-state firms. Local leaders are of two minds about it. On the one hand, there's the enormous payday for investors. Massachusetts-based Hologic Inc. is buying Indianapolis-based medical-device maker Suros Surgical Systems Inc. for at least $240 million. And St. Louis-based TALX Corp. scooped up Carmelbased Internet testing firm Performance Assessment Network Inc. for $75 million. Optimists hope to see much of that money...
More

SMALL BUSINESS PROFILE WTH: Firm mapping out its own success Owner shifts focus from old-school engineering to GISRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Marc D.
SMALL BUSINESS PROFILE WTH Firm mapping out its own success Owner shifts focus from old-school engineering to GIS Rex Jones wants to show off his company's work, so the lights go down, a computer comes on and a map of Starke County appears on a screen. The map is a maze of green lines representing county and local roads, red for state/interstate highways, blue for water. Jones zooms in further, picking a random street in the rural county. Up pops...
More

VIDEO GAME with a message: Local game designer Gabriel Entertainment mixes health education with virtual funRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
VIDE GAME with a message Local game designer Gabriel Entertainment mixes health education with virtual fun Few teen-agers would thrill at the prospect of an anti-smoking lecture. But if the same message were embedded in a video game, they might perk up and take notice. Indianapolis-based Gabriel Entertainment is counting on it. The company is just a few weeks away from completing the prototype of its new title, "Ocean Secret." Aimed at pre-teen and teenage girls, the game is a...
More

PAN deal lucrative for owners: Small number of investors share $75 million bounty from Carmel IT firm's saleRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It's the scenario entrepreneurs dream about. After just over five years in business, the founders of Carmel-based Performance Assessment Network Inc. have sold their company to a publicly traded St. Louis firm for $75 million in cash. Since PAN had only a handful of investors, its backers' profits are enormous. What's more, they can enjoy their payday with a clear conscience. Although PAN's acquirer is headquartered outside state lines, TALX Corp. plans to keep growing the operation here. PAN's executives...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Diversifying economy requires new mind-setRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Patrick Barkey
The microwave oven has been a staple in most American kitchens for so long that there is now a generation of young adults who've never lived without them. And for that same generation, the doughy, limp texture of foods like pizza quick-cooked in a microwave, in contrast to the crisped, browned texture produced over a longer time by conventional heat, is associated with the food, not the technology. If you've grown up eating from a microwave, that's the way food's...
More

RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: At home with that old computer? Prepare to be frustratedRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Tim Altom
Microsoft is yanking our chains again, and it's your fault. Oh, perhaps it's not your fault personally, but you've contributed-as has almost every businessperson in the world. We all buy Windows machines, then use Windows software on them. In return, Microsoft treats us to heaping piles of frustration, like when the company recently said that, contrary to prior announcements (and mine a few weeks ago in this space), some versions of the new Windows Vista operating system won't be available...
More

Experts: Businesses should prep for bird flu: Vast majority of U.S. companies have not budgeted for possible pandemic, despite warnings from health officialsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Scott Olson
The much-hyped Y2K computer bug came and went without so much as a whimper from a whirring hard drive. But unlike the threat of malfunctioning computers, health experts warn that the potential danger of an avian flu pandemic is far greater. In the event of a widespread outbreak in the United States, companies large and small need to be prepared in order to keep interruptions to a minimum, they say. "I am an evangelist for having a contingency plan," said...
More
Page  << 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. In reality, Lilly is maintaining profit by cutting costs such as Indiana/US citizen IT workers by a significant amount with their Tata Indian consulting connection, increasing Indian H1B's at Lillys Indiana locations significantly and offshoring to India high paying Indiana jobs to cut costs and increase profit at the expense of U.S. workers.

  2. I think perhaps there is legal precedence here in that the laws were intended for family farms, not pig processing plants on a huge scale. There has to be a way to squash this judges judgment and overrule her dumb judgement. Perhaps she should be required to live in one of those neighbors houses for a month next to the farm to see how she likes it. She is there to protect the people, not the corporations.

  3. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/engineer/facts/03-111.htm Corporate farms are not farms, they are indeed factories on a huge scale. The amount of waste and unhealthy smells are environmentally unsafe. If they want to do this, they should be forced to buy a boundary around their farm at a premium price to the homeowners and landowners that have to eat, sleep, and live in a cesspool of pig smells. Imagine living in a house that smells like a restroom all the time. Does the state really believe they should take the side of these corporate farms and not protect Indiana citizens. Perhaps justifiable they should force all the management of the farms to live on the farm itself and not live probably far away from there. Would be interesting to investigate the housing locations of those working at and managing the corporate farms.

  4. downtown in the same area as O'malia's. 350 E New York. Not sure that another one could survive. I agree a Target is needed d'town. Downtown Philly even had a 3 story Kmart for its downtown residents.

  5. Indy-area residents... most of you have no idea how AMAZING Aurelio's is. South of Chicago was a cool pizza place... but it pales in comparison to the heavenly thin crust Aurelio's pizza. Their deep dish is pretty good too. My waistline is expanding just thinking about this!

ADVERTISEMENT