Technology

Indiana to alter Web site: Small IT firms aren't thrilled with contract requirementsRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
For the first time in more than a decade, Indiana is shopping for a Web portal manager. Indiana Office of Technology CIO Karl Browning is attempting to make the state's award-winning Internet gateway even better. The hunt will also test Gov. Mitch Daniels' "Buy Indiana" initiative, which aims to give local companies a leg up in competition for state contracts. The larger players in Indiana's IT community say they're pleased with the new process. But some smaller firms complain it's...
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New Rose-Hulman chief a contrast to predecessor: Arizona academic takes reins after Midgley ousterRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
If higher education were a business, graduates would be its core product. Economic development would be a promising second line. New Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology President Gerald Jakubowski wants to make sure he's delivering exactly what the market demands. "At Rose-Hulman, we need to make sure we're meeting the needs of business and industry," Jakubowski said. "For a seamless transition into the work force, students must learn by doing." Jakubowski, 56, could be describing his own path to the president's...
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HMOs report steady profits, falling membership: Indiana insurers performed well overall in 2005Restricted Content

March 27, 2006
Tom Murphy
Most of Indiana's largest HMOs managed to turn profits in 2005, even as other kinds of health insurance gained market share, sucking away 6 percent to 15 percent of their customers. Technology improvements and more efficient operations helped counter those losses, health maintenance organization executives said. However, annual reports filed with the state Department of Insurance show that profit for some of these managed care options slipped compared to 2004. Industry insiders say many companies are reluctant to offer HMOs...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Legislature wastes another sessionRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Morton Marcus
The 150 men and women who make up the Indiana General Assembly have finished their annual freak show, folded their tents, and departed from Indianapolis. In their wake, they left some truly terrible legislation and another record of neglect for the interests of Indiana's too-long-suffering population. What was wrong with this session of the General Assembly? Your local editor will not grant me the space to be either sufficiently complete or detailed. Let's start with the governor's Major Moves program....
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Schneider Corp. has designs on big growth in Lawrence: Long-time engineering firm gets boost from state as it plans to make $4.4 million investment, add 140 workersRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Scott Olson
The voluminous building the Schneider Corp. occupies on the former Fort Benjamin Harrison property was built as a barracks for enlisted men and later converted to a dormitory. So it's fitting that the locally based engineering firm has a vision to create a university-type setting on its nearly fouracre campus where employees can receive training without stepping foot off the property. "We've worked on a strategic plan for the last couple of years, and Schneider University is part of that...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Mediocre planning efforts don't invite people to stayRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Don Altemeyer
Analysts say the housing market is slowing in Indianapolis and across the nation. Perhaps that's why three significant, real estate developments have attracted so much local media coverage recently. In one story, the City-County Council approved the development of 28 condos in Broad Ripple, despite strong resistance from the neighborhood association. Meanwhile, local planning councils easily approved two new developments-a subdivision on the far northeast side of town that will feature almost 2,000 homes and a large condominium complex in...
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Turned away, twice: Hot biotech inventor scores coastal cash after local VCs say noRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
When a proven Indiana life scientist invents a promising medical technology, you'd expect local venture capitalists would snap to attention. So when Lafayette-based Ash Access Technology Inc. announced March 14 it had landed $6 million in venture capital, it was surprising to note the names of the investors in the deal. None were based inside state lines. But Dr. Stephen Ash wasn't shocked. After all, he's been through this before. "I don't know what happened," Ash said. "I was disappointed....
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More students seek degree online: Working, career-hopping adults drawn by flexible degree formatRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Chris O\'malley
ITT Educational Services Inc. may nearly double by the end of this year the number of degree programs it offers entirely through online instruction as the school seeks to enroll students who can't make class because of work or family obligations. Six online bachelor degree programs and two online associate degree programs are in various stages of regulatory and accreditation review, according to the Carmel-based technical education provider, which has 38,800 students enrolled at schools in 28 states. President and...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: 'Dallas'-like TV hit in our future?Restricted Content

March 20, 2006
Just as the popular prime-time soap opera "Dallas" emerged from Texas oil-industry lore, "Indiana" someday could become a mega-hit on television. After, that is, the state becomes the "Texas of biofuels" and the lurid, steamy tales of Big Biofuel begin to play out. I'm not sure who came up with "Texas of biofuels," but the analogy surfaced after the recent announcement that the world's largest soybean processing plant and biodiesel facility will be built in northern Indiana. With this project,...
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TechPoint names up-and-coming Mira nominees: Annual award celebrates excellence in innovationRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
TechPoint won't distribute its annual Mira awards until its banquet at the Indiana Roof Ballroom May 19. But the state's largest high-tech trade association has completed the nomination process for its top awards, pulling together a list of 49 innovative companies and educators in such categories as information technology, life sciences and advanced manufacturing. About 750 people usually attend the Mira banquet. But the awards are meant to reverberate among a far wider population all year long as confirmation which...
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Federal patent legislation could mean major changes: Proposed reform act could cut down on 'trolling' and litigation by switching approvals to a first-to-file systemRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Scott Olson
Pending federal legislation could bring sweeping changes to a patent system critics say is broken and in need of repair. The Patent Reform Act-before Congress since last year-presents the most substantial overhaul in decades. Significant changes include creating a process to challenge patents after they are granted and awarding a patent to the first person to submit paperwork. Patents currently are granted to the first person who hatched the invention, regardless of when documents were filed. Time frames, though, can...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Behold the upcoming Vista of Microsoft operating systemRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Tim Altom
Microsoft has announced how it's going to package and sell its brand new operating system, now called "Vista," but long code-named "Longhorn." The company has devoted a big chunk of its home page to a single link to more information about Vista (www.microsoft.com). Of course, you can't buy it yet, because it hasn't been released, but you can look at screen captures of it. Be ready to read a while. Vista is coming in six flavors, two of which are...
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Markey's sells off sales unit: Move by audio-visual firm creates new tech companyRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Markey's Audio Visual, a south-side company that's decked the stage for some of corporate America's flashiest meetings and conventions, has sold its equipment sales and integration unit to a new firm owned by a competitor and by a family member. Sensory Technologies is held by Anne and Andy Sellers, principals of Indianapolis-based Video Images LLC-and by Kevin Markey, who headed Markey's sales and integration. The sale last week, for an undisclosed price, allows the 47-year-old Markey's to focus on its...
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Irwin to idle failed foray into venture capital: $20 million fund formed during dot-com boom, focused on financial softwareRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's sixth-largest venture capital fund is winding down. Founded in 1999, Irwin Ventures LLC is a subsidiary of Columbus-based Irwin Financial Corp. The fund, which in recent years reported assets of $20 million, focused on seed and early-stage investments in startup firms that create financial services software and technology. But Irwin Ventures' speculative investments didn't pan out as expected. "Based on the results since inception, this line of business was a financial disaster," said Ross Demmerle, an analyst with Louisville-based...
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Time switch creating computer nightmare: Technology experts predict change to daylight-saving could be Y2K all over againRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Chris O\'malley
If you have an important meeting starting April 2, beware of relying on your computer for a reminder-there's a fair chance you'll be late. The state's first-ever switch to daylight-saving time will leave thousands of computers confused about what time it is, and their users not much better off. PC clocks have to be adjusted just like the cuckoo over the mantle, but if you forget to switch the timezone setting from "Indiana (East)" to "Eastern Time"-or neglect to check...
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Forum Credit Union buys health-care consultant: Financial institution beefing up commercial servicesRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Matthew Kish
Forum Credit Union, central Indiana's largest credit union, has acquired Indianapolis-based health-care consulting firm Health Care Economics Inc. And banks are piping mad about it. "It's part of our effort to meet the needs of what our members have been asking us to do," said Andrew Mattingly, senior vice president of strategy and marketing for Fishers-based Forum. "They want to put all of their finances together [at one institution]." Health Care Economics primarily serves as a business consultant to medical...
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You can take it to the bank: Financial experts say state's economy is rising, merger mania isn't over and regulatory laws could take a tollRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
On Feb. 24, IBJ Publisher Chris Katterjohn, Managing Editor Greg Andrews and banking reporter Matt Kish sat down with four leaders from Indianapolis' banking and finance sector: Judith Ripley, director of the Indiana Department of Financial Institutions; Kit Stolen, CEO of Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis; Steve Beck, president and CEO of the Indiana Venture Center; and Keith Slifer, senior vice president of LaSalle Bank. Among the topics of conversation: How's the state's economy doing? Are more bank mergers on...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Indiana's life sciences future starts todayRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Indiana's life sciences future starts today In 2004, BioCrossroads was awarded a comprehensive grant by the Lumina Foundation for Education to study Indiana's life sciences K-12 education standing. One of the goals of the study was to find ways to improve student performance in science, math and technology in Indiana at the K-12 level. This study rightly identified an area where meaningful results can be achieved through concerted effort. More important, individuals at Marian College, who recognize the impact of...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Fixed-rate mortgage loans remain a relative bargainRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Ron Mcguire
Mortgage lenders have found all sorts of creative ways to get money into the hands of eager buyers, with interestonly, piggy-back and no-doc loans. While these loans have provided opportunities to fund more house than ever, the opportunity to sleep peacefully knowing your payments are locked in place makes fixed-rate mortgages a desirable option for many homeowners these days. Closing gap Even with interest rates inching up, fixed-rate mortgages never looked better compared to adjustable-rate mortgages, or ARMs, and short-term...
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Aprimo gears up for IPO: Acquisitions, internal growth put software firm in position to consider public leapRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Fast-growing marketing-software-maker Aprimo Inc. is positioning itself for an initial public offering, likely within the next 18 months. "I think they have big plans in the marketplace," said Kimberly Collins, senior analyst for Stamford, Conn.-based technology research firm Gartner Inc. "Clearly, Aprimo would like to ... file an IPO. I think they want very much to be the next Unica in the marketplace," referring to a direct rival that went public last August. Founded in 1998, Indianapolis-based Aprimo makes a...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Here's a recipe for business successRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Morton Marcus
Clovis Crowder did not become a leading Hoosier executive by default. He did not inherit his position. He earned it. A man of rugged countenance, imposing stature and brilliant intellect, he is often mentioned as a candidate for high elected office, but humbly declines all such invitations. Also, he has no ambition to be a university president or a basketball coach. Recently, he and I had the following conversation: MM: "Tell me, Mr. Crowder, what has been the essential feature...
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Indiana's universities give industry a boost: State touts wealth of higher-ed insurance programsRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Scott Olson
Politicians seem so much more 21st century when they talk about attracting life sciences and information technology jobs to Indiana. But they're not about to ignore the state's second-largest employer-the often-overlooked insurance industry. Indiana insurers employ more than 60,000 Hoosiers, second only to farming, and pay an average annual salary of $47,500, nearly $10,000 more than the state average, according to a 2004 study by Purdue University. Moreover, the industry boasts some of the state's largest public and private companies-WellPoint...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Is too much news leaving you woozy these days?Restricted Content

March 6, 2006
Tim Altom
When it comes to news, there are two kinds of consumers: the "E.F. Hutton people" and the "cocktail party people." E.F. Huttoners have it easy. Cocktail partiers are only now getting some help making their lives more manageable. Years ago, E.F. Hutton ran a series of commercials that would always take place in a crowded spot, like a restaurant or plaza. One actor would be talking about his investment advice and preface it with, "Well, my broker is E.F. Hutton,...
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Making the grade: Pay-for-performance system nearing reality for local physiciansRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Tom Murphy
Central Indiana stands on the leading edge of a national push by health care insurance systems to link doctors' pay with their performance. The Indiana Health Information Exchange-a not-for-profit collaboration among some of the state's largest health care providers-is developing a program that uses data collected from insurers and care providers to produce quality reports. Those reports then will be sent to doctors and used by the insurers to develop incentive programs for reimbursement. The goal: Start a system by...
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Emerging India: Indians explore prospects in Indiana: Delegation of 15 execs finds opportunities during tour of Indianapolis, Purdue tech parkRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Indians explore prospects in Indiana Delegation of 15 execs finds opportunities during tour of Indianapolis, Purdue tech park J.V.V. Satyanarayana spent the last three years launching his Chennai, India-based software firm. But after only 24 hours in Indianapolis, he was ready to expand his operation. Satyanarayana was part of a delegation of 15 Indian executives who visited Indiana last week. His business, SVL Infotech, manages the IT end of medical billing. It has 100 employees and handles claims worth $100...
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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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