Technology

CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: 'Dallas'-like TV hit in our future?Restricted Content

March 20, 2006
Just as the popular prime-time soap opera "Dallas" emerged from Texas oil-industry lore, "Indiana" someday could become a mega-hit on television. After, that is, the state becomes the "Texas of biofuels" and the lurid, steamy tales of Big Biofuel begin to play out. I'm not sure who came up with "Texas of biofuels," but the analogy surfaced after the recent announcement that the world's largest soybean processing plant and biodiesel facility will be built in northern Indiana. With this project,...
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TechPoint names up-and-coming Mira nominees: Annual award celebrates excellence in innovationRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
TechPoint won't distribute its annual Mira awards until its banquet at the Indiana Roof Ballroom May 19. But the state's largest high-tech trade association has completed the nomination process for its top awards, pulling together a list of 49 innovative companies and educators in such categories as information technology, life sciences and advanced manufacturing. About 750 people usually attend the Mira banquet. But the awards are meant to reverberate among a far wider population all year long as confirmation which...
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Federal patent legislation could mean major changes: Proposed reform act could cut down on 'trolling' and litigation by switching approvals to a first-to-file systemRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Scott Olson
Pending federal legislation could bring sweeping changes to a patent system critics say is broken and in need of repair. The Patent Reform Act-before Congress since last year-presents the most substantial overhaul in decades. Significant changes include creating a process to challenge patents after they are granted and awarding a patent to the first person to submit paperwork. Patents currently are granted to the first person who hatched the invention, regardless of when documents were filed. Time frames, though, can...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Behold the upcoming Vista of Microsoft operating systemRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Tim Altom
Microsoft has announced how it's going to package and sell its brand new operating system, now called "Vista," but long code-named "Longhorn." The company has devoted a big chunk of its home page to a single link to more information about Vista (www.microsoft.com). Of course, you can't buy it yet, because it hasn't been released, but you can look at screen captures of it. Be ready to read a while. Vista is coming in six flavors, two of which are...
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Markey's sells off sales unit: Move by audio-visual firm creates new tech companyRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Markey's Audio Visual, a south-side company that's decked the stage for some of corporate America's flashiest meetings and conventions, has sold its equipment sales and integration unit to a new firm owned by a competitor and by a family member. Sensory Technologies is held by Anne and Andy Sellers, principals of Indianapolis-based Video Images LLC-and by Kevin Markey, who headed Markey's sales and integration. The sale last week, for an undisclosed price, allows the 47-year-old Markey's to focus on its...
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Irwin to idle failed foray into venture capital: $20 million fund formed during dot-com boom, focused on financial softwareRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's sixth-largest venture capital fund is winding down. Founded in 1999, Irwin Ventures LLC is a subsidiary of Columbus-based Irwin Financial Corp. The fund, which in recent years reported assets of $20 million, focused on seed and early-stage investments in startup firms that create financial services software and technology. But Irwin Ventures' speculative investments didn't pan out as expected. "Based on the results since inception, this line of business was a financial disaster," said Ross Demmerle, an analyst with Louisville-based...
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Time switch creating computer nightmare: Technology experts predict change to daylight-saving could be Y2K all over againRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Chris O\'malley
If you have an important meeting starting April 2, beware of relying on your computer for a reminder-there's a fair chance you'll be late. The state's first-ever switch to daylight-saving time will leave thousands of computers confused about what time it is, and their users not much better off. PC clocks have to be adjusted just like the cuckoo over the mantle, but if you forget to switch the timezone setting from "Indiana (East)" to "Eastern Time"-or neglect to check...
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Forum Credit Union buys health-care consultant: Financial institution beefing up commercial servicesRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Matthew Kish
Forum Credit Union, central Indiana's largest credit union, has acquired Indianapolis-based health-care consulting firm Health Care Economics Inc. And banks are piping mad about it. "It's part of our effort to meet the needs of what our members have been asking us to do," said Andrew Mattingly, senior vice president of strategy and marketing for Fishers-based Forum. "They want to put all of their finances together [at one institution]." Health Care Economics primarily serves as a business consultant to medical...
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You can take it to the bank: Financial experts say state's economy is rising, merger mania isn't over and regulatory laws could take a tollRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
On Feb. 24, IBJ Publisher Chris Katterjohn, Managing Editor Greg Andrews and banking reporter Matt Kish sat down with four leaders from Indianapolis' banking and finance sector: Judith Ripley, director of the Indiana Department of Financial Institutions; Kit Stolen, CEO of Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis; Steve Beck, president and CEO of the Indiana Venture Center; and Keith Slifer, senior vice president of LaSalle Bank. Among the topics of conversation: How's the state's economy doing? Are more bank mergers on...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Indiana's life sciences future starts todayRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Indiana's life sciences future starts today In 2004, BioCrossroads was awarded a comprehensive grant by the Lumina Foundation for Education to study Indiana's life sciences K-12 education standing. One of the goals of the study was to find ways to improve student performance in science, math and technology in Indiana at the K-12 level. This study rightly identified an area where meaningful results can be achieved through concerted effort. More important, individuals at Marian College, who recognize the impact of...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Fixed-rate mortgage loans remain a relative bargainRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Ron Mcguire
Mortgage lenders have found all sorts of creative ways to get money into the hands of eager buyers, with interestonly, piggy-back and no-doc loans. While these loans have provided opportunities to fund more house than ever, the opportunity to sleep peacefully knowing your payments are locked in place makes fixed-rate mortgages a desirable option for many homeowners these days. Closing gap Even with interest rates inching up, fixed-rate mortgages never looked better compared to adjustable-rate mortgages, or ARMs, and short-term...
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Aprimo gears up for IPO: Acquisitions, internal growth put software firm in position to consider public leapRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Fast-growing marketing-software-maker Aprimo Inc. is positioning itself for an initial public offering, likely within the next 18 months. "I think they have big plans in the marketplace," said Kimberly Collins, senior analyst for Stamford, Conn.-based technology research firm Gartner Inc. "Clearly, Aprimo would like to ... file an IPO. I think they want very much to be the next Unica in the marketplace," referring to a direct rival that went public last August. Founded in 1998, Indianapolis-based Aprimo makes a...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Here's a recipe for business successRestricted Content

March 13, 2006
Morton Marcus
Clovis Crowder did not become a leading Hoosier executive by default. He did not inherit his position. He earned it. A man of rugged countenance, imposing stature and brilliant intellect, he is often mentioned as a candidate for high elected office, but humbly declines all such invitations. Also, he has no ambition to be a university president or a basketball coach. Recently, he and I had the following conversation: MM: "Tell me, Mr. Crowder, what has been the essential feature...
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Indiana's universities give industry a boost: State touts wealth of higher-ed insurance programsRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Scott Olson
Politicians seem so much more 21st century when they talk about attracting life sciences and information technology jobs to Indiana. But they're not about to ignore the state's second-largest employer-the often-overlooked insurance industry. Indiana insurers employ more than 60,000 Hoosiers, second only to farming, and pay an average annual salary of $47,500, nearly $10,000 more than the state average, according to a 2004 study by Purdue University. Moreover, the industry boasts some of the state's largest public and private companies-WellPoint...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Is too much news leaving you woozy these days?Restricted Content

March 6, 2006
Tim Altom
When it comes to news, there are two kinds of consumers: the "E.F. Hutton people" and the "cocktail party people." E.F. Huttoners have it easy. Cocktail partiers are only now getting some help making their lives more manageable. Years ago, E.F. Hutton ran a series of commercials that would always take place in a crowded spot, like a restaurant or plaza. One actor would be talking about his investment advice and preface it with, "Well, my broker is E.F. Hutton,...
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Making the grade: Pay-for-performance system nearing reality for local physiciansRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Tom Murphy
Central Indiana stands on the leading edge of a national push by health care insurance systems to link doctors' pay with their performance. The Indiana Health Information Exchange-a not-for-profit collaboration among some of the state's largest health care providers-is developing a program that uses data collected from insurers and care providers to produce quality reports. Those reports then will be sent to doctors and used by the insurers to develop incentive programs for reimbursement. The goal: Start a system by...
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Emerging India: Indians explore prospects in Indiana: Delegation of 15 execs finds opportunities during tour of Indianapolis, Purdue tech parkRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Indians explore prospects in Indiana Delegation of 15 execs finds opportunities during tour of Indianapolis, Purdue tech park J.V.V. Satyanarayana spent the last three years launching his Chennai, India-based software firm. But after only 24 hours in Indianapolis, he was ready to expand his operation. Satyanarayana was part of a delegation of 15 Indian executives who visited Indiana last week. His business, SVL Infotech, manages the IT end of medical billing. It has 100 employees and handles claims worth $100...
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IT firm bought again: New York company acquires Core Business Technology but will move HQ to IndyRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Now, Core Business Technology Solutions has gone down the aisle again, tying the knot last month with White Plains, N.Y.-based Convergence Technologies Inc.-a deal that makes Indianapolis headquarters for a company with 270 employees and $105 million in revenue. But, with apologies to Wynette, nobody at this wedding sang, "Stand by your LAN." The good ol' local area network is now just a slice of the increasingly diverse information-technology products and services Core offers small and midsize companies these days....
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Clarian climbs aboard podcast bandwagon: Hospital network finds new way to broadcast its message to employees and the communityRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Tom Murphy
Communications experts say the medium, which has been around only a couple of years, carries loads of marketing potential. "You're immediately tying a voice to the company and a face to the company. That's a powerful thing," said Kelly Hendricks, president of BLASTmedia, an Indianapolis-based public relations firm. "It's going to be interesting to see how this evolves." Evans decided to try Clarian's hand at podcasting after his research found it costs "almost nothing" to produce a message and upload...
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Six firms land $6.1M from state tech fund: 21st Century program issues its first grants since 2004; local companies Semafore, Cadent among recipientsRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
Scott Olson
The state launched the fund in 1999 to invest in new technologies and appropriated $137 million during the first five years of the program. The state awarded no money in 2005, partly because none was available the first half of the year. The administration took the second six months to get acquainted with the fund. Kidd left his job as vice president of the Indiana Venture Center in October to join IEDC. The veteran small-business consultant since has helped reshape...
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Blog Boom: Newest Web craze becoming a key tool for business marketing, communicationsRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Myles Brand needed a way for his organization to reach out to the public. It had to be direct and immediate and initiate an honest two-way discussion. Brand, NCAA president, chose an offbeat idea-albeit one with a growing following-to solve this age-old business problem. He gave the directive late last year for the NCAA to launch its first blog, an online presence that two years ago few corporate types understood, much less considered a viable means of communication. Now, the...
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College hatches business to measure airwaves: Big wireless firms flocking to one-of-a-kind databaseRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Ball State University has created what could be a moneymaking venture to help the nation's wireless providers find dead spots in their signal footprints even before they put up the first towers. The university's Office of Wireless Research and Mapping said it has at least $720,000 in tentative contracts from businesses and government agencies. "My hope is, in two or three months, we have a fully operational center that is going to be recognized nationally," said Bizhan Nasseh, a Ball...
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Open source gaining traction: Government departments, more businesses seek alternatives to Microsoft, othersRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
Scott Olson
The Indiana Department of Education's effort to outfit high schools with computers is a costly endeavor for a state strapped for cash. But installing what is known as open-source software is softening the blow. As the name implies, open-source programming is available for users to study, modify and share freely-a sharp contrast to the proprietary software sold by behemoths such as Microsoft Corp. and Oracle. Expensive licensing fees associated with the proprietary software sent the Education Department looking for alternatives....
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PETER SCHNITZLER Commentary: Embrace India while you still canRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
PETER SCHNITZLER Commentary Embrace India while you still can India will fool you, if you don't pay attention. The term "developing nation" doesn't begin to do it justice. Having traveled internationally a number of times before, I thought I was prepared for whatever culture shocks awaited more than 8,000 miles away. I anticipated the heaving crowds, the livestock in the crumbling streets, even the abject poverty. I didn't expect innovation. And especially not entrepreneurship on par with the kind found...
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Startup receives first Indiana Seed Fund investment: Purdue-bred SonarMed plans move to IndianapolisRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
Until recently, SonarMed Inc., a startup developing a new type of breathing tube, was just a mailbox at Purdue University. But having recently been awarded the first investment from the BioCrossroads' Indiana Seed Fund, SonarMed plans to move into office space in Indianapolis, hire 15 to 20 employees before the end of the year and begin seeking U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for its device. The Indiana Seed Fund was formed last summer and now has $6 million to...
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  1. "This was a very localized, Indiana issue," he said. As in, Indiana failed to expand Medicaid to cover its poor citizens resulting in the loss of essential medical services, including this EMS company. Well done, Indiana GOP. Here are the real death panels: GOP state governments who refuse to expand Medicaid for political reasons.

  2. In the "one for all, all for none" socialist doctrine the sick die...this plus obama"care" equates to caucasian genocide plus pushed flight to cities thus further eroding the conservative base and the continualed spiral toward complete liberal/progressive/marxist America.

  3. There is a simple reason why WISH is not reporting on this story. LIN has others stations in different markets that are affiliated with CBS. Reporting about CBS blindsiding WISH/LIN due to CBS's greed and bullying tatics would risk any future negoations LIN will have with CBS in other markets.

  4. My best always! Dave Wilson

  5. How did Columbus, Ohio pull off a car share service without a single dollar of public subsidies? They must not have a mayor who is on the take like Indianapolis. Daimler Benz offers Columbus residents their Smart Cars on a market-driven basis: "This has some neat features. Cars don’t have to be picked up and dropped off at fixed points. You find one with your smart phone based on GPS, and drop it off anywhere in the service area you can find a spot – even at a meter. These cars aren’t required to feed the meter so you get free on street parking while using them. I was told this system was put in place on a market basis without subsidies – and that the vendor actually pays the city for the use of the meters." http://www.urbanophile.com/2014/05/26/checking-in-on-columbus/

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