Technology

GERALD BEPKO Commentary: Don't underestimate value of teamworkRestricted Content

December 12, 2005
Any area of human activity can be improved by good teamwork. Teamwork requires leadership, by both those designated as team leaders and team members alike. In sports, as in life, the most valuable player is often not the person who calls the plays. Teamwork is explored in an interesting way in a 2002 book by management consultant Patrick Lencioni titled, "Five Dysfunctions of a Team." The book is getting renewed attention because of the interest of sports leaders. Seven NFL...
More

Backyard gushers: Prolific Plummer oil field profitable for Citizens as crude prices riseRestricted Content

December 12, 2005
Chris O\'malley
They've also pumped up revenue for Citizens Gas & Coke Utility, thanks to the soaring price of oil this year. The utility's oil revenue for the fiscal year ended Sept. 30 nearly doubled, to $4 million from $2.26 million in fiscal 2004. Since 1969, the Oil Division has generated income of nearly $40 million. In fiscal 2005, income of the Oil Division rose 160 percent, to $2.6 million, vs. $1 million in 2004. Although $2.6 million is not a huge...
More

Disappearing Ink: People go to great lengths, spend big money to erase their youthful body-art decisionsRestricted Content

December 12, 2005
Scott Olson
People go to great lengths, spend big money to erase their youthful body-art decisions When Allen George groggily awoke one morning 30 years ago after a night of drinking with two Army buddies, he couldn't figure out why his arm was stuck to the bedsheet. A closer look revealed a large blood spot had soaked through and dried overnight. He carefully tore away the sheet and looked at his forearm. Staring back at him was a large, brightly colored peacock sitting...
More

Women inventors pursue their creative dreams: From doggie car seats to valve-less hydraulic systems, these visionaries keep creating practical productsRestricted Content

December 12, 2005
Cynthia A.
Windshield wipers, disposable cell phones, Scotchgardâ„¢, the first automatic dishwasher, disposable diapers, Barbie dolls, nonreflective glass, brassieres, CPR mannequins and "whiteout." These items have one key feature in common-they were all invented by women. Since the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office does not keep gender statistics, it is impossible to know exactly how many patents women hold. One thing is certain: since 1809 when Mary Dixon Kies became the first woman to receive a patent from the government, many other...
More

Telepoint Voice and Data Systems: Phone-tech firm aims to answer all clients' calls Company rebounding after Y2K-related downturn 379 587 474 599366 605 475 616Address: 3912 Pendleton Way Phone: 545-6900 Web site: www.telepoint.comE-mail: bboyd@telepoint.Restricted Content

December 5, 2005
Susan Raccoli
Address: 3912 Pendleton Way Phone: 545-6900 Web site: www.telepoint.comE-mail: bboyd@telepoint.comFounded: 1987 Founder: Bruce Boyd Owner: Bruce Boyd and Larry Shinn Service/product: business telephone systems and computer networks, sales and service Employees: eight Revenue (2004): $1.2 million One-year goal: increase customer base 20 percent Industry outlook: Looks good, with the deployment of voice-over-Internet-protocol technology and voice-data conversions. one-room office in Castleton and three employees. The business plan called for two of them to make 50 cold calls a day, while the...
More

Prominent technology executive steps down: Wortman resigns from Mezzia after just one yearRestricted Content

December 5, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Details are scant. But after only a year on the job, one of the city's best-known IT leaders is moving on. Mezzia Inc. CEO David Wortman has resigned. "It was just time for a change," Wortman said. "I was with the company for a year, accomplished a lot, and was ready for a change." Best known as the longtime CEO of locally based manufacturing softwaremaker Made2Manage Systems, Wortman, 54, led his former company through an initial public offering. But he...
More

Comcast is boosting cable rates for 2006: Annual price hike could be ammunition for competitorsRestricted Content

December 5, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Comcast plans to increase cable TV rates an average of 5.1 percent in its suburban Indianapolis territory next year, even as SBC Communications threatens to roll out a cable-killing video service via phone lines. Annual rate hikes by cable companies have become as inevitable as sitcom reruns. Comcast last jacked up local basic cable rates a year ago, by 6.5 percent. Although the 2006 increase is more modest, SBC already is using it in an attempt to soften up consumers...
More

RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Lesson from Sony mess: Don't toy with consumersRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
Tim Altom
You know, I understand the need to protect one's intellectual property assets. I do. And I understand the frustration of those companies in the entertainment business that put out a product electronically only to have it instantly copied and distributed. But I think it's going a little far for a recording label to load a piece of software onto a user's computer that is supposedly only for controlling and playing a protected music CD, but actually hijacks parts of the...
More

Center offers courses in global adjustment: Programs help companies learn cultural differencesRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
Scott Olson
In India, where cricket is the sport of choice, telling an employee he knocked the ball out of the park with his latest proposal most likely would confuse him. The communications gap and other cultural contrasts between the United States and a country such as India can be as vast as the 10-hour time difference. So, as local software developer Sigma Micro Corp. prepared to launch operations at what it refers to as an off-shore development center in the city...
More

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: What's protected in United States may not be elsewhereRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
Amie Peele
Globalization It's a buzz word and opportunity; a blessing and a curse. The shrinking global marketplace can help jump start companies that learn how to navigate the morass of regulations and potential pitfalls regarding the protection of intellectual property and personal and business information outside of the United States. But compliance with U.S. laws regarding trademark, patent, privacy and other areas does not necessarily equal compliance in other countries. Successful U.S. companies can find themselves facing uphill battles if they...
More

Cable firms call foe a phony: Group touting itself as consumer group funded by biz giantsRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Chris O\'malley
At first glance, Consumers for Cable Choice appears to be one of those grass-roots organizations likely to have a framed picture of Ralph Nader on its wall. You know, the kind of activist group whose religion is social justice, whose bible is Mother Jones, and to whom eternal damnation would be to accept a penny from greedy and manipulative Big Business. Not so with Consumers for Cable Choice. The Indianapolis group that advocates more competition in cable and relaxed regulation...
More

VIEWPOINT Valerie Eickmeier: Business needs to harness power of artsRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
VIEWPOINT Valerie Eickmeier Business needs to harness power of arts Indiana will more fully reach its potential in economic development for the 21st century when its common goal is to build a community where commerce and creativity can thrive. The world is entering an era some business leaders and economists are calling the "Conceptual Age." They trace the economic growth of our country from agriculture to industrial manufacturing, technology and the Information Age. Today, our country's primary economic growth and...
More

Technology proposals get business focus: IEDC requests new 21st Century Fund applicationsRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
It's been 18 months since state government requested new technology proposals from startups or academics. The days of waiting are now finished. "We're in business," said the Indiana Economic Development Corp.'s new director of entrepreneurship, Bruce Kidd. "The open sign is in the window. We want to start accepting applications again." On Nov. 16, the IEDC issued a request for applications to its $75 million 21st Century Research and Technology Fund. Much has changed since March 2004, when the state...
More

Lawrence, Crane build on base realignment: Economic developers hope to increase job countRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Now that Indiana has survived the latest round of military base closings relatively unscathed, state leaders are turning to their next task: spurring economic development around the state's two largest remaining military assets. After two years of review, the military's Base Realignment and Closure process concluded Nov. 9 when Congress allowed the BRAC commission's recommendations to become law. When the commission unveiled its recommendations this spring, state officials were relieved the Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center in southwest Indiana would...
More

At Purdue, student feedback is click away: Professors use radio response devices in class to see if they are getting throughRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Tracy Donhardt
It's a rare college student who will raise a hand in the classroom and say to the instructor, "Could you please repeat that? I don't understand." More common are groups of students who, when asked if they understand material just covered, sit and stare back, neither nodding nor shaking their heads. Faculty members tend to take no response as an affirmative, pass out tests, then find out who actually understood the material only after scoring the tests. And with some...
More

'Backward' thinking seen as key to future: Students hope experiential history puts them on promising career pathRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Chris O\'malley
As counterintuitive as it sounds, "experiential history" is one of seven key careers, besides usual suspects like logistics and bioinformatics, that are the focus of the University of Indianapolis' Institute for Emerging Careers. No, drug testing of college faculty isn't among the emerging careers. The institute was formed last year with a $750,000 Lilly Endowment grant. It aims to stem the so-called "brain drain" of Indiana's college graduates to other states in search of work-in part by pointing them in...
More

Mixed bag for tech parks: Facing heavy competition for tenants, some developments thrive while others struggleRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Tom Murphy
The stretch of land along Interstate 74 near Shelbyville lies mostly vacant, save for a couple of buildings and a network of roads and other infrastructure snaking through the property. This barren look is not what Intelliplex Park organizers had in mind more than two years ago, when their project became one of the first to receive the state's certified technology park designation. "This is a lot harder than I thought it was going to be," said Tony Lennen, CEO...
More

ITT Educational Services rebounds from federal probe: With stock at 52-week high, company plans growthRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Scott Olson
After rebounding from a federal criminal probe that uncovered no wrongdoing, ITT Educational Services Inc. is proceeding with an ambitious growth plan in hopes of building upon a bullish earnings run. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Houston, which led the investigation into whether the Carmel-based private provider of postsecondary degree programs had falsified student records, acknowledged in June that it did not turn up evidence justifying the charges. "It was very, very disruptive and very distracting to the organization," ITT...
More

MASTER OF THE PLAN: Ultra-prepared president has Purdue primed for 'pre-eminence'Restricted Content

November 14, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
It's half-past eight on a Monday morning and Martin Jischke is at his desk, poring over notes. This is how Purdue University's president spends his days and most of his nights-preparing to be prepared. At any time, Jischke could be interacting with students, alumni, faculty, legislators or business leaders. He wants to be ready for their questions with clear, articulate answers, no matter the subject. His responses seem off-thecuff, but make no mistake: Jischke has studied and considered his position...
More

BEHIND THE NEWS: Hilbert's next act: Jumping into private equity gameRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Greg Andrews
Stephen Hilbert suffered another legal defeat last week. But don't bet the founder and ex-CEO of Conseco Inc. is sitting around feeling sorry for himself. In fact, this fall Hilbert, 59, is quietly launching a major new business, one that will get him back into the acquisition game, a field he savored during his two decades atop Conseco. Details are sketchy, because Hilbert isn't talking. But here's what a little snooping turned up: Attorneys in July filed papers with the...
More

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: We need to push harder to foster a tech economyRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Patrick Barkey
You have to give the folks at Techpoint, the advocacy group for technology-oriented business in Indiana, plenty of credit for stamina. For eight years, these f o r wa r d - l o o k i n g folks have been carefully measuring the state's progress in what was once called the high-tech economy. And for each of those eight years, the message has been depressingly consistent: We remain at the back of the pack. That's not for lack...
More

Database puts 800 technology researchers in reach: Indiana Information Network hopes to link businesses with industry expertise through extensive online portalRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Tracy Donhardt
A Web-based melting pot of intellectual resources intended to aid technology transfer to the market boasts 800 researchers in 40 fields that businesses can tap for help. Indiana Innovation Network is an offshoot of Access Technology Across Indiana, or ATAIN, which was formed about 12 years ago as an alliance of universities, research institutions and businesses statewide. The alliance, led by John Schneider, assistant vice president for industry research at Purdue, helps research facilities commercialize their technology. IIN, founded by...
More

State revamps I-Light expansion project: Funding restored, but network limited to universitiesRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Scott Olson
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels has given high-speed Internet project I-Light the green light, but with a twist from its original intent. He agreed this month to support the final stages of funding for the project, which began in 1999 and connected supercomputers at Indiana University, Purdue University and IUPUI. The aim was to expand Indiana's digital infrastructure by connecting 15 cities via a fiber-optic network. Under his directive, though, only universities and related research parks can tap into the network,...
More

GERALD BEPKO Commentary: Another reason I'm proud to be a HoosierRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Ashley Crouse was an attractive, talented, 21-year-old junior at Indiana University's flagship campus in Bloomington who was filled with passion for good causes. On April 12, in one of those events that shake our beliefs to the core, she lost her life in an auto accident. At the time of her death, Ashley was a leader of IU students in efforts to raise funds for the Riley Hospital for Children through a dance marathon. These efforts began in 1991 when...
More

Being inventive to infinity: Entrepreneurial spirit still strong after 125 years of health careRestricted Content

November 14, 2005
Shari Held / Special to IBJ
Today, the entrepreneurial spirit of the Daughters, who are Roman Catholic, lives on. They have a rich legacy to celebrate as they approach the 125th anniversary of the founding of the hospital that was the forerunner of St. Vincent Hospital Indianapolis. "To do all that, these four Daughters of Charity had to pass the baton, the values and spirit along over many, many generations," said Dr. Malcolm Herring, a vascular surgeon at St. Vincent Hospital and physician liaison to mission...
More
Page  << 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. Of what value is selling alcoholic beverages to State Fair patrons when there are many families with children attending. Is this the message we want to give children attending and participating in the Fair, another venue with alooholic consumption onsite. Is this to promote beer and wine production in the state which are great for the breweries and wineries, but where does this end up 10-15 years from now, lots more drinkers for the alcoholic contents. If these drinks are so important, why not remove the alcohol content and the flavor and drink itself similar to soft drinks would be the novelty, not the alcoholic content and its affects on the drinker. There is no social or material benefit from drinking alcoholic beverages, mostly people want to get slightly or highly drunk.

  2. I did;nt know anyone in Indiana could count- WHY did they NOT SAY just HOW this would be enforced? Because it WON;T! NOW- with that said- BIG BROTHER is ALIVE in this Article-why take any comment if it won't appease YOU PEOPLE- that's NOT American- with EVERYTHING you indicated is NOT said-I can see WHY it say's o Comments- YOU are COMMIES- BIG BROTHER and most likely- voted for Obama!

  3. In Europe there are schools for hairdressing but you don't get a license afterwards but you are required to assist in turkey and Italy its 7 years in japan it's 10 years England 2 so these people who assist know how to do hair their not just anybody and if your an owner and you hire someone with no experience then ur an idiot I've known stylist from different countries with no license but they are professional clean and safe they have no license but they have experience a license doesn't mean anything look at all the bad hairdressers in the world that have fried peoples hair okay but they have a license doesn't make them a professional at their job I think they should get rid of it because stateboard robs stylist and owners and they fine you for the dumbest f***ing things oh ur license isn't displayed 100$ oh ur wearing open toe shoes fine, oh there's ONE HAIR IN UR BRUSH that's a fine it's like really? So I think they need to go or ease up on their regulations because their too strict

  4. Exciting times in Carmel.

  5. Twenty years ago when we moved to Indy I was a stay at home mom and knew not very many people.WIBC was my family and friends for the most part. It was informative, civil, and humerous with Dave the KING. Terri, Jeff, Stever, Big Joe, Matt, Pat and Crumie. I loved them all, and they seemed to love each other. I didn't mind Greg Garrison, but I was not a Rush fan. NOW I can't stand Chicks and all their giggly opinions. Tony Katz is to abrasive that early in the morning(or really any time). I will tune in on Saturday morning for the usual fun and priceless information from Pat and Crumie, mornings it will be 90.1

ADVERTISEMENT