Technology

Wells Fargo sees city as ripe for expansion: Commercial banking, capital management key to Indianapolis planRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Scott Olson
Wells Fargo & Co. took a couple of quiet but important steps earlier this year as part of a plan to build a major presence in the Indianapolis banking and financial services market. The San Franciscobased corporation in March opened a local Commercial Banking Division headed by longtime banking executive Lex Curry and a capital management office headed by well-known stock manager Tom Pence. The moves, by the nation's fifth-largest bank in terms of assets, are part of a corporate...
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Tech-park program tightens guidelines: Daniels administration hopes grants spur more innovationRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
In Shelbyville, home of the state's third certified technology park, economic development officials are excited. They just broke ground on a promising new park business: A Santa Fe Steakhouse. Since 2003, the state has approved $1.2 million for Shelbyville to help develop its technology park-one of 17 now scattered across Indiana, each meant to modernize the state through the attraction and development of high-tech companies. In total, the state has approved $9 million in grants since the certified technology park...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: China Syndrome hits 21st centuryRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
The Chinese have taken a keen interest in U.S. corporations of late. Just this year, a Chinese firm acquired the personal computer business of IBM Corp., and a consortium led by a large Chinese conglomerate investigated-but dropped-the idea of buying appliance maker Maytag. Though they involved long-standing and cherished American brands, neither deal raised too much reaction from American business executives or politicians in Washington. By contrast, when China's CNOOC Ltd. offered in June to acquire California-based Unocal, all hell...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Setting up home wireless not for faint of heart Books, articles, Web pages and instruction manuals may help you through it, but then again ...Restricted Content

July 25, 2005
Tim Altom
There are some big steps in life that merit serious thought. One is marriage. Another is buying a house. Yet a third is whether to set up a wireless network at home or in a small office. Of the three, the first two may be the less stressful. A friend of mine recently tried to set up a small WiFi (wireless) network at home, and gave it up in frustration after days of technologically induced anguish. He's been married for...
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New director brings experience to center: Woodall to mentor entrepreneurs at Purdue facilityRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Scott Olson
Jerry M. Woodall, the new director of Purdue University's ambitious entrepreneurship center, enjoyed an illustrious career spanning three decades at International Business Machines Corp. But for the 66-year-old New Englander, a job at New York-based IBM emerged only after another public corporation, The Gillette Co. in Boston, rescinded its offer. It did so, oddly enough, after learning he had only one eye. A cataract led doctors to remove his left eye after birth. "I distinctly remember them telling me I'd...
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Often thought of as new technology, fuel cells have long history: Here's how they work:Restricted Content

July 18, 2005
-Scott Olson
Scientists are working to make fuel cells a viable energy source for the 21st century. But, in fact, the technology dates back more than 150 years. Research began in the mid-1800s, but with the onset of the Industrial Revolution, fuel cells were abandoned in favor of more powerful alternatives, said Jack Brouwer, associate director of the National Fuel Cell Research Center in Irvine, Calif. "They didn't think fuel cells could contribute," he said. The technology sat dormant until the beginning...
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Incentives take aim at rising fuel costs: State pumps out grants for company vehicles using alternative fuelsRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Chris O\'malley
A combination of soaring gasoline prices, state grants and environmental idealism have whet appetites among businesses for "alternative fuel vehicles" such as this batterypowered Global Electric Motorcars model. A $3,996 grant from the Lieutenant Governor's Office paid for about one-third the cost of the Pizza Express vehicle, manufactured by a DaimlerChrysler subsidiary. "Industries such as ours should be pioneers in the electric vehicle frontier," said Gabe Connell, franchisee of the Pizza Express restaurants near IUPUI and in Broad Ripple. As...
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Firm plans to get personal with clients' home pages: Former gubernatorial candidate runs Web businessRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Scott Olson
Developing an Internet home page that gives users more options for content than what behemoths such as America Online and Yahoo! offer through their syndicated selections has become the ambition of George Witwer. The 46-year-old Bluffton native, who once aspired to be Indiana governor, launched the northwest-side Humanizing Technologies in January 2000. With much of the product's research and development in the can, the venture is close to weaning itself from investors and, for the first time, could turn a...
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Scammer targets local trust: E-mail scheme seeks data from Pulliam grant recipientsRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
An Internet scammer borrowed the identity of a high-profile local foundation this month, blasting out an error-riddled e-mail message that solicited personal information from former grant recipients. Leaders of the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust responded by sending its own e-mail to all 2,400 individuals on its electronic contact list, instructing them to disregard the fake missive that promised a $2.5 million grant. Fallout from the so-called phishing attack appears to be minimal so far, trust CEO Harriet M. Ivey...
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VIEWPOINT: Hoosiers gave tech transfer a big boostRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Cam Carter
Today, we take for granted that our state universities play a role far beyond their traditional educational mission-especially in the economic arena. University-sponsored research is being licensed to the private sector, or used to form new companies. Universities are managing business incubators. Consulting partnerships between academia and industry are commonplace. It wasn't always this way. Not long ago, university officials were skeptical of becoming too involved with the private sector. Business leaders and investors didn't recognize the value of innovation...
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Court files grow thick against Guidant: Shareholders, patients, employees air their grievancesRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Tom Murphy
"Attention, patients with Guidant heart defibrillators," the announcer's voice booms as the television commercial begins. Nearly 50,000 of the devices were recalled June 17, and people using one may be at risk, according to the ad, which has run in Tennessee, Kentucky and central Indiana so far. It ends by urging viewers to call the Becker Law Office in Louisville for a free consultation. That ad could spawn at least 10 wrongful-death lawsuits, according to Gregory Bubalo, a Louisville-based lawyer...
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Researchers seek fuel-cell answers: Universities, companies see long-term potential in alternative power deviceRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Scott Olson
The figure-eight slot-car track in the basement laboratory at IUPUI looks out of place amid the expensive computer equipment surrounding it. But when research assistant Alan Benedict fumbles with a few wires and the cars come to life, it becomes clear the racetrack is more than just a toy. The miniature cars operate on fuel cells and are part of Purdue University's exploration into the alternative power source. Scientists across the country are studying the clean power alternative, stoked by...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Here's the secret to painless wireless hookupsRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Tim Altom
Last time, in the June 27 issue, we explored the basics of data WiFi, which is often just called "wireless." This time, we'll look at how you hook up your laptop or notebook to a wireless provider. Wireless works pretty much like a cell phone does, except that you're exchanging data packets, not voice. Therefore, you need the computer equivalent of a cell phone. Most new notebook computers come with built-in wireless hardware that you'll never physically see, because it's...
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Purdue, Regenstrief look for ways to trim health costs: Health & Hospital Association a 'real-world' partnerRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Scott Olson
"Ultimately, we think the benefits of the partnership will be more efficient, costeffective care to the citizens of Indiana," Morr said. "The bottom line is, how can we do what we do better?" Small and medium-size hospitals, which typically do not have people on staff dedicated to study the types of issues the Regenstrief center will tackle, could benefit most from the affiliation, Morr said. Ed Abel, director in charge of health care services for the locally based Blue &...
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Ball State fosters alliance with film production pros: Center aims to help students and industryRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
It's a film school without the film school. Buoyed by a $20 million grant from Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment Inc., Ball State University's digital learning efforts are making way for a wave of projects worthy of attention on and off campus. Recent graduate Jaron Henrie-McCrea rode the swell all the way to the Student Academy Awards last month, winning an Oscar for his short film, "Knock Knock." Less than a week later, global industry group Media Communications Association-International honored three other...
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Marian College launches motorsports curriculum: Classes to focus on business side of racingRestricted Content

July 4, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
This fall, Marian College will begin offering a unique curriculum focused on the business of motorsports. Initially, motorsports-related classes will be offered within Marian's sports management program, but school officials said they'd like to expand the program to offer a minor and major in motorsports management. Unlike programs at Purdue University, IUPUI and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Marian's courses will not focus on computers and engineering. Instead, the program will instruct students in marketing, communications, sales and business management in...
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SPORTS: Keep F1 and its cash coming back to SpeedwayRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Bill Benner
I enjoy auto racing but must admit Formula One is not my cup of motor oil. On assignment for the local daily, I was at the initial U.S. Grand Prix at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, wrote a less-than-positive column about it, and haven't been back since. I liked the technology and the spectacle of the passionate, flag-waving fans, but everything else I viewed with disdain. Particularly distasteful was/is the smugness that permeates the F1 atmosphere. It emanates from the series'...
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'Clean' manufacturing center seeking cash to survive: General Assembly kills funding for Purdue programRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Chris O\'malley
The center created by the Legislature to help manufacturers use environmentally friendly materials and production methods is scrambling for cash to keep stamping out solutions. The Indiana Clean Manufacturing Technology & Safe Materials Institute lost its $475,000 annual state subsidy-a little over half its income-amid budget cutting in the last session of the General Assembly. Industry and environmental groups are lamenting the potential scale-back or even closure of the institute if new funding isn't found by August. "We certainly feel...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Wireless: What exactly is it and why is it unreliable?Restricted Content

June 27, 2005
Tim Altom
I've been getting a lot of questions about wireless lately. You know, WiFi, the magical connection between laptop and Internet, the key to actually working at Starbucks? The questions vary from, "Why does my laptop just disconnect sometimes?" to, "How can I get wireless out by the pool?" I tried to scrunch the answers down into a single column, but they kept bulging out of the seams. So I decided to split them into three consecutive columns. I wouldn't ordinarily...
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Taking the pulse of life sciences: Experts weigh in on whether Indiana is keeping up in the economic development raceRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
IBJ: Is Indiana gaining ground against other states in the race to grow as a life sciences hub? What are some specific benchmarks that underscore your opinion? JOHNSON: Indiana is gaining ground, but Indiana already starts on really very substantial ground. There are a lot of outside validations of that and I think it's important for this audience to hear a couple of them because there is nothing like having people on the outside pay attention to what we're doing...
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Clinic predicts Hamilton County will be fertile ground: Doctors relocate reproductive practice to growing areaRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Scott Olson
Surgery centers and a heart hospital are among a host of health care facilities that have risen in burgeoning north-suburban Hamilton County in recent years. Now, a new fertility clinic could contribute to the population surge by helping couples conceive children. The 6,400-square-foot Follas Center for Reproductive Medicine opened late last month on East 146th Street in Noblesville in a collaboration between several Indianapolis reproductive medicine innovators. The center is a partnership between Dr. David McLaughlin, a local pioneer of...
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Schools follow different flight paths: Aviation programs see contrasting demandRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
Two aircraft maintenance programs in close proximity to each other are far apart when it comes to successfully filling classrooms with budding mechanics. Times are so tough for Vincennes University's struggling aircraft maintenance program at Indianapolis International Airport's Aviation Technology Center that it asked for permission to conduct three non-aviation degree programs there. The aviation program, which enrolled about 300 students in the mid-1990s, now has about 75. Vincennes officials blame the United Airlines Maintenance hub closure, which displaced 1,200...
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Rose-Hulman looks ahead: Search for new president could take a yearRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
But trustees currently have a higher priority: Let the dust settle. "It's only been a couple of days," said Rose-Hulman Chairman Robert Bright. "Nothing's been established for sure yet." It took the Terre Haute engineering school 10 months to find and narrow the field of 60 candidates that produced Midgley-nearly the length of his presidential stint. Most expect the search for his successor to last at least as long. In the meantime, Rose-Hulman has a more pressing task. It must...
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Phone-system expert answers entrepreneurial call: Via savvy marketing, she turned her knowledge of telecommunications into a thriving consulting businessRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Susan Raccoli
When Barb Grothe said goodbye to her paycheck and job security 19 years ago, she was just a little scared and wondered, "Now what do I do?" She had office space for her new telecommunications consulting company, Telecom Resources, and 15 years of experience, but no clients. So she went about making herself known: she wrote articles for magazines, newspapers and journals (including IBJ) and scheduled speaking engagements. Almost each venture produced new clients, and Grothe was on her way....
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Shrinkage a growing problem: Manufacturers seek ways to stem product lossesRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
The U.S. manufacturing industry has begun rebounding from its economic swoon, but some industry experts think more manufacturers must become more efficient and eliminate waste if they are to compete in the current global climate. While the Manufacturers Alliance, an Arlington, Va.-based business and public policy research group, projected manufacturing growth of 3.4 percent this year and 3 percent in 2006, big challenges remain. One growing problem is the so-called shrinkage factor, defined in manufacturing as the percentage by which...
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