Technology

St. Vincent buys land near Lafayette for hospital: Market has long intrigued Indianapolis-based networkRestricted Content

February 28, 2005
Tom Murphy
St. Vincent Health paid Arnett Health-System $3 million to $4 million for land Arnett owned along Interstate 65 in Tippecanoe County, said Rebecca Carl, Arnett vice president for marketing and communications. The two sides closed the deal in mid-February. Lafayette-based Arnett includes a health care plan and a physician group of 150 doctors, and covers a 14-county area centered on Lafayette. Its leaders want another hospital there even though Lafayette already has two, Home Hospital and St. Elizabeth Medical Center....
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OneAmerica grows bullish on its future: New leadership hopes to sustain steady growthRestricted Content

February 21, 2005
Tom Murphy
OneAmerica Financial Partners Inc. kept busy with a brand change, a record year for retirement services and the arrival of several new leaders in 2004. New President and CEO Dayton Molendorp plans to keep the positive momentum flowing with 34 key projects outlined in the 2005 business plan. But analysts say the Indianapolis company will have to grow in the face of strong competition and a pressing need to keep up with technology. The company formerly known as AUL unveiled...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Some suggestions on how to overcome spamRestricted Content

February 21, 2005
Tim Altom
Some time back, I got onto the solicitation no-call list maintained by the state of Indiana. It's the second-best decision I ever made, after proposing to my wife. My evenings are ring-free, blessedly non-commercial, aside from the ads that overly optimistic marketing people hope I'll watch on TV. There should be a similar no-call list for spammers, but there isn't. Spam, as you probably know, is unwanted e-mail. Spam requires a lot of time every day to find, sort and...
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Eco suit spawns flurry of litigation: Class actions hit Honeywell in wake of thermostat fightRestricted Content

February 14, 2005
Greg Andrews
Industrial powerhouse Honeywell International Inc. suddenly finds itself under siege by an army of aggressive class-action attorneys-all because it decided to mess with a couple of determined entrepreneurs from Lebanon. Attorneys from around the nation in recent months have filed six class action lawsuits in state courts charging New Jersey-based Honeywell used deception to obtain the trademark for its ubiquitous round thermostat, then used its lock on the round-thermostat market to overcharge customers. T h e l eg a l...
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Head of IT firm ensures company primed for growth: She started business to offer customized training but altered her strategy as circumstances changed Strategic decisions "She almost vibrates" Female support

February 14, 2005
Kathy Maeglin
Kathy Carrier's dad was angry when she left a lucrative job at a Fortune 500 company to start her own firm. But four years later, when she won an Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award, he told his daughter: "Clearly your vision for yourself was greater than the one I had for you." In less than seven years, Carrier, 46, has built her Fort Wayne-based information technology writing and training firm, Briljent LLC, into a business with annual...
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BULLS & BEARS: How managing investments works from the top downRestricted Content

February 14, 2005
Ken Skarbeck
Another variation of the asset allocation and diversification theme that is common on Wall Street is what's called a "topdown" investment strategy to manage a portfolio. Investors who practice this sort of money management are generally more concerned with the economic outlook and its effect on various "market sectors" than the business fundamentals of a particular company. The Standard & Poor's 500 index is the most commonly used measuring stick for the investment performance of many mutual funds and money...
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New-technology veterans take hands-on approach: West Lafayette's IN-vivo Ventures aids startupsRestricted Content

February 14, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Spinning out university research to form new companies is a tricky proposition. But the partners who formed West Lafayette-based IN-vivo Ventures believe they can show would-be academic entrepreneurs what's behind the curtain. "If an entrepreneur is looking for funding, that's not what IN-vivo's about," said co-founder Chad Barden. "What we are about is identifying good, strong commercial opportunities that lack a business focus, and inventors who lack the business expertise to take it to market." Every day, scientists and engineers...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Do cell-phone calls trump talking person-to-person?Restricted Content

February 7, 2005
Tim Altom
I've been watching the wireless revolution in business, and I'm fascinated by how people are fitting technology into etiquette. For example, in one recent meeting, I saw people jumping up and down like a Whacka-Mole game, scuttling from the room each time their cell phones commanded them to. The phones were muted, so nobody heard the rings, but it's not conducive to coherence in a meeting to have people running in and out like the Secret Service at a state...
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NASCAR fuels C&R growth: Maker of custom racing parts diversifies from open-wheel rootsRestricted Content

February 7, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Though he's only 45, Chris Paulsen is a grizzled veteran in racing circles. The storied mechanic has already been invited to take part in old-timer events at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. But industry sources say Paulsen's future is as wide open and promising as that of a schoolboy with a fresh diploma. The innovations that made him a household name in open-wheel have earned a following among NASCAR's elite, and the insightful entrepreneur even talks of starting his own race...
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Special Report: MURKY MISSION: Vague directive dilutes 21st Century Fund's high-tech impactRestricted Content

February 7, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
When directors of Indiana's 21st Century Research and Technology Fund convened in May 2003, they'd already doled out $70 million in state grants over three years to fund h i g h - t e c h innovation a n d w e r e preparing to u n l e a s h another $60 million. But you wouldn't know it after reading minutes from that meeting. They show a rollicking debate broke out over the 21st Century's Fund's...
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Movie theater ads spark big-screen debate: Appeal of captive audience and demographics push advertising sales to record levels, prompting backlashRestricted Content

February 7, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Ron Keedy can be found taking tickets, popping popcorn and sweeping floors at Key Cinemas on Indianapolis' south side. There's little Keedy won't do to build customer loyalty at the two-screen cinema he owns. What he won't do is sell advertisements to go along with the first-run, often offbeat films he shows. Keedy thinks movies are art, and there's no place for commercial ads in the art his patrons pay to see. "Maybe I'm a purist," Keedy said. "I feel...
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European firm plants local roots in patient technology: Company to start Indianapolis operation after testRestricted Content

February 7, 2005
Tom Murphy
A British company has picked Methodist Hospital and Indianapolis as the birthing ground for a new way to monitor patients using technology inspired by jet engines. Oxford BioSignals Ltd. hopes to roll out its BioSign technology by the end of this year, but the Rolls-Royce partner won't leave the city after testing ends. The company also plans to start business operations here, much to the delight of those nurturing the life sciences industry. BioSignals will begin testing its BioSign product...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Telecom regulation takes center stage at StatehouseRestricted Content

February 7, 2005
Ed Feigenbaum
While this session will, necessarily and constitutionally, be all about the budget, you can expect a few interesting stops during the long journey to that point. Even as the House Ways and Means Committee was hearing last week from assorted state agencies about their respective budget needs, other lawmakers were hearing from Hoosiers more interested in altering state policy than what the state's fiscal bottom line might be. And just like the governor will be distracted this week-as he should...
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Portal plan targets humanities teachers: Technology offers access to data, lesson-planningRestricted Content

February 7, 2005
Ed Callahan
The Indiana Humanities Council wants to open a new doorway for teachers around the state. IHC has begun testing a trial version of an education-portal program called Smart-Desktop at six central Indiana schools, including three from IPS. The goal of the program is to help teachers teach traditional humanities subjects such as history, social science and literature more efficiently and effectively, said John Keller, teacher-designer and coordinator of K-12 development for the Smart-Desktop initiative. Starting Feb. 1, more than 30...
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BEHIND THE NEWS: REIT run leaves analysts 'worried and optimistic'Ex-executive settles with SECRestricted Content

January 31, 2005
Greg Andrews
Mall developer Simon Property Group Inc. and many of the nation's other top real estate investment trusts have earned investors huge returns since 2000, so huge that continued gains seem unlikely. Or do they? That's the million-dollar question as investors close the book on 2004, one of the best years in the history of REITs. For the 12 months, Simon posted a total return of 47 percent, while REITs overall returned 31 percent. It was the fifth straight year REITs...
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Sale of parent company brings local agency growth: Roman Brand nets record billings year after buyoutRestricted Content

January 31, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Fourteen months after parting from Bates USA, Roman Brand Group is growing quickly. With its new name and a pledge from its new parent company to give the local firm more control, the advertising agency increased revenue 15 percent and added 17 new clients in 2004. Roman Brand CEO Dan Roman projects similar growth in 2005 as a wholly owned subsidiary of London-based WPP Group and its U.S. advertising agency J. Walter Thompson. WPP Group bought Bates' former parent company,...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Testing is secret to worthwhile Web site tinkeringRestricted Content

January 24, 2005
Tim Altom
I've just been reading yet another article giving advice for building commercial Web sites. It's by a recognized authority named Saul Carliner, at Boxes and Arrows (www.boxesandarrows.com), itself a pretty venerable site for Web-site builders. The article draws parallels between brick-and-mortar retail stores and Web sites. For example, Carliner recommends that your site give some personal customer attention, because that's how retailers like Nordstrom have become so successful. Store success, Web success. The implication is simple. Except that it's not....
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Indy heart care offerings expand once again: St. Francis polishes cardiac and vascular centerRestricted Content

January 24, 2005
Tom Murphy
Furniture movers and technology testers have taken center stage as St. Francis Hospital and Health Centers prepares to become the latest Indianapolis provider to flex its cardiac care muscle. On March 1, St. Francis will accept the first patient for a $70 million Cardiac Vascular Care Center addition to its south campus. The new center will include an operating room with the latest electronic connections to patient information among other selling points. One item it won't provide is a conclusive...
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Terminal move might spur land rush: Midfield project to free choice real estateRestricted Content

January 24, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Overshadowed by the $974 million midfield terminal project is a potential economic development bonanza: the reuse of the existing terminal and surrounding land at Indianapolis International Airport. More than 120 acres along Interstate 465 that today hold parked cars might someday house hotels, shipping operations or even a light-rail station after the midfield terminal opens in about three years. Another 54 acres representing the terminal and its immediate surroundings will be available for aviation uses from air freight to corporate...
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Incubator shakeup puts prez under fire: Rose-Hulman Ventures in turmoil after resignationsRestricted Content

January 24, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
But outside his camp, others at Rose-Hulman are calling for Midgley's scalp. They fear the man who replaced Samuel Hulbert in July is another George Armstrong Custer. A pair of sudden resignations at nationally renowned business incubator Rose-Hulman Ventures provoked the skirmish that now threatens to become an all-out assault on Midgley's leadership. "We cannot trust him," said a Rose-Hulman dean who spoke on condition of anonymity. "This is by far not the only time I have felt this way,...
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Indiana IPOs break out of recent slump: Kite Realty, Republic Airways, Adesa among 5 state firms to test public watersRestricted Content

January 24, 2005
Scott Olson
Hoosier-based companies registered five initial public offerings last year, a robust number considering not a single Indiana business went public in 2003. The uptick could signal the state's economy, as well as the nation's, is on the mend. Nationally, 233 companies raised $43 billion collectively to go public on the major U.S. stock exchanges in 2004, a 195-percent increase in the number of IPOs over 2003. And the performance could be even stronger this year, said Richard Peterson, a market...
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VIEWPOINT: We stand on the shoulders of black business giantsRestricted Content

January 24, 2005
Jesse L.
In a recent conversation with a family member regarding the lack of African-American businesses in the high technology, life sciences and larger manufacturing arenas, I began to wonder, "What are the barriers that prevent African-Americans from entering business? Are conditions worse now than in the past when we seemed to have greater representation in these areas?" Some will say it is the lack of access to capital. Some will point to the continued aura of racism and prejudice, while still...
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VIEWPOINT: We're trying to save the wrong brainsRestricted Content

January 17, 2005
Bruce R.
I always wonder what people are talking about when they lament Indiana's "brain drain." Statistics usually follow, detailing the college graduates taking jobs in other states. It is perhaps a contrarian's viewpoint, but we should, in fact, encourage these young people to go seek their fortunes. The fact that they are leaving is a symptom, not the problem. Our problem is there are not enough Hoosiers who can create the jobs that could employ our young graduates. We do have...
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Purdue, IU out to bolster their life sciences futures: Both universities invest millions in biomedical pursuits Grants help growth 'A new kind of engineer'Restricted Content

January 17, 2005
Brent Adams
Whenever Indiana and Purdue universities get together on the hardwood or the debate arena, the rivalry is intense. But as various public and private players around the state put on a full-court press for Indiana's life sciences future, the schools have teamed up like a dynamic backcourt duo. The Scientist, a biweekly publication delivered to 75,000 people worldwide, in November ranked Purdue No. 2 and Indiana No. 10 on a list of "Best Places to Work in Academia," based on...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Technology advances provide Daniels with opportunityRestricted Content

January 17, 2005
Ed Feigenbaum
Indiana's new governor will obviously have the opportunity to shape a new government and plans to do so. But what has been unsaid about what the new structure may look like is how our assumptions about government and the delivery of government services have changed so radically since the last party change in the office in 1988, and even since the last election. The growth of the Internet and public acceptance of doing business online has Hoosiers now expecting that...
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