Technology

Doctors should adapt to ratingsRestricted Content

April 13, 2009
Rating doctors via online services helps consumers make better health care decisions.
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Doc sues Web-savvy ex-patientRestricted Content

April 13, 2009
J.K. Wall
Dr. Barry Eppley, an Indianapolis surgeon, says an online crusade by a disgruntled former patient is taking a toll on his practice, and he's suing her.
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There's more to 'tweets' than meets the eyeRestricted Content

April 13, 2009
Tim Altom
I'm starting to rethink my initial reaction to dismiss Twitter and now see its benefits to gauging opinion, as well as gathering ideas and doing research.
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Omnicity seeks financial turnaround, has 28 acquisitions in mind

April 13, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Dick Beltzhoover, a private investor in Omnicity Corp., a Carmel-based wireless broadband provider, has quietly taken the company public and has lofty plans to expand nationwide.
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Fools log in: Google leads the pack in April gagsRestricted Content

April 6, 2009
Jim Cota

Every year, as the first of April rolls around, there are people—and companies—everywhere scheming to take advantage of the gullible.

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Here's how to unlock the secrets of PDFsRestricted Content

March 30, 2009
Tim Altom
PDFs are still a mystery to many business folk, even those who routinely receive them and read them.
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Quest for new rocket fuel leads scientists to kitchenRestricted Content

March 16, 2009
Sam Stall
At Purdue University, the quest for a new missile and spacecraft fuel has brought together an oil-and-vinegar mix of rocket scientists and food scientists.
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Proprietary developments withering from recessionRestricted Content

March 16, 2009
Scott Olson
Financing is the lifeblood of companies turning intellectual property into a product or service, but turbulent economic conditions have made it increasingly difficult to raise cash from investors who are content to wait out the storm by concentrating on their existing portfolios.
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Health care IT firms rushing to grab share of stimulusRestricted Content

March 9, 2009
J.K. Wall
The stimulus bill has prompted Indiana businesses and not-for-profits that deal in medical records to look for partners to help them meet the challenge of making those records electronic in five years.
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Brightpoint adjusts as wireless demand finally cools offRestricted Content

March 2, 2009
Chris O'Malley
After years of torrid gains in the number of wireless phones it handles, Brightpoint has had two consecutive comparable-quarter declines.
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Creative Street scores with online educationRestricted Content

March 2, 2009
Anthony Schoettle
The rising popularity of online education is ringing up sales for a local firm better known for video production.
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Rolls-Royce unveils engineRestricted Content

March 2, 2009
Rolls-Royce is courting customers for its RR500TS helicopter engine, unveiled recently at Heli-Expo in Anaheim, Calif.
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When is it time to chuck old computer equipment?Restricted Content

March 2, 2009
Tim Altom
If a computer-related device still works without any tinkering, I'm inclined to keep it.
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YouTube isn't the only place to watch, share videosRestricted Content

March 2, 2009
Jim Cota
Try out Vimeo (www.vimeo. com) and blip.tv as alternatives to YouTube.
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Conventions going high-tech with RFIDRestricted Content

February 23, 2009
Anthony Schoettle

Radio frequency identification—better known as RFID—is making its way to trade shows and conventions, providing a plethora of information about attendees.

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Community Health touts integrated computer systemRestricted Content

February 23, 2009
Community Health Network has spent three years developing a computer interface that allows doctors and nurses to view all information and records on a patient in one viewing program.
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Compendium casts eye on national blog marketRestricted Content

February 23, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Two-year-old tech startup Compendium Blogware has launched its first out-of-state sales force and said it signed on 70 new customers in the fourth quarter.
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Privacy, expense are concerns for RFID technologyRestricted Content

February 23, 2009
Anthony Schoettle
The vast amounts of personal information capable of being stored through RFID raises privacy concerns. And the cost is significantly greater than standard bar codes.
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Use your cell phone as a tracking deviceRestricted Content

February 16, 2009
Tim Altom
My dream application for a cell phone is to use it to locate a person in a crowd.
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Fast-growing Tuitive seeks to put unintuitive programmers in back seat of software, Web designRestricted Content

February 16, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Jonathan Arnold sees big business potential in his firm "Tuitive," which specializes in cleaning up the confusion caused by programmers, who often put features and functionality ahead of making their product intuitive to use.
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Advanced energy next focus for economic developmentRestricted Content

February 16, 2009
Chris O'Malley
The Central Indiana Corporate Partnership—the parent of the BioCrossroads, TechPoint and Conexus industry cluster initiatives—let it be known last month that there would be a fourth leg to its economic development stool: clean technology.
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Automation hitting new levels at distribution centersRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
Sam Stall
In early April, the 110,000-square-foot Indianapolis distribution center of California-based medical-device supplier DJO Inc. will quietly roll out a revolutionary automated package-handling system.
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NASA contracts soaringRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
Chris O'Malley
NASA begins to award more grants to Indiana firms and universities.
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Purdue researchers tweak CT scanners to help lumber industry find knots, cracks, decay in treesRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
Scott Olson
CT scanners have been used for decades to peer inside humans. Now a Purdue University researcher is training the technology on hardwood trees to help lumber mills get the most value from logs.
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Battle plan for 11-year-old, veteran-owned company includes adding 100 workers, second Lawrence officeRestricted Content

February 2, 2009
Chris O'Malley
A company founded by military veterans that performs database administration for clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to the U.S. Department of Defense is adding a second office in Lawrence and plans to hire about 100 more people over the next two years, doubling its staff.
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  1. Looking at the two companies - in spite of their relative size to one another -- Ricker's image is (by all accounts) pretty solid and reputable. Their locations are clean, employees are friendly and the products they offer are reasonably priced. By contrast, BP locations are all over the place and their reputation is poor, especially when you consider this is the same "company" whose disastrous oil spill and their response was nothing short of irresponsible should tell you a lot. The fact you also have people who are experienced in franchising saying their system/strategy is flawed is a good indication that another "spill" has occurred and it's the AM-PM/Ricker's customers/company that are having to deal with it.

  2. Daniel Lilly - Glad to hear about your points and miles. Enjoy Wisconsin and Illinois. You don't care one whit about financial discipline, which is why you will blast the "GOP". Classic liberalism.

  3. Isn't the real reason the terrain? The planners under-estimated the undulating terrain, sink holes, karst features, etc. This portion of the route was flawed from the beginning.

  4. You thought no Indy was bad, how's no fans working out for you? THe IRl No direct competition and still no fans. Hey George Family, spend another billion dollars, that will fix it.

  5. I live downtown Indy and had to be in downtown Chicago for a meeting. In other words, I am the target demographic for this train. It leaves at 6:00-- early but doable. Then I saw it takes 5+ hours. No way. I drove. I'm sure I paid 3 to 5 times as much once you factor in gas, parking, and tolls, but it was reimbursed so not a factor for me. Any business traveler is going to take the option that gets there quickly and reliably... and leisure travelers are going to take the option that has a good schedule and promotional prices (i.e., Megabus). Indy to Chicago is the right distance (too short to fly but takes several hours to drive) that this train could be extremely successful even without subsidies, if they could figure out how to have several frequencies (at least 3x/day) and make the trip in a reasonable amount of time. For those who have never lived on the east coast-- Amtrak is the #1 choice for NY-DC and NY-Boston. They have the Acela service, it runs almost every hour, and it takes you from downtown to downtown. It beats driving and flying hands down. It is too bad that we cannot build something like this in the midwest, at least to connect the bigger cities.

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