Tourism & Hospitality

ROSE awards ceremonies honor hospitality workers: Eleven employees commended for top-level serviceRestricted Content

April 2, 2007
Staff Report
After the passing of the restaurant's general manager, "Mama" stepped into the grief-filled void, providing leadership while consoling the staff. During a charity silent auction, Camerone auctioned off herself as an inhome chef for an evening. She ended up generating the most proceeds, enough to make a dream come true for a child during the Make-a-Wish Telethon. Pamela Evans, customer service agent, American Airlines Evans is a customer service agent for American Airlines and her territory often can be among...
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Red Hat Society over-50 women pursued by marketersRestricted Content

March 12, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Members of the Red Hat Society get together monthly to celebrate life after 50, a demographic marketers often overlook. But these women-and their spending habits-are attracting attention as the California-based club gains traction.
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Mansur lands $50M midfield airport hotelRestricted Content

March 12, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
The Indianapolis Airport Authority has tapped Mansur Real Estate Services Inc. to develop a $50 million-plus Westin hotel at the new midfield terminal. But the hotel's final design may be one submitted by a former competitor, White Lodging Corp. of South Bend.
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: IMA art park is a grand slamRestricted Content

March 5, 2007
Lest we overlook it among the rash of crimes, stock-market gyrations and General Assembly shenanigans reported in the media recently, the Indianapolis Museum of Art deserves some major kudos. Amid the chaos, the IMA announced the names of the 10 artists, artists' groups and architects who will create works for its Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park set to open in 2009. It was a grand slam. Unveiled in New York Feb. 27, the list includes individuals or collectives...
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Hotel veteran launches own firm: A Q&A with local hospitality leader Tim WorthingtonRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
Cory Schouten
While he was a student at Indiana University, Tim Worthington spent summers washing dishes, cooking breakfast and delivering room service for locally based General Hotels Corp. It was the beginning of a 31-year career that would include 14 years as president of the company. Worthington, 60, retired last February but quickly realized he wanted back in the action. So he and partner Michael Arnold, also a former employee at General Hotels and a 20-year veteran of the hotel industry, launched...
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Super Bowl travel plans mix business, funRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Cory Schouten
Super Bowl XLI has become a can't-miss event for dozens of local business executives and government honchos, who are shelling out several thousand dollars apiece to watch the Feb. 4 game in person.
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Greetings from Indianapolis SouthRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
NAPLES, Fla.-Here I am more than 1,000 miles from Indianapolis and yet feeling right at home. Seems like everywhere I turn, there are signs of the city. The first night I was here, I ate dinner at a restaurant where six Indianapolis people I know were sitting at the table next to ours. During the course of my stay so far, American United Life Insurance Co. held a board retreat here and the St. Vincent Hospital Foundation threw a fund-raiser...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Mirror, mirror, which is fairest tax of all?Restricted Content

January 15, 2007
Morton Marcus
With some hesitation, I take you inside the men's rest room at the Statehouse. There, I found a new member of the General Assembly combing his hair over his otherwise empty scalp and asking, "Mirror, mirror on the wall, which is the fairest tax of all?" The mirror responded, "The sales tax is the fairest of them all." Startled, both the legislator and I looked around, only to hear another mirror say, "No, the income tax is fairest of them...
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Labor sector diversification could spur local economy: $200,000 study targets finance, retail and constructionRestricted Content

January 8, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Sexier industry sectors like life sciences or motorsports get all the press. But to remain robust, the Indianapolis Private Industry Council believes, the area economy needs diversification. The 23-year-old work-force-training not-for-profit believes the nine-county area also should target three tried-and-true industries: finance and insurance; retail, hospitality and restaurants; and construction. IPIC, whose $9 million annual budget comes from public and private grants, plans to spend $200,000 during the first quarter studying the three sectors, which collectively employ 270,000 people in...
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EYE ON THE PIE: In 2007, sweat the little thingsRestricted Content

January 8, 2007
Morton Marcus
This time of the year, serious people make serious resolutions about important matters; people like me, experienced and lacking determination, avoid resolutions. If, however, I were to recommend resolutions to business and government leaders, my list could be condensed into this: Attend to the little things. For too long, we have heard the preaching of management gurus and public-policy mavens that we must keep our eyes focused on the bigger issues. If you are a decision maker, you are supposed...
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Circle Truss proposed as gateway landmarkRestricted Content

January 1, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
The Arch welcomes visitors to St. Louis. San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge ushers in the masses. And soon the Circle Gateway Truss could greet travelers entering downtown Indianapolis.
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Stadium walkway carries $10M tabRestricted Content

December 18, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
An enclosed connector is set to be built, partly underground, that will link Lucas Oil Stadium to the soon-to-be expanded Indiana Convention Center. It will span about a quarter of a mile and cost more than $10 million.
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Residents say safety is a growing concern: Survey: Fewer feel comfortable downtown after darkRestricted Content

December 11, 2006
Cory Schouten
Most central Indiana residents feel safe in downtown Indianapolis when the sun is out, but remain leery of the city at night, according to a study by the IUPUI Department of Tourism, Conventions and Event Management. The annual study, which is designed to gauge the impact of cultural tourism on quality of life, gives the city high marks overall in areas ranging from cultural attractions to cleanliness, public transportation to parking. But it also shows the city has more work...
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Agreement forces INDOT to clean rest areasRestricted Content

December 4, 2006
Chris O'Malley
Many of Indiana's 36 rest areas have in recent years dumped illegal amounts of ammonia nitrogen and E.coli bacteria into nearby streams, state records show.
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Cable company rolls out on-demand advertising: Comcast already has signed deal with General MotorsRestricted Content

November 6, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
People don't typically pay for on-demand cable so that they can look at advertisements, but Comcast thinks they will. It's trying to turn an old axiom-that people avoid advertising like the plague-on its ear. The Philadelphia-based company that provides cable television in much of Marion County thinks its new on-demand advertising-launched earlier this fall-will be so popular, viewers will seek out the pitches. For Comcast digital cable subscribers, accessing on-demand ads is as easy as going to their video on-demand...
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Kite, Mansur, White pitch airport hotelRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Three developers are vying for the chance to build a four-story, 250- to 300-room hotel connected to the new $974 million midfield terminal and garage at the Indianapolis International Airport.
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Chamber of Commerce explores casino recommendationRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
To shore up local government's enormous financial shortfalls, the Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce has begun investigating whether it wants to push for a downtown casino--a politically explosive idea that would face widespread opposition.
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New Ambassadair owner drops dues, brings back chartersRestricted Content

September 11, 2006
Chris O'Malley
The new owner of Ambassadair travel club has eliminated membership fees and will add a flurry of charter flights in January under a plan to revive an Indianapolis institution that shuttled thousands of Hoosiers around the globe for 34 years.
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IUPUI's tourism department luring hundreds of students: City's convention industry, program's focus on meeting planning make department fastest growing on campusRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
After Kelly Sernau earned an associate in arts degree in hospitality at Michigan State University, she began researching schools that offered a bachelor's degree in the field. She considered staying in her home state, then researched schools in Chicago and other places. Ultimately, she opted to transfer to IUPUI's Department of Tourism, Conventions and Event Management within the School of Physical Education and Tourism Management. "I wanted to focus on meeting planning, [but] most programs focus on the hotel aspect...
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Farming for tourists on the rise: Wine trails find followersRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Scott Olson
Whether you prefer a Chardonnay or Merlot, or you're simply trying to recall the opening lyrics to "Scenes From an Italian Restaurant," one thing is certain: Indiana wineries are hardly withering on the vine. The Hoosier State now boasts 32 wineries and should add two more by the end of fall, according to the Indiana Wine Grape Council at Purdue University. Moreover, the winemakers are helping drive the state's fledgling agri-tourism efforts. "Nobody wants to tour a hog farm, but...
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Indiana encourages agri-tourism efforts:Restricted Content

July 31, 2006
Scott Olson
For Cliff Carley, Sept. 11, 2001, is a date of great personal significance unrelated to tragic events. That's the day the construction company owner bought a pair of Rocky Mountain elk and began raising the large deer on his northern Hamilton County property near Atlanta. Nearly five years later, Carley Elk Farm hosts Saturday tours for which visitors pay $5 to roam the rural acreage and help feed a herd that numbers about 50. On the way home, they can...
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Concierge helps famous, fashionable: Conrad job gets exciting during big eventsRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
It looked like a photo shoot for GQ or Elle. Guests wore denim that probably won't show up in American stores until next year, if even then. Other guests checking into the Conrad Indianapolis for the July 2 U.S. Grand Prix wore sparkling diamonds and designer apparel. They carried Coach handbags of all shapes and sizes, setting them on the concierge desk as they awaited delivery of their luggage. Without fail, Lynna Mills would peek around the bags and cordially...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Tale of 2 bridges has deeper meaningRestricted Content

June 26, 2006
Morton Marcus
Two bridges at opposite ends of the state are of concern to neighboring citizens and all Hoosiers. Both are historic steel-truss bridges. One spans the Wabash River connecting New Harmony (Posey County) with White County, Ill. The second spans the Gibson rail yard in Hammond (Lake County) and carries the traffic of busy Indianapolis Boulevard. Both bridges are in poor condition. The Indiana Department of Transportation has recommendations for both bridges. Local officials are opposed to the INDOT plans. Whose...
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FUNNY BUSINESS: 'Restart Your Engines'-we have refrigerator magnets

May 15, 2006
Mike Redmond
I'm not sensing a lot of enthusiasm for the state's new tourism slogan, "Restart Your Engines." Wait. What am I saying? What I sense is some outright hostility because the state paid $85,000 for this clunker, then was so tone deaf as to unveil it right after the income tax deadline, setting off a wave of "Your tax dollars at work" jokes in newspapers, blogs and coffee shops. So here we are in May, at the start of another tourist...
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Battle of the brands: Planners go back to drawing board after city slogan nixedRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Matthew Kish
They thought they had a winner with The New Midwest. They even had the logo-a stylized "I"-all figured out. And a color palette. But then they hit a bump in the road. When Mark Miles became CEO of the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership in January, he joined the big group and said the slogan was a dud. At the least, he said, participants should run it by focus groups. They only had to run it by two before they realized...
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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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