Tourism Groups

Indiana tourism trade group adopts new name

June 9, 2014
Associated Press
The Association of Indiana Convention and Visitors Bureaus will now be called the Indiana Tourism Association.
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Indy an underdog in final push to capture 2018 Super Bowl

May 20, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
New Orleans has emerged as the front runner to host the Super Bowl in 2018 due to its tricentennial celebration and the fact that this could be 87-year-old Saints owner Tom Benson's last crack at hosting the big game.
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Fairgrounds officials pushing for coliseum sponsorship

April 24, 2014
Jeff Newman
The Fairgrounds Coliseum, which reopens Thursday after a $63 million renovation, is likely to receive a new name soon, an Indiana State Fair Commission spokesman said.
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Firefighter convention expecting record attendance

April 9, 2014
Associated Press
A record-breaking 32,000 firefighters are expected at the annual event, which started Monday and runs through Saturday at the Indiana Convention Center.
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New state slogan clashes with city goal of cosmopolitan imageRestricted Content

February 28, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
The state tourism department’s new tag line, “Honest to Goodness Indiana,” is so folksy that some wonder whether there’s a disconnect between what it says about the state and how the city of Indianapolis is trying to distinguish itself.
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Hamilton County tourism agency changes name

February 28, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
Starting Monday, the Hamilton County Convention and Visitors Bureau will change its name to Hamilton County Tourism Inc. to better reflect its mission.
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Danville to channel TV's Mayberry during 2-day festival

February 25, 2014
 IBJ Staff
Hendricks County will serve up a heaping helping of nostalgia this spring with a festival devoted to "The Andy Griffith Show."
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No foolin': New state tourism pitch is 'Honest to Goodness'

February 12, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
The new tourism slogan, which replaces "Restart your engines," is the hook for a widescale state rebranding campaign.
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Visit Indy to map city's strategy for tourism

February 10, 2014
Anthony Schoetle
The $178,000 study will answer key questions about how the city can better connect its highlights, attract and please business and leisure travelers, and hook up with corporate partners.
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National Rifle Association convention debuts in Indy

February 8, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
Businesses are scrambling to decide how to cater to the massive confab.
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Tourism makes up state’s sixth largest industry, study says

December 18, 2013
Jacie Shoaf, The Statehouse File
The industry maintains nearly 140,000 jobs and contributes $10 billion in revenue to Indiana businesses, according to a new report.
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Hamilton County tourism getting sweeping updateRestricted Content

November 9, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
Officials tout sophistication, Internet focus in attempt to shed folksy image.
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Indianapolis named finalist for 2018 Super Bowl

October 8, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
Indy joins Minneapolis and New Orleans as the three NFL cities invited to bid on the big game. The 2012 Super Bowl had a $176 million direct economic impact on the city, a study said.
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Crafting Indianapolis' convention biz took guts

September 28, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
Ex-Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association chief Bill McGowan weighs the pay-off.
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Long way to go to fill expanded Indiana Convention CenterRestricted Content

September 28, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
Eighteen months after the expansion opened, indicators of success are mixed.
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'Dynamic duo' boosts Hamilton County tourismRestricted Content

September 28, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
In eight years with the Hamilton County Convention and Visitors Bureau, Executive Director Brenda Myers has morphed her organization into a developer, grant giver and landlord. The strategy appears to be working.
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Ticket brokers, city to take lumps as IU sent east

March 18, 2013
Anthony Schoettle
Ticket brokers took a gut punch Sunday when NCAA officials announced that Indiana University would not be playing in the Midwest Regional of the men's basketball tournament. Local tourism officials say the economic impact could drop $1.5 million.
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State hotels see rise in annual occupancy rate

February 21, 2013
Indiana’s hotels hosted more visitors last year, according to a survey by Hendersonville-based Smith Travel Research.
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City’s tourism agency reports strong 2012

January 9, 2013
Scott Olson
Indianapolis' hosting of the Super Bowl last February seems to be paying off for Visit Indy, which says the exposure the city received from the game is translating into more visitor interest.
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Car-rental companies say higher tax will hurt locals, too

January 8, 2013
Scott Olson
Indianapolis is poised to raise its tax on car rentals, drawing the ire of the auto-rental industry. Though local politicians routinely say such taxes hurt only visitors, more than half of car rentals are actually local, industry figures show.
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Potential of higher car rental taxes drawing fire

December 10, 2012
Associated Press
People who come to Indianapolis for business, ball games or other reasons could pay more for their visits if local officials decide to raise taxes on car rentals and professional sports tickets early next year.
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Tourism generated $4B for city last year, study says

December 6, 2012
A study released Thursday says the tourism industry in Indianapolis had an economic impact of nearly $4 billion in 2011, a 10-percent increase from the previous year.
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Nation’s largest motorsports trade show returning to city

November 20, 2012
Scott Olson
The Performance Racing Industry Show will return to Indianapolis for five years starting in 2013, bringing about 40,000 guests and millions of dollars of visitor spending with it.
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Big Easy bests Indy in all but promo costs and visitorsRestricted Content

November 10, 2012
A comparison of Indianapolis and New Orleans as tourism and convention cities.
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Music education group to remain in city through 2023

November 8, 2012
 IBJ Staff
Indianapolis-based not-for-profit Music for All, which puts on the annual Bands of America competition, announced Thursday that it plans to keep its headquarters and events in Indianapolis through 2023.
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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

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  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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