Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Brainard defends Keystone projectRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
Carmel Mayor James Brainard is trying to convince his city to pay up to $52 million more than the original amount allocated for a roundabout interchange project designed to ease congestion on Keystone Avenue.
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Langham lands airport dealRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
An arm of locally based Langham Logistics has won a 40-month, $3.28 million contract to provide logistics services at the new Indianapolis International Airport terminal.
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Let's use old terminal for distribution hubRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Brian Williams
The city should organize a public-private partnership to create a multi-modal distribution community at the site of the former Indianapolis Airport terminal.
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Baker and Daniels creates logistics practice with 20 plus attorneysRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Indianapolis law firm Baker & Daniels LLP has formed an advanced manufacturing and logistics practice to be headed by partner James S. Birge.
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Airport terminal to rent out space, keep many employees in old facilityRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Chris O'Malley
The new, $1.1 billion terminal at Indianapolis International Airport likely won't house as many airport employees as the existing facility. Instead, portions of the terminal are being set aside for their revenue-generating potential.
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Indianapolis Airport opening good news for local PR, hospitality firmsRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Chris O'Malley
In the last two months, the Indianapolis Airport Authority board has approved spending at least $850,000 toward grand-opening parties for the new airport terminal and events in the form of contracts with caterers, event planners and public relations firms.
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Heritage CEO to chair transportation associationRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
Charles F. Potts, the CEO of Indianapolis-based Heritage Construction, will serve as 2009 chairman of the American Road & Transportation Builders Association.
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Hawker Beechcraft Corp. at work on $14 million expansion of its airport terminal facilityRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
Hawker Beechcraft Corp. has begun work on a $14 million expansion of its terminal and aircraft service facility at Indianapolis International Airport.
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Leaders analyze Denver's commuter transitRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
Chris O'Malley
 Sixty Indianapolis-area business and civic leaders visited Denver Oct. 19-21 as part of the Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce 2008 Leadership Exchange and paid close attention to public transportation, especially commuter trains.
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New rail route connects Hendricks to West Coast: Line should bolster county's distribution industryRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Sam Stall
A new rail route launched last month between Los Angeles and CSX's Avon rail yard could give a further boost to Hendricks County's booming warehousing-and-distribution industry. The county already hosts some 29 million square feet of warehouse space. However, it lacked a direct connection to the teeming Port of Long Beach in Los Angeles, a major gateway for U.S./ Asian trade. Anyone in the Hendricks County area wishing to send or receive goods from that port by rail had to...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: What Halloween can teach us about economicsRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Mike Hicks
The week of Halloween at the Hicks household is also the week we learn about taxes. It is a natural combination-they are both kind of scary and involve giving up something you've worked for to someone else. Having three kids of different ages and interests is especially instructive. My fourth-grader is all about the experience of trick or treating with friends. She is likely to savor every minute chatting, holding hands and skipping along. She is not trying to maximize...
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Flat passenger counts not seen as threat to paying debt on midfield terminalRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Chris O\'malley

The big debt payments on the $1.1 billion midfield terminal at Indianapolis International Airport start coming due in January--just as a recession hits and the battered airline industry cuts capacity. Despite the likely prospect of fewer passengers than projected in the next year or two, airport managers say they don't anticipate problems shouldering the roughly $40 million a year in debt burden over the next 30 years for the new facility.


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Ousted mayor guides local up-and-comers: Peterson named moderator for prestigious groupRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin
Voters decided last Election Day that they'd had enough of Bart Peterson, but the former mayor is in demand with academics, a think tank, and now the city's premier leadership network. Peterson is moderator of the Stanley K. Lacy Executive Leadership Series, which introduces "emerging leaders" to Indianapolis and its problems. "It's something I never went through as a class member. I've always envied those who did," Peterson said of the series, which accepts just 25 applicants each year. "It's...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: We shouldn't let market mayhem obscure progressRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Mike Hicks
Amid all this joyless market watching, this much is clear: The financial markets and the economy are going to get worse before they get better. But market watching is never a healthy sport, especially since it tends to make us lose track of the real economy at times like these. Over the past couple of weeks, the real economy has shown a bit of resilience. And here in Indiana, really great news has been lost in the wake of the...
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Commentary: Turmoil raises questions about toll roadRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Brian Williams
On Aug. 28, the investment bank UBS downgraded its rating on the Australian investment bank, Macquarie Group. UBS noted that Macquarie faced the threat of a declining asset base, which it leverages to fund Macquarie's dividend payments. UBS also posited that Macquarie may be inadequately capitalized. Macquarie Group should be familiar to Hoosiers as one of the two entities that leased the Indiana Toll Road in April 2006 for 75 years. To lease the toll road, Macquarie invested $385 million...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Crisis pits fairness against urgencyRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Morton Marcus
As these words are written, we do not know what Congress will decide to do about the mortgage mess. But it is clear folks are angry about the inequity of rescuing borrowers, lenders or traders with funding from the pockets of the innocent. Among the "villains" are home buyers who took on mortgages they could not afford. Also marked for sanctions are over-eager lenders, highly paid executives, and those who dealt in "innovative" financial products linked to mortgages. Those who...
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THE TRAVELING LIFE: Walking-and dancing and dreaming-in Memphis

September 29, 2008
Frank Basile
In past columns, I have written about travel to far away places, but there are plenty of discoveries to be made and interesting sights to be seen in cities closer to home. Our recent four-day trip to Memphis is a case in point. We made the obligatory stop at Graceland, where the tagline on all their brochures and ads says, "Where Elvis lives." Interesting, but we were more intrigued by Sun Studios, where the story really began. That's where the...
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Will little transit systems make bigger footprint?: Study to look at economies, new opportunities to grow and coordinate rural bus systemsRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Chris O\'malley
They're overshadowed in all the talk of a commuter rail line and its cosmopolitan allure. And they don't get headlines like Indy-Go does when it launches another route to whisk Carmel and Fishers suburbanites to work downtown. But rural transit providers in the nine doughnut counties quietly generate economic growth by hauling hundreds of thousands of people each year in small buses or vans to doctors' offices, shopping centers and jobs. Suburban businesses have been grousing for years that the...
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Planners to pare down commuter-rail options: Vote for light diesel trains would precede designRestricted Content

September 22, 2008
Chris O\'malley
Goodbye elevated guideway. Goodbye buses zooming down paved-over rail beds. For that matter, forget about commuter trains running down the median of Binford Boulevard and I-69. Or along Allisonville Road or Keystone Avenue. These northeast corridor rapid-transit options, cheered and jeered by residents in the debate over rapid transit, officially get thrown from the train on Sept. 26. That's if a regional government group votes to accept the recommendation of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization for running diesel light rail...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: State buildings to go green thanks to executive orderRestricted Content

September 15, 2008
Jason Shelley
Green construction projects in Indiana are becoming more the norm than the exception. More office buildings, schools and universities and even residences are being designed and constructed to improve environmental efficiency. And now, new and renovated state buildings will be a whole lot greener, too. Gov. Mitch Daniels signed an executive order this summer establishing the Energy Efficient State Building Initiative, mandating that all new state buildings be designed, constructed and operated for maximum energy efficiency. This is significant for...
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Green building movement picking up steam in Indiana: More than 100 LEED projects in pipeline statewideRestricted Content

September 15, 2008
Scott Olson
The portfolios of local architectural firms are beginning to boast more ecofriendly projects. But it hasn't been that way for long. The trend to seek Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification is a recent phenomenon that appeals not only to the tree-hugging crowd but corporations and government entities, too. "We're definitely getting to the point where clients are asking us about the LEED process," said Eric Anderson, a project architect at Axis Architecture + Interiors. "Whereas before, even [as...
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Experts: Building boom not over: Big projects wind down, but new ones fill pipelineRestricted Content

September 8, 2008
Scott Olson
The completion of $2 billion in city construction projects has left a gaping hole in contractor job schedules-as wide as when the roof opens at Lucas Oil Stadium. Even so, industry leaders remain optimistic about staying busy despite the combination of a tepid economy and the end of a local boom that stretched the limits of the labor pool. The $1.1 billion airport midfield terminal project, the $715 million stadium and $150 million Central Library expansion helped to create so...
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Laptop hell: Air travel can bounce, bungle dataRestricted Content

September 1, 2008
Tim Altom
Travel may broaden the mind, but it's hell on laptops. If your laptop suffers some kind of death-dealing blow, it'll probably be on the road. Air travel is the worst. You're required during security screening to pull your laptop out of its snug little protective cover and submit it to the tender mercies of the Transportation Security Administration's conveyors, X-ray machines and employees. Then there's the jostling scramble to put it back in on the far side of the screening...
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VIEWPOINT: Advancing manufacturing is key to futureRestricted Content

September 1, 2008
Joseph Hornett
We've all heard it: Our economy is creeping to a crawl. Skyhigh oil prices, a weak housing market and the struggling U.S. dollar are discouraging consumers and business owners alike. Fears about our nation's fiscal health are shaking broader confidence in the banking industry, the system of global trade, and even our public image abroad. In the face of such adversity, it's helpful to remember that Americans have faced daunting challenges in the past. In tougher times, such as the...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: China, higher education and our economic futureRestricted Content

September 1, 2008
Mark Miles
In mid-September, I'll be traveling to China's Liaoning province as part of a delegation led by Indiana State University, hosted by Liaoning University. We'll arrive in the country too late for the Olympics, but we'll be there to talk about another form of global competition-economic development. It's appropriate that the two universities are co-hosting a conference on economic development issues, given the importance of human capital in our economy. It's especially appropriate for China, where higher education has become a...
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  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

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