Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: China, higher education and our economic futureRestricted Content

September 1, 2008
Mark Miles
In mid-September, I'll be traveling to China's Liaoning province as part of a delegation led by Indiana State University, hosted by Liaoning University. We'll arrive in the country too late for the Olympics, but we'll be there to talk about another form of global competition-economic development. It's appropriate that the two universities are co-hosting a conference on economic development issues, given the importance of human capital in our economy. It's especially appropriate for China, where higher education has become a...
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Airlines say airport's deal with FedEx over expansion is likely to raise landing fees

September 1, 2008
Chris O'Malley

Five airlines at Indianapolis International Airport--all of them paying higher fees and rents to help pay for the $1.1 billion midfield terminal--complain they may be stuck footing the bill for part of the $214 million FedEx cargo-hub expansion.


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VIEWPOINT: How to win Uncle Sam's gas-tax shell gameRestricted Content

August 25, 2008
Ronald Fraser
Between 1956 and 1991, Indiana motorists willingly paid "temporary" hikes in the federal gasoline tax, knowing the money was being used to build the 42,000-mile interstate highway system. In 1991, Congress declared the highway system completed-but the tax lived on and on, growing bigger and bigger. No longer needed to build the interstate, the current 18.4-cents-per-gallon federal gas tax-double what it was in 1990-now funds a "highway trust fund" shell game that shifts $866 million a year, and control over...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Why the resurgence of railroads will help drive stateRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Mike Hicks
I have two friends who are train fanatics of the worst kind. These guys aren't just dazzled by the sight of a large train; they furtively seek them out. One friend has made it his life's ambition to ride every rail line in Great Britain. The other scours eBay for rail schedules from the 19th century. Both of these wonderful men have exceptionally tolerant wives. I am a bit concerned my 4-year-old is turning into one of these creatures. He...
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Saddling up for a night of work under the stars: Carriage driver encounters romance, drunkennessRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Erik Stegemiller
When she reported to work at 5 p.m. on a recent evening, Taylor consulted a chart and saw she was assigned to Cheyenne, a 16-year-old mare, and carriage number 29. She backed the spotted horse out of the stall, hitched up the carriage-making sure all straps were tightly fastened-and left the Yellow Rose stables at 13th Street and Capitol Avenue. During the half-hour ride to Monument Circle, she explained the personal challenge that carriage driving posed. It wasn't how to...
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Huguenard a billion-dollar broker: Senior vice president at Colliers one of the nation's top deal-makersRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Cory Schouten
John E. Huguenard is on a roll. He's got $1 billion in active industrial listings and is on track to top his $700 million deal volume from last year. The low-key super-broker for the local office of commercial real estate powerhouse Colliers Turley Martin Tucker has closed 17 deals worth a total of $250 million already this year. And that's no fluke: Huguenard, 45, has sold or leased more than 100 million square feet of industrial property in more than...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Why the resurgence of railroads will help drive stateRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Mike Hicks
I have two friends who are train fanatics of the worst kind. These guys aren't just dazzled by the sight of a large train; they furtively seek them out. One friend has made it his life's ambition to ride every rail line in Great Britain. The other scours eBay for rail schedules from the 19th century. Both of these wonderful men have exceptionally tolerant wives. I am a bit concerned my 4-year-old is turning into one of these creatures. He...
More

Saddling up for a night of work under the stars: Carriage driver encounters romance, drunkennessRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Erik Stegemiller
When she reported to work at 5 p.m. on a recent evening, Taylor consulted a chart and saw she was assigned to Cheyenne, a 16-year-old mare, and carriage number 29. She backed the spotted horse out of the stall, hitched up the carriage-making sure all straps were tightly fastened-and left the Yellow Rose stables at 13th Street and Capitol Avenue. During the half-hour ride to Monument Circle, she explained the personal challenge that carriage driving posed. It wasn't how to...
More

Huguenard a billion-dollar broker: Senior vice president at Colliers one of the nation's top deal-makersRestricted Content

August 18, 2008
Cory Schouten
John E. Huguenard is on a roll. He's got $1 billion in active industrial listings and is on track to top his $700 million deal volume from last year. The low-key super-broker for the local office of commercial real estate powerhouse Colliers Turley Martin Tucker has closed 17 deals worth a total of $250 million already this year. And that's no fluke: Huguenard, 45, has sold or leased more than 100 million square feet of industrial property in more than...
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Study costs, public support mount for commuter rail: Key vote on northeast corridor could come next monthRestricted Content

August 11, 2008
Chris O\'malley
Worsening gas prices and congestion have some commuters demanding faster progress on launching a rapid transit line. They can quibble about slowness in getting it done, but lack of study hasn't been an issue. The Indianapolis Metropolitan Development Organization spent $4 million since 2002 on a rapid transit study that concluded earlier this year, according to records provided by the agency. Most, or 80 percent, of the funds paid to eight consulting firms came from federal transportation funds, with 20...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Why Indiana's AAA bond rating should please all of usRestricted Content

August 11, 2008
Mike Hicks
Sometimes, obscure economic issues matter a great deal to our economic well-being. One example is the news that Indiana's bond rankings have risen to the highest level, the highly coveted AAA ranking from Standard and Poor's. Why that happened, what it means and why it is important should matter to Hoosiers. To begin with, all states, like virtually all households, borrow money to ease cash flow issues. States also borrow money to make infrastructure investments. The government essentially takes out...
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Commentary: Let's invest in criminal justiceRestricted Content

August 11, 2008
Brian Williams
Indianapolis has spent more than $2 billion on worthy civic projects such as the new airport terminal, Lucas Oil Stadium, and a new Central Library. The same sense of civic pride must be mobilized for funding improved criminal justice. Strong, coherent mayoral leadership is required to address the causes of increased criminal activity here, but a lasting solution requires a community-wide effort. Criminal activity is not simply the result of an individual's motivation to offend. For crime to occur, the...
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Repairs slated for crumbling 39th Street bridge: Federal funding could draw criticism from watchdogsRestricted Content

August 11, 2008
Chris O\'malley
Each year, the 30,000 people who ride the Fishers fair train disembark at a depot east of Fall Creek and shuffle 228 feet across the historic 39th Street bridge, which leads to Gate 6 of the Indiana State Fairgrounds. Few likely give much thought to the crumbling condition of the bridge, other than noticing that a large block of stone railing has broken off at the west end. But, below, stones also have fallen off the sides of an arch...
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Pearson Partners recovers from HHGregg loss: Agency gains new clients, projects 20-percent growthRestricted Content

July 28, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
Ron Pearson said business at his Indianapolis-based advertising agency over the last year has been "stellar." Exaggeration or not, any growth at Pearson Partners is a 180-degree reversal from the dire situation the firm faced just a year ago. In April 2007, Pearson's firm-then called Pearson McMahon Fletcher England-lost its biggest client, HHGregg. Last summer, Pearson cut nearly half its work force, paring the agency down to about 20 employees in the wake of losing the $20-million-plus account. Pearson's capitalized...
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Airport parking strategy might cut garage rates while still boosting revenueRestricted Content

July 28, 2008
Chris O'Malley

Busy touting restaurants, artwork and other luxuries of the $1.1 billion midfield terminal, the Indianapolis Airport Authority is still grappling with a few details arguably more important to passengers. Among them: How much will it cost to park? The answer might be among the more surprising aspects of midfield. Officials are considering slashing rates for the 5,900-space successor to Indianapolis International's existing 1,776-space garage.

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I-465 widening may require buyout of several buildingsRestricted Content

July 28, 2008
Chris O'Malley

Several landmark commercial properties fronting Interstate 465 on the northeast side could be in the path of bulldozers when the state begins adding lanes as early as 2012. Memos prepared by a consulting firm to the Indiana Department of Transportation go as far as estimating acquisition prices for buildings, including that of country station WFMS-FM 95.5 and other Cumulus Media stations at 6810 N. Shadeland Ave.


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Recession squeezes local logistics industryRestricted Content

July 21, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
State economic development leaders remain bullish on Indiana's future as a logistics hub even as two local players have been forced into bankruptcy and others struggle with high fuel prices.
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FUNNY BUSINESS: You'll know really bad drivers when you see them

July 21, 2008
Mike Redmond
A reader recently forwarded an e-mail ranking the worst American drivers by city, along with the suggestion "Make fun of this." While I usually don't respond to such directives, this case was different, seeing as how it came from my mother. You know how it is. Anyway, here we go-a column about the worst drivers in America, as ranked by a well-known insurance company and recommended by Mom. The Top 10 "Where-Did-These-People-Get-Their-Licenses?" cities are: Columbia, S.C.; St. Louis, Mo.; Greensboro,...
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More manufacturing? Maybe Butler did it: University's accelerator helps plants boost businessRestricted Content

June 16, 2008
Scott Olson
Ten years ago, Bob McAfee bought SaniServ, an 80-year-old Mooresville institution that pioneered the making of softserve ice cream machines for restaurants. Despite the manufacturer's longevity, a handful of competitors-one of them much larger and two roughly the same size-had cut into market share, causing SaniServ's annual revenue to stall at about $10 million. Determined to improve upon the figure, but unsure how to go about it, McAfee turned to the Butler Business Accelerator. The 2-year-old consultancy on the Butler...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Logistics still driving central Indiana industrial marketRestricted Content

June 16, 2008
J. Jeffrey
For the past 10-plus years, central Indiana has benefitted from growth in the distribution/logistics industry with hundreds of new jobs and millions of square feet of new facilities. We've seen massive facilities go up one right after another, often topping the square footage of our tallest downtown skyscrapers. In the past eight years alone, the square footage of central Indiana distribution centers has more than doubled from 20 million square feet to 51 million square feet. And we're not just...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: There are Six Sigma options; Here's a look at six of themRestricted Content

June 16, 2008
Dave Berry
While many manufacturing companies are implementing Six Sigma for continuous process improvement, it may not be the most practical solution for every company. Smaller manufacturers can benefit from applying many of the tools found in the Six Sigma methodology, but on a more manageable scale for daily process improvement. While far from a complete list, the following six practical tools may be used by smaller companies who are motivated to continually streamline production and improve productivity: Key performance indicators Most...
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Flagship rises over post-GM town: Incubator has helped preserve automotive talent base, foster diverse businessesRestricted Content

June 16, 2008
Chris O\'malley
ANDERSON - Along Interstate 69, in a new industrial building with side-windows covered in paper to foil prying eyes, Altair Nanotechnologies is perfecting a ceramic oxide battery with three times the power of a conventional lithium battery. Up the road, Comfort Motion Technologies has written software to make a car's power seat jiggle ever so subtly, to keep one's back, butt and thighs comfortable on long drives. And everybody is keeping an eye on Pete Bitar, whose green laser device...
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Purdue joins Conexus on manufacturing, logistics effort: University, advocacy group predict evolving industryRestricted Content

June 16, 2008
Scott Olson
An advocacy group formed a year ago to boost the visibility and growth of the state's advanced manufacturing and logistics industries has received a major lift from Purdue University. Conexus Indiana and Purdue earlier this month announced the formation of a partnership in which the university will lend its academic and research talents to the organization. The key goals include linking manufacturers with new suppliers, exploring emerging markets and supporting startups launched from university or privatesector research. "Conexus is very...
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Bankrupt ATA may sue ex-partner FedExRestricted Content

June 9, 2008
Greg Andrews
ATA Airlines Inc. largely blames FedEx Corp. for knocking it out of business this spring. Now, the bankrupt airline is preparing to fight back by suing the Memphis cargo giant, charging it wrongfully canceled a military-charter contract that generated hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue for ATA.
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IPIC's BioWorksU virtual effort wins acclaim:Restricted Content

June 9, 2008
Scott Olson
A new Web site developed locally and designed to attract youngsters to careers in the life sciences sector now shares something in common with the wildly popular Club Penguin site. The Indianapolis Private Industry Council, with assistance from locally based Creative Street Media Group, created BioWorksU.com. And while more educational and likely more appealing to a larger age group than Club Penguin, the two were among recent Webby Awards finalists. Called the "Oscars of the Internet" by The New York...
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  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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