Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Public offerings rise in '07: Three Indiana companies hit turbulence after IPOsRestricted Content

January 28, 2008
Scott Olson
The market for initial public offerings in Indiana was on the upswing last year, as the number of companies to go public tripled, from one in 2006 to three in 2007. Locally based HHGregg Inc., Kokomobased Haynes International Inc. and LaPorte-based LaPorte Bancorp. Inc. became publicly traded. The fact that three more companies in Indiana became public doesn't represent a trend. But four others that have filed IPO registration statements with the Securities and Exchange Commission bolster the belief that...
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City emerging as drug distribution hub: Medco Health Solutions deal latest boon to growing subsector in Indiana's life sciences development effortsRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Thanks to a series of major economic development wins, Indianapolis is enjoying a pharmaceutical distribution business hot streak. Life sciences industry leaders hope to keep the sizzle burning in 2008 and beyond. "It's not something we're hoping we can do someday. It's something we're already doing now," said BioCrossroads CEO David Johnson. "We're simply trying to expand the footprint of what we're doing." Pharmaceutical logistics has become a big business. According to the Arlington, Va.-based Healthcare Distribution Management Association, U.S....
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Lawmakers call for advocate to support airline passenger 'rights'Restricted Content

January 21, 2008
Chris O'Malley
Northwest Airlines flight 1829--stranded on a Detroit taxiway for seven hours with lavatories overflowing and the 198 souls aboard without food or water--has now landed at the Indiana General Assembly. Two Republican lawmakers have proposed creating an "airline consumer advocate" to resolve disputes on behalf of passengers who've endured poor service.
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Westfield hopes to draw business farther north: New development could reduce residential tax ratesRestricted Content

January 21, 2008
Michael Dabney
Back when they arrived in 1996, there were lots of open spaces and taxes were low, Jones said. "Overall, it was a good place to live," he said. Jones said he still loves living in Westfield, which is 20 miles north of Indianapolis. But he admits things are changing, which is a double-edged sword. Eight years ago, according to the U.S. census, Westfield had just 9,300 people. Now, it's a rapidly growing city with a population of 24,000, an increase...
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Community education keeping up with business: Lawrence Township, other districts making classes more convenientRestricted Content

January 14, 2008
Scott Olson
Thirteen years ago, long before the current commotion over escalating property taxes in Marion County, a local public school superintendent became embroiled in a similar uproar. Residents of Lawrence Township in 1994 challenged former district leader Bernard McKenzie to rein in what they perceived as excessive spending of taxpayer funds. He responded by creating the Lawrence Township Community Education Program as a testament to the citizens and their support. Today, it has grown to serve about 6,000 people annually and...
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250 retailers express interest in midfield terminal spaceRestricted Content

December 31, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Retailers and restaurateurs have flooded Indianapolis International Airport with letters-of-interest for space in the midfield terminal, which is scheduled to open in late 2008. The demand is "more than five times" the number of concession spaces available, airport managers say.
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VIEWPOINT: Why Anderson lured me from FloridaRestricted Content

December 31, 2007
Tim Kern
Baby boomers have five more years, 10, 15-then it's time to enjoy retirement. Except that we keep buying everm o r e - ex p e n s ive houses. What will happen when the paychecks stop? Facing this, I reassessed my situation in Florida. In two years, my taxes there tripled; insurance, doubled. An affordable mortgage didn't offset increases from the state and my friendly insurance company. To stay viable, I had to leave. Where to go? I figured...
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Celadon tries to reverse declineRestricted Content

December 24, 2007
Chris O'Malley
In just over one quarter, shares of Celadon Group lost nearly half their value as profitable cargo got harder to find in a slowing economy. The stock closed at $9.13 on Dec. 19, down from nearly $17 in late August.
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: The worst of this year's technology snafusRestricted Content

December 24, 2007
Tim Altom
Another year gone, and yet another Christmas gift for you. Every year, I collect examples of utterly horrendous technological snafus and write about them. No matter how awful your own meltdowns may have been, they can't have been as bad as these, so enter the new year with a light heart. The first example of disaster is fresh in the news still, at least in reports from the British Broadcasting Corp. The English government has lost disks with personal information...
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Logistics advocacy group Conexus gears up for statewide pitchRestricted Content

December 17, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Carol D'Amico, president and CEO of the newly formed industry advocacy group Conexus Indiana, is intent on boosting the visibility and growth of the logistics industry. Large though it is, it's also relatively ambiguous and sits in the shadow of the state's much-vaunted life sciences industry.
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: How globalization benefits Hoosier companiesRestricted Content

December 10, 2007
Mike Hicks
The debate on globalization most often focuses on imported goods. This is natural, for it is the sole source of pain associated with increasing international trade. The pain accrues to workers and investors in businesses that cannot compete internationally. Of course, the net impact is positive, in part because trade reallocates workers and capital to more productive activities. These more productive activities pay better and so are ultimately better for the economy-both here and abroad. One often-overlooked element of the...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Are unions really that important?Restricted Content

December 10, 2007
Morton Marcus
Uncle Uriah Marcus visited us on Thanksgiving. It took over a week to recover. He blames "the @#%$# unions" for most of our state's woes. Uncle Uriah asserts "them big unions scares businesses away from Indiannie." A sample of his views: High property taxes: It's the teachers' union's fault because teachers keep pushing up their earnings and reducing their responsibility. Congestion in cities: Bus workers' unions keep fares too high for anyone to ride the bus. The battle between the...
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High-speed rail still on slow track in state: Economic study, innovative financing exploredRestricted Content

November 26, 2007
Chris O\'malley
The effort to put high-speed trains into service in Indiana and eight other Midwestern states sometimes seems as fanciful as the first manned flight to Mars. There have been years of talk and countless meetings. And it will be many more years before a vehicle is fueled-and-ready, if ever. In the 13 years since the Indiana High Speed Rail Association was formed in Highland, the closest thing to high-speed rail Hoosiers have seen is an occasional speedy European locomotive brought...
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Feds eliminate quirky price-fixing rule for interstate moversRestricted Content

November 26, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Interstate moving companies have operated for decades under industrywide price fixing blessed by the federal government. But the system--one Tony Soprano and the boys in the back room of Bada Bing would love--will end Dec. 31, ushering in price cuts and other changes that could affect the cost of a move.
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VIEWPOINT: The high cost of traffic Band-AidsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Adam Thies
According to the article titled "Traffic Transformation?" in the Oct. 15 IBJ, the Indiana Department of Transportation is working on a roughly $600 million plan to relieve traffic congestion in the area of interstates 465 and 69. Hold on a second! What is really broken here? I contend little to nothing. Yes, roadways need maintenance and upkeep, but these roadways operate just fine. Because this area is congested at the morning and evening rush hour, the perception exists that these...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Existing work force is our biggest education challengeRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Carol D\'amico
As Hoosiers, every time we open our wallets and pocketbooks, we should think about going back to school. For the last three decades, Indiana's per capita income growth has lagged the rest of the country, to the point where the average Hoosier earns less nized for work force development use a combination of state and local dollars and even lottery funds (as in Georgia). Private management of the Hoosier Lottery, as proposed during the last legislative session, could provide the...
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ATA parent shifts HQ to GeorgiaRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
Chris O'Malley
The writing has been on the wall that Indianapolis might lose the headquarters for ATA Airlines and/or parent Global Aero Logistics ever since April, when Global said it was buying Georgia-based World Air Holdings. Now, the writing is on paper: Indianapolis has lost another headquarters.
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: There's really nothing light about the topic of light railRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
Don Altemeyer
Twenty U.S. cities have some form of light rail systems in operation, and about 40 more are constructing or seriously considering light rail systems. While the list of cities with active systems isn't really all that surprising (you can see it online at w w w. a p t a . c o m ) , are other cities so busy building or extending them? Imagine a trolley system with regular stops within a city, but it has the ability...
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Local corporations maintain FFA convention funding: Main goal: getting attention of future leadersRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Indianapolis-area companies are ponying up $1.15 million to help put on this month's National FFA convention, an event expected to draw more than 55,000 members and their chaperones to the city. They're backing the bigbudget affair largely because of the access it gives them to future leaders-from tomorrow's policymakers to those who could someday work at these local firms. And the city is putting on quite a show to get the attention of the roughly 46,000 12-to 21-year-old members and...
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Half-billion-dollar traffic plan considered for northeast sideRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Whether it's southbound I-69 traffic backed up almost to Noblesville, or northbound I-465 traffic a parking lot all the way to 56th Street, the northeast highway system is grossly inadequate at peak hours. But a report issued last month by an INDOT consultant shows a radical, $600 million reconfiguration is in the works.
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RETURN ON TECHNOLOGY: Try your hand at running McDonald'sRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Tim Altom
It's always fun when I find something on the Web that's highly critical, vaguely disgusting, entertaining and informative, all at once. Mollieindustria has created an online video game at w w w. m c v i d e o game.comthat lets you run the burger giant McDonald's, and while it's not sparing of the company's faults, it's a great study in how hard it is to keep the sandwich empire going. The creators say on the site that they built...
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Experts look into the future of health care: Industry panelists disagree on whether current system needs radical changesRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Five local industry leaders conducted a serious debate over problems and issues facing our health care system during the most recent installment in Indianapolis Business Journal's Power Breakfast series. The event took place at the Downtown Marriott hotel on Sept. 21 The panelists: Robert Brody, president and CEO of St. Francis Hospital & Health Centers, the Indianapolis-area's fourth-largest hospital system. Brody has been chief executive at St. Francis since 1996. Dr. Robert Mouser, a primary care physician at Cornerstone Family...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Long road ahead for financing transportationRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Mike Hicks
The recent Indiana Logistics Summit framed a number of issues that matter to Hoosiers young and old. I've done a fair amount of transportation and economic development research, but this conference held in Indianapolis was a chance for me to listen and learn. Here's my take on some of the issues: Nationally, a significant piece of the public transportation infrastructure (roads and bridges, for example) has already outlived its anticipated life span. Solid engineering and construction coupled with continual maintenance...
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Commentary: Here's the skinny on why we're fatRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Tom Harton
A week rarely passes without news of our obesity epidemic. Fattest-state rankings and the like are a staple of our news diet. These stories are often served with dire health warnings, which politicians invoke when they encourage us to eat less and exercise more. But does anyone really stop to think about why obesity has become our national obsession? Our infamous rotundness isn't only a byproduct of poor eating habits and a reluctance to hit the gym. Chalk some of...
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Post-bankruptcy turnaround not taking off for ATARestricted Content

September 10, 2007
Chris O'Malley
More than 18 months after flying out of a bankruptcy reorganization that unloaded $1 billion of debt and costly aircraft leases, the parent of ATA Airlines still finds landing a profit elusive. Indianapolis-based Global Aero Logistics posted a loss of $46.1 million in the first half of 2007, according to documents it filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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