Vacancy rates

Rolls-Royce gives downtown office market a bounce

March 22, 2011
Tom Harton
The decision by Rolls-Royce Corp. to occupy Eli Lilly and Co.’s Faris office campus downtown headed off what could have been a big spike in the central business district Class A office vacancy rate.
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Duke Realty sells offices in shift toward industrialRestricted Content

February 19, 2011
Scott Olson
Strategy also calls for greater Southeast presence, less investment in the Midwest.
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Not much optimism in commercial real estate outlook

January 13, 2011
Cory Schouten
Another challenging year is in store for commercial real estate thanks to high unemployment, a still-struggling housing market and an unforgiving credit environment, Cassidy Turley plans to report Thursday at its annual State of Real Estate event.
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Report: Local apartment market strong in 2010

January 6, 2011
Scott Olson
Occupancy in the Indianapolis metro area grew last year to 90.8 percent, according to the latest annual market report compiled by apartment brokerage Tikijian Associates. The downtown market, in particular, boasted strong numbers.
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Local office market continues vacancy struggles

January 4, 2011
 IBJ Staff
The Indianapolis office market suffered through a tough 2010, marked by stagnant and high downtown vacancy rates, falling suburban occupancy rates and another year without construction activity.
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Commercial real estate will continue its climb back in 2011

January 4, 2011
Tom Harton
Medical office likely will be the strongest sector, followed by apartments.
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Geist apartment complex sale ends drought of Class A transactions

November 23, 2010
Tom Harton
Grande Reserve at Geist fetched $13.3 million, just shy of the asking price.
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Industrial market shows strength but faces challenges

August 24, 2010
Tom Harton
About 2.5 million square feet of industrial space is expected to hit the market between now and the end of the year, most of it in the Plainfield area.
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Lilly vacating 99,000 square feet in 30 S. Meridian buildingRestricted Content

March 5, 2007
Cory Schouten
Eli Lilly and Co. has decided to vacate 99,000 square feet of office space at 30 S. Meridian St. in yet another blow to the struggling downtown market. Roughly 1.8 million square feet of space already is sitting idle downtown, putting downward pressure on rents.
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  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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