Viewpoint

BROWNING: How to fix Broad Ripple

July 19, 2014
Jamie Browning / Special to IBJ
It is a tragedy that the senseless shootings in Broad Ripple earlier this month might define one of the most important destination districts in Indianapolis.
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BRINEGAR: Indiana is still progressing too slowlyRestricted Content

July 12, 2014
Progress is a word with very positive connotations. The mantra seems to be: If we’re making progress, we can avoid criticism for not taking action.
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Stats don't tell full story

July 12, 2014
Kudos to Richard Gunderman and Mark Mutz for their [June 23 Viewpoint]. Their points are spot on. I’ve seen the power of inspirational leadership and the subsequent production that can be achieved. By contrast, I’ve seen the negative effect number worship has on the morale and integrity of a team.
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MOSELEY: A new way to finance collegeRestricted Content

July 5, 2014
We need a fundamentally new approach to financing college education. Price resistance and over-reliance on student loans are not going away.
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PHILLIPS: Indiana is lab of life sciences innovationRestricted Content

June 28, 2014
Indiana is in the midst of a revolution and it’s not what you think. It’s not politics, open-wheel racing or even basketball. This revolution is about creating a sustainable health care model for personal wellness and economic growth.
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GUNDERMAN; MUTZ: We’re now worshipping numbersRestricted Content

June 21, 2014
“You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” It is difficult to think of an adage more universally endorsed in business, government, not-for-profits and throughout our culture. Every enterprise wants to demonstrate its success through measurable outcomes—whether reduced wait times in the Veterans Administration health system, increased student test scores in the Atlanta public school system, or profits in a business.
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BRENNER: Making Brookside neighborhood the next big thingRestricted Content

June 7, 2014
Bryan Brenner / Special to IBJ
A couple of weeks ago, as my 14-year-old daughter, Caroline, prepared for her final days as an Oaks Academy student, she wrote, “The Oaks Academy has taught me to work hard, not because you have to but because you want to.”
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MUTZ: Growth is answer to GOP agendaRestricted Content

May 31, 2014
John Mutz / Special to IBJ
It’s time for Republicans to stop playing defense on President Obama’s agenda and implement our own pro-growth agenda that solves the country’s biggest problems—the economy and jobs—then reap the political rewards.
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HETRICK: The risk of living and learning in silos

May 24, 2014
Confession: 25 years ago, during my lunch breaks, I began listening to a newly syndicated radio talk show. The host, Rush Limbaugh, was anathema to everything I believe. But while his opinions were outrageous, his delivery was delectable.
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GROSS: Toward a more welcoming IndianaRestricted Content

May 17, 2014
Annette Gross / Special to IBJ
As co-president of Indianapolis Parents, Families, Friends & Allies of Lesbians and Gays, I hear stories of heartbreak as mom after mom tell me about their children leaving because they do not feel welcome in Indiana. We as moms want to be together as a family during important times. However, because our children are moving out at such a feverish pace we miss out on so much.
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KEY: End the end-runs around public businessRestricted Content

May 10, 2014
Steve Key / Special to IBJ
Technology that makes a vast amount of public records available with a few keystrokes can also make monitoring government actions more difficult for Hoosiers.
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LEE: A path toward better health care

May 3, 2014
David Lee
Lost in all the rhetoric about the Affordable Care Act—website glitches, recriminations and cries for “repeal and replace”—it’s easy to forget the near-universal agreement that today’s health care environment is fragmented and inefficient.
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FRIEDMAN: Tax cuts undermine prosperityRestricted Content

April 26, 2014
Shaw Friedman / Special to IBJ
State Sen. Brandt Hershman, key sponsor of the reduction in state corporate and bank taxes, is still insisting that more business tax cuts are the way to prosperity.
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HENDERSON: Why we should halt tax abatementsRestricted Content

April 19, 2014
Tom Henderson
It’s time to rein in the tax abaters. If the business plan succeeds only if you can avoid or abate taxes, then it’s a bad plan.
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LANNAN: Cash could swing sprawling Fishers mayor's raceRestricted Content

April 12, 2014
Larry Lannan / Special to IBJ
A large amount of money is pouring into the Republican primary election for the mayor of Fishers. Don’t be swayed by the amount of money a campaign has raised.
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FULGHAM: Beyond the public school culture warsRestricted Content

April 5, 2014
Nicole Baker Fulgham / Special to IBJ
It’s time to begin engaging public schools in ways that help ensure all children reach their God-given potential.
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LEARNER: Vehicle-miles tax would roll HoosiersRestricted Content

March 29, 2014
Howard Learner / Special to IBJ
Indianapolis is striving to become an electric-vehicles center. Gas tax revenue is declining, though, as people drive less and as more fuel-efficient new cars require filling up less at the pump. That saves people money, reduces pollution and lessens America’s imports of foreign oil.
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MURTLOW: Business rallied for kids at StatehouseRestricted Content

March 22, 2014
Ann Murtlow
Education. Work-force development. Quality child care. The war on poverty. Crime. Economics. These are all familiar words and phrases used readily by policymakers, business leaders and child advocates. But rarely have the concepts been more tightly intertwined into good state policy than they were during this session of the General Assembly.
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GUY: Don’t run education like a businessRestricted Content

March 15, 2014
John Guy / Special to IBJ
Disagreements about education reform result from conflicting models: the business model and the social model. Governors such as Daniels and Pence, reflecting their backgrounds and support structures, tend toward the business model. Superintendent Ritz, with almost 35 years as a teacher/communications coordinator in elementary schools, is more aligned with the social model.
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LEONARD: Rooting for a Pence-Sebelius agreementRestricted Content

March 8, 2014
Douglas Leonard / Special to IBJ
A medical epidemic is one of the worst scenarios a hospital can face—when a significant portion of the population is suddenly struck with a life-threatening illness.
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KOEHLER: Put mass transit to real-world testRestricted Content

March 1, 2014
Kurt Koehler / Special to IBJ
An entrepreneur, risking personal wealth, would approach the problem from a different angle.
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RYERSON: Justice center belongs downtownRestricted Content

February 22, 2014
Dennis Ryerson / Special to IBJ
I wasn’t prepared for what greeted me when I walked into Denver’s Lindsey-Flanigan Courthouse a couple of weeks ago for jury duty.
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ZOELLER: The rule of law is underappreciatedRestricted Content

February 15, 2014
Greg Zoeller / Special to IBJ
The Pirate Code made famous in the series of “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies established rules to avoid the heightened opportunity for chaos among 18th century pirates. In some respects, all laws are established by societies to bring certainty in an uncertain world.
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MADDOX: Wolves are still at Gramma's doorRestricted Content

February 8, 2014
Mark Maddox
In the movie “The Wolf of Wall Street,” Jordan Belfort, disgraced broker and owner of the now-defunct brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont, is portrayed by Oscar-nominated actor Leonardo DiCaprio as over-the-top good looking, witty and motivational. Belfort, if we are to believe what we see in the film, is a phenomenal salesman—a self-made man committed to making lots of money for himself and his friends.
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SULLIVAN: Rural areas stick it to Indy againRestricted Content

February 1, 2014
Richard Sullivan / Special to IBJ
Many years ago, a legislator told me it was “country bankers” who killed Indiana banking. They and their lawmakers carried the day in the 1970s and 1980s with regulations against buying banks across county lines. The big Indianapolis banks were thus held in check.
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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

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  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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