Life Science & Biotech

Indiana's universities give industry a boost: State touts wealth of higher-ed insurance programsRestricted Content

March 6, 2006
Scott Olson
Politicians seem so much more 21st century when they talk about attracting life sciences and information technology jobs to Indiana. But they're not about to ignore the state's second-largest employer-the often-overlooked insurance industry. Indiana insurers employ more than 60,000 Hoosiers, second only to farming, and pay an average annual salary of $47,500, nearly $10,000 more than the state average, according to a 2004 study by Purdue University. Moreover, the industry boasts some of the state's largest public and private companies-WellPoint...
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Startup receives first Indiana Seed Fund investment: Purdue-bred SonarMed plans move to IndianapolisRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
Until recently, SonarMed Inc., a startup developing a new type of breathing tube, was just a mailbox at Purdue University. But having recently been awarded the first investment from the BioCrossroads' Indiana Seed Fund, SonarMed plans to move into office space in Indianapolis, hire 15 to 20 employees before the end of the year and begin seeking U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for its device. The Indiana Seed Fund was formed last summer and now has $6 million to...
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Emerging India: Opportunity or threat?: Indiana businesses brace for growing global competitionRestricted Content

February 27, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Opportunity or threat? Indiana businesses brace for growing global competition Next month, President Bush will make his first official visit to India. To most of the American media, it'll be just one more round of global terrorism discussions with a distant foreign nation, perhaps worthy of a brief. The Indian press knows better. Six weeks ahead of Bush's trip, banner headlines about it ran in every newspaper. Al Hubbard knows better, too. Friends with Bush since their days at Harvard...
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Emerging India: Passage to Bangalore: Hoosiers seek outsourcing and investment opportunitiesRestricted Content

February 20, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Passage to Bangalore Hoosiers seek outsourcing and investment opportunities BANGALORE, India-The deal was falling apart. Despite a week of flirtation and friendly negotiations, the two young Indian entrepreneurs rejected the offer from the group of Hoosier investors. Frustrated, the investors walked out of the hotel conference room. The chance to speculate on an Indian software startup called Picsquare.comhad fizzled. But none of the six Indiana business leaders was demoralized. After all, they'd crossed the globe to pursue business opportunities in...
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New FBI facility: tough case to crack: Government struggling to find site to build field office for bureauRestricted Content

February 20, 2006
Tammy Lieber
The highly-sought-after job of developing a new building for the FBI's Indianapolis field office is still in play, but it's hampered by the federal government's inability to find a site for the building. A bevy of local and national developers are expected to throw their hats in the ring to develop the building, which the Government Services Agency says needs to be 110,000 square feet. For the winner, it would be a high-profile project and one of the more significant...
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IPOs take minor dip in 2005: Analysts stay optimistic; 3 Indiana companies set to go public in early '06Restricted Content

January 30, 2006
Scott Olson
Three Indiana companies took the plunge to go public last year, two less than the number that did so in 2004. The state's slight dip in initial public offerings mirrors the slump in activity nationally. But Indiana appears to be off to a fast start for 2006. Three other Hoosier companies filed to go public late last year, but had yet to complete their IPOs by year's end. Overall, the number of companies that went public on the major U.S....
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Busy year, but no record: A Wellpoint deal leads list for second year in row, but 2005 lacks blockbusterRestricted Content

January 30, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
For the second year in a row, a giant Wellpoint deal led the pack. As much money was involved in Wellpoint's $6.7 billion acquisition of WellChoice Inc. as in the rest of the list combined. It was a huge deal by most any company's standard-except Wellpoint's. The year before, Wellpoint's $22.7 billion merger with Anthem Inc. led all deals and then some. Thanks to that single mega-deal, 2004's $31 billion list total shattered all previous local merger and acquisition records....
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Busy year, but no record: A Wellpoint deal leads list for second year in row, but 2005 lacks blockbusterRestricted Content

January 23, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
For the second year in a row, a giant Wellpoint deal led the pack. As much money was involved in Wellpoint's $6.7 billion acquisition of WellChoice Inc. as in the rest of the list combined. It was a huge deal by most any company's standard-except Wellpoint's. The year before, Wellpoint's $22.7 billion merger with Anthem Inc. led all deals and then some. Thanks to that single mega-deal, 2004's $31 billion list total shattered all previous local merger and acquisition records....
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IPOs take minor dip in 2005: Analysts stay optimistic; 3 Indiana companies set to go public in early '06Restricted Content

January 23, 2006
Scott Olson
Three Indiana companies took the plunge to go public last year, two less than the number that did so in 2004. The state's slight dip in initial public offerings mirrors the slump in activity nationally. But Indiana appears to be off to a fast start for 2006. Three other Hoosier companies filed to go public late last year, but had yet to complete their IPOs by year's end. Overall, the number of companies that went public on the major U.S....
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From FFA to DNA: Businesses view convention as more than a gathering of corn growersRestricted Content

January 16, 2006
Matthew Kish
Don't call it the Future Farmers of America. That went out of style with pastel suits and parachute pants. The organization is now known as the FFA. And it's no longer just a gathering of crop jockeys. The change in moniker partly illustrates why business leaders are so excited for the first of at least seven annual conventions the organization will stage in the Circle City starting in late October. "FFA is a premier, if not the premier, youth organization...
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Education, work force key hurdles to new economy:Restricted Content

January 2, 2006
Mark Miles
Having recently returned to Indiana after a 15-year absence, I see a region filled with both challenges and opportunities. The Central Indiana Corporate Partnership, the organization I've returned to serve as president and CEO, is focused on long-term economic prosperity for our region. To this end, our people are our most valuable resource. Unfortunately, central Indiana faces a significant challenge in making our human capital match our goal of a knowledgebased, 21st-century economy. Indiana ranks 46th in the educational attainment...
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In the new year, building on the successes of 2005:Restricted Content

January 2, 2006
Bart Peterson
This past year was one of the most active and successful in our city's history. We pushed through legislation to fund an expansion of the Indiana Convention Center and build a new multi-purpose stadium, both of which will be tremendous boons to our region's economy, pumping in more than $2.25 billion in investment and creating more than 4,200 permanent jobs over the next 10 years. In addition, through the leadership of the governor and legislature, a one-of-a-kind regional funding solution...
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VIEWPOINT: Indiana: The Cyber Crossroads of America?Restricted Content

December 26, 2005
Cameron Carter
Can a state whose identity as the "Crossroads of America" in the 20th century maintain that distinction in the 21st century? Can Indiana, with numerous railroads and highways passing through it, find a competitive advantage in a world that increasingly bypasses rails and roads in favor of the virtual marketplace? Absolutely-if it is willing once again to serve as a central hub for the thoroughfares so important to the virtual marketplace and purposefully sets out to build them. Not so...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Setting an example for SacramentoRestricted Content

November 28, 2005
"To improve Sacramento, learn from Indianapolis" was the headline of a column in the Nov. 18 Sacramento Business Journal. It's always nice to get a compliment and some good PR. Turns out a delegation of nearly a hundred Sacramentonians-or is it Sacramentites?-were here in October on a three-day study mission to learn how to become a great city. It was the seventh year in a row for them to make a learning visit to another community. Tom Stallard, head of...
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Mixed bag for tech parks: Facing heavy competition for tenants, some developments thrive while others struggleRestricted Content

November 21, 2005
Tom Murphy
The stretch of land along Interstate 74 near Shelbyville lies mostly vacant, save for a couple of buildings and a network of roads and other infrastructure snaking through the property. This barren look is not what Intelliplex Park organizers had in mind more than two years ago, when their project became one of the first to receive the state's certified technology park designation. "This is a lot harder than I thought it was going to be," said Tony Lennen, CEO...
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MASTER OF THE PLAN: Ultra-prepared president has Purdue primed for 'pre-eminence'Restricted Content

November 14, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
It's half-past eight on a Monday morning and Martin Jischke is at his desk, poring over notes. This is how Purdue University's president spends his days and most of his nights-preparing to be prepared. At any time, Jischke could be interacting with students, alumni, faculty, legislators or business leaders. He wants to be ready for their questions with clear, articulate answers, no matter the subject. His responses seem off-thecuff, but make no mistake: Jischke has studied and considered his position...
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There's more to logistics than forklifts and sweat: Colleges offer degrees for white-collar jobs in the fieldRestricted Content

October 31, 2005
Chris O\'malley
It's not sexy, but it's where the jobs are. Ivy Tech Community College will offer an associate's degree in logistics management, the latest effort in Indiana aimed at cultivating a work force for the transportation-distribution-logistics sector, known as TDL. Meanwhile, the University of Indianapolis is preparing a concentration in supply chain management that will have key applications in logistics careers. Experts say the educational push is sorely needed, yet it's still a challenge to get young people interested in the...
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Emerging Tech, Johnson centers team up: Partnership links incubator's startups with entrepreneurship studentsRestricted Content

October 24, 2005
Scott Olson
Now as executive director of Indiana University's Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, he has high hopes for his latest effort to introduce students to the real world of business. The Johnson Center, based in Bloomington, opened an office earlier this month at the Indiana University Emerging Technologies Center in downtown Indianapolis. The space gives MBA students the opportunity to provide consulting services to the 22 startups at the incubator. Unlike BSU seniors in the "spine-sweating" course who present an...
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BioStorage gets set for major expansion: Three-year-old local firm eyeing West Coast, EuropeRestricted Content

October 24, 2005
Scott Olson
The 60 industrial-size freezers standing in formation like soldiers at attention look unassuming from the outside, but their contents are invaluable. Stored at temperatures of minus-80 degrees Celsius, the millions of biological samples inside the far-west-side warehouse represent the future of disease research and drug development. The repository is operated by BioStorage Technologies, a 3-year-old venture created by a pair of researchers who met at the local office of Princeton, N.J.-based Covance Inc., a drug-development services firm. Oscar Moralez developed...
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VIEWPOINT: Ruling holds promise for life sciencesRestricted Content

October 24, 2005
Kristiana M.
It wasn't frontpage news when the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision on Merck KGaA v. Integra Lifesciences earlier this summer. But among Indiana's burgeoning life sciences sector, it should have been-n - largely because of the doors it opens (or appears to) for research-based discoveries. On June 13, the country's highest court ruled that a "safe harbor" provision in U.S. law gives life sciences companies more freedom to use patented compounds in pre-clinical research, as long as the...
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Backing home again: CID changes out-of-state course, invests $50M in IndianaRestricted Content

October 10, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's flagship venture capital firm has changed direction. Often criticized for not investing frequently enough within state lines, CID Equity Partners over the last five years has quietly put nearly $50 million to work in 10 Indiana companies. In the decade before, CID invested in just a half-dozen local deals. And after struggling to weather the 2001 recession, CID's managers believe the wind is finally at their back. Three years ago, massive losses threatened to sink the firm. Since then,...
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So far, VC deals scarce: BioCrossroads: Networking should spawn commitmentsRestricted Content

September 26, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Almost two years ago, in October 2003, BioCrossroads debuted its $73 million Indiana Future Fund. In the time since, just three Indiana startups have received IFF-backed investments. But it's not for BioCrossroads' lack of trying. Both in public and behind the scenes, BioCrossroads is working diligently to put promising local life sciences prospects in front of venture capitalists. This year, BioCrossroads has already held two well-publicized Indiana Future Fund Entrepreneurial Forums: the first in April at Purdue University in West...
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Aquarium lessons carry hope for spinal-cord patients:Restricted Content

September 19, 2005
-Scott Olson
Purdue University researcher Richard Borgens developed a fascination with nerve regeneration during childhood, when he watched the newts in his father's aquarium regrow legs bitten off by fish. Today, he's developing nerve-regeneration methods that may prove instrumental in treating spinal-cord injuries. Borgens directs Purdue's Center for Paralysis Research and is the founder of Andara Life Sciences Inc., a startup whose treatments are showing promise in clinical trials. One of Borgens' therapies involves the patented oscillating field stimulator device, which stimulates...
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EndGenitor might hold key to repairing blood vessels: Biomedical startup researchers grow cells from umbilical cord fluidRestricted Content

September 19, 2005
-Scott Olson
En d G e n i t o r Technologies Inc. is a prime example of the type of company BioCrossroads, central Indiana's life sciences initiative, covets. Founded on the scientific discoveries of two Indiana University School of Medicine researchers, the venture is on the cusp of producing stem cells that someday could repair the blood vessels of heart attack victims and diabetics. Drs. Mervin Yoder, 52, and David Ingram, 39, company cofounders and professors at the Herman B Wells...
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Economic developer for hire: Miller's brain trust spreads advice from town to countryRestricted Content

September 12, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
It's about soybeans and high hopes. Clinton County has only 34,148 residents, nearly half of them living in the county seat of Frankfort. Most of the labor force works in either farming or auto-parts manufacturing. Neither is generally considered the field of the future. Enter economic development consultant Thomas P. Miller & Associates. Since Clinton County is the state's fifth-largest soybean producer, TPMA counseled a strategy based on what it already does well. Starting next year, federal regulators will require...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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