Life Science & Biotech

VIEWPOINT: Signs of economic recovery all around usRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Barbara Branic
After weathering some difficult times over the last few years, there are encouraging signs that central Indiana has turned the corner on its road to economic recovery. The Indianapolis metro area added 22,000 jobs in the year ending in March-a 2.4-percent increase-and in May, the Indiana unemployment rate dipped below the national average for the first time since December. All signs point to continued modest growth. Patrick Barkey, IBJ contributor and Ball State University economist, says, "We should expect to...
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Eli Lilly spawns start-up: Maaguzi plans rapid growth selling software to manage clinical research trialsRestricted Content

August 15, 2005
Tom Murphy
Eli Lilly and Co. has sold clinical-research software it created to a veteran Indianapolis entrepreneur who plans to market it globally, potentially growing his startup company into one of the area's largest technology firms. Joe Huffine, best known as co-founder of the technology consultancy Onex Inc., said his new firm, Maaguzi LLC, should benefit as the market for research software grows explosively. Maaguzi's software allows researchers and patients to record data electronically instead of on paper. The software is geared...
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Quiet approach drawing criticism: President's lack of visibility hurts IU, some complainRestricted Content

August 8, 2005
Andrea Muirragui
Never mind the Herculean task of leading the state's largest college system in a difficult economic climate; he knew that would be hard. But after two years of long weeks and late nights, he's facing a more surprising challenge-defending himself from critics who question his ability to get the job done. IU seems to be adrift, naysayers argue, and so far Herbert doesn't seem to be doing much to get it back on course. "It is with great regret that...
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NOTIONS: Pugilism, Parkinson's, politics, DNA: a powerful combination set to winRestricted Content

July 25, 2005
Bruce Hetrick
If you knew only that Scott Newman is a former prosecutor, you might think his new workouts apt. The man known for courtroom sparring now feints, weaves, jabs and thrusts with a former Golden Gloves boxing champion. But that's not all we know about the 44-year-old Republican twice elected Marion County prosecutor. For in 2002, Newman also became Indianapolis' most public Parkinson's patient. Today, Newman says boxing provides the perfect exercise for the neurologically challenged. "Parkinson's is a movement disease,"...
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VIEWPOINT: Hoosiers gave tech transfer a big boostRestricted Content

July 18, 2005
Cam Carter
Today, we take for granted that our state universities play a role far beyond their traditional educational mission-especially in the economic arena. University-sponsored research is being licensed to the private sector, or used to form new companies. Universities are managing business incubators. Consulting partnerships between academia and industry are commonplace. It wasn't always this way. Not long ago, university officials were skeptical of becoming too involved with the private sector. Business leaders and investors didn't recognize the value of innovation...
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Diversity marketing gains steam in central Indiana: Ad agencies helping convey cultural revelancyRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Ethnic or diversity marketing, once confined to major cities such as Dallas, New York and Los Angeles, is taking hold in Indianapolis. "We have seen a gradual but growing response among clients to communicate to a multicultural audience," said Clyde Bodkin, president of locally based Bodkin Associates Inc. "Not everyone is in the same place, but smart companies are finding culturally sensitive, culturally relevant ways to communicate to their target markets." Diversity marketing is the fastest-growing sector of Bodkin's 14-person...
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Purdue, Regenstrief look for ways to trim health costs: Health & Hospital Association a 'real-world' partnerRestricted Content

July 11, 2005
Scott Olson
"Ultimately, we think the benefits of the partnership will be more efficient, costeffective care to the citizens of Indiana," Morr said. "The bottom line is, how can we do what we do better?" Small and medium-size hospitals, which typically do not have people on staff dedicated to study the types of issues the Regenstrief center will tackle, could benefit most from the affiliation, Morr said. Ed Abel, director in charge of health care services for the locally based Blue &...
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Taking the pulse of life sciences: Experts weigh in on whether Indiana is keeping up in the economic development raceRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
IBJ: Is Indiana gaining ground against other states in the race to grow as a life sciences hub? What are some specific benchmarks that underscore your opinion? JOHNSON: Indiana is gaining ground, but Indiana already starts on really very substantial ground. There are a lot of outside validations of that and I think it's important for this audience to hear a couple of them because there is nothing like having people on the outside pay attention to what we're doing...
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Med school takes hit: IU trims $5.2 million from budget, cuts 36 positionsRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Tom Murphy
The school tabled some construction plans and may have to curtail recruiting of "star" faculty in areas such as diabetes research, said Dr. Craig Brater, the school's dean. On top of that, the school cut 36 positions and halted spending for several programs after it was hit by decreases in state funding and grants, and a rise in expenses. Brater said the medical school has been lucky "in large part" to receive the funding it needed over the years. He...
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VIEWPOINT: Creativity is key to competitive advantageRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Christopher Vice
Central Indiana is flat as a result of the Laurentide ice sheet that surged toward Indianapolis 17,000 years ago. Today, the whole world is flat as a result of the technological and social seismic shifts that effectively leveled the economic world, and "accidentally made Beijing, Bangalore and Bethesda next-door neighbors," says Thomas L. Friedman, foreign affairs columnist for The New York Times. Richard Florida, researcher on regional economic development, challenges Friedman's metaphor. Florida says, "The world is even more concentrated,...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Indiana must not let TDL opportunities elude its graspRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Michael Snyder
Unlike some other Hoosier economic initiatives, much of the required infrastructure to rapidly advance TDL into significant growth is already in place. More Interstate highways cross the state An economic development analyst determining the physical advantages of Indiana might initially be challenged. Indiana has no oceans. No mountains. No temperate climate. But the Hoosier state does possess one singular unmatched physical plus: It is the state geographically closest to the bulk of most U.S. major markets. For more than a...
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Seed funding falling short: BioCrossroads to offer $6 million less than originally hopedRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
It's the Catch-22 of entrepreneurship. Attracting investment money is most difficult during the earliest days, exactly when startups need it most. BioCrossroads hopes to break that tricky cycle with its new $4 million seed-stage venture capital fund, Indiana Seed Fund I. But when fund raising was launched last year, the life sciences initiative aimed for $10 million. At about $250,000 per deal, BioCrossroads can do up to 15 deals-or two dozen fewer than it had intended. "We would certainly have...
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State eyes inland ports to bolster TDL: 'Dry' hubs under consideration in 3 parts of the state could be boon to transportation, distribution, logisticsRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Scott Olson
The construction of intermodal hubs in Indiana could add thousands of jobs to the state's transportation/distribution/logistics industry, an area targeted by officials as an economic pillar to pursue. The General Assembly gave the Indiana Ports Commission the authority two years ago to build the hubs-"dry ports" where cargo is transferred between train and truck. While the projects remain in the planning stages, supporters cite Indiana's central location as a primary factor to build the facilities. At least three locations are...
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Network Engineering Inc.: Computer firm remains flexible Owner says diversifying keeps company nimbleRestricted Content

June 6, 2005
Ed Callahan
He started the original version of his business back in 1984, fresh out of college. One Internet, one dot-com boom, one Y2K and one dot-com crash later, he's still in business. Spilker is president of Network Engineering Inc., which is essentially a spin-off of his original company, Information Engineering Inc. A lifelong Indianapolis resident, he graduated from Purdue University with a degree in computer technology. As soon as he graduated, he started Information Engineering because he wanted to run things...
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Finances another obstacle for Rose: University's money problems predate controversial leaderRestricted Content

May 23, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
In Terre Haute, his management style has come across like a bull in a china shop. Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology's faculty and students voted "no confidence" in his abilities. The university's staff will soon take a vote of its own, and an upcoming trustee meeting will likely address the matter. But as the tide of opinion turned against Rose-Hulman President Jack Midgley, detractors stopped asking a fundamentally important question: Could Midgley be right about the need for change? Last September,...
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Stutz's future includes condos: Developer envisions high-rise, nightclub as part of biz centerRestricted Content

May 9, 2005
Tammy Lieber
Stutz Business Center owner and visionary Turner Woodard last month rolled out a 10-year master plan for the Stutz that could bring condominiums, retail and a high-rise tower to the former auto-manufacturing plant at 10th Street and Capitol Avenue. Right now, Woodard concedes many of his plans are dreams. But with a blossoming life sciences corridor just to the west along the Central Canal, Woodard said he wants the 80-year-old Stutz to continue to be a hub of activity as...
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Twilight fund fades away: Meanwhile, six BioCrossroads-backed VCs are just getting startedRestricted Content

May 9, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Its specialty is developing local life sciences startups. But its partners can't raise any more money. So the sun is setting on Twilight Venture Partners. Meanwhile, the six venture capital firms BioCrossroads staked with its $73 million Indiana Future Fund have just three local investments to show among them. Venture investments take time, the six IFF recipients argue. And their first duty is to earn the high rate of return the IFF's organizers demand. That means significant proof of concept...
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Rose-Hulman aims for education, not incubation: Michigan-based EDF Ventures takes lead of Indiana Future Fund-backed partnership REI VenturesRestricted Content

May 9, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
The name is unchanged, but under Jack Midgley education comes first at Rose-Hulman Ventures. Business incubation is a distant second. And speculation on high-tech startups is outside the university's core mission. "The function of Ventures is education, because the function of Rose-Hulman is the education of engineers," said Midgley, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology's embattled president. "Ventures is not a separate entity. It's part of the undergraduate program at Rose-Hulman, like the math department or the mechanical engineering department." Named president...
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Forums seek out diamonds in rough: Future Fund events link VCs with entrepreneursRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Scott Olson
With $15 million to plow into early-stage companies, Indianapolis-based Pearl Street Venture Funds is one of several venture capital firms searching for promising technologies to fortify with a cash infusion. In return, the investors hope to stumble upon the next Eli Lilly and Co., or at the very least, an enterprise that eventually becomes profitable and attractive enough for acquisition. The process of locating such diamonds in the rough, however, can be arduous and time-consuming. To that end, the Indiana...
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Sales, new spec space in the cards at Intech: Intech One and Two likely to fetch top dollar, draw national interest, investment broker saysRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Tammy Lieber
Two years ago, Lauth Property Group Inc.'s Intech Park was arguably the most prominent sign of central Indiana's soft office market. The northwest-side park's largest buildings, Intech One and Two, had entire floors vacant and awaiting completion. Acterna LLC was pulling out of its 140,000-square-foot building, a retreat symbolic of the technology bust's effect on the larger suburban office market. Today, helped by a robust investment market and Intech's recent state designation as a certified technology park, Lauth hopes the...
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IU planning logistics center: University seeks funds for facility to provide services to TDL industryRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Indiana University officials say they're shopping for a site near the airport or in Plainfield for a laboratory to help grow the state's transportation-distribution-logistics industry-known as TDL. The IU Supply Chain Control Center would evaluate for companies the feasibility and cost benefits of new technologies that could be used to improve sourcing, production and product distribution. The service would be provided at no or little cost. But the center faces a logistics challenge of its own-a delivery of cash. IU...
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Experts see improving market: Higher occupancy rates, more construction projects mean good news for landlords, developersRestricted Content

April 25, 2005
IBJ: Is your sector of the construction or real estate industry better or worse off than a year ago and why? BURK: Overall, I think the Indianapolis office market is better off than it was a year ago. The occupancy rate for the 29-million-plus square feet of multitenant office properties in the market increased by about 2 percent last year, to 82.5 percent. There was positive net absorption of about 600,000 square feet, most of which occurred in the suburbs....
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Two Indiana startups chosen to compete nationally:Restricted Content

April 18, 2005
Tracy Donhardt
Two of the eight finalists that will participate in a national competition of bioscience startup companies at Purdue University are from Indiana. Omni Spray and QuadraSpec will compete in the third annual Purdue University Life Sciences Business Plan Competition against companies affiliated with several renowned universities, including Columbia University, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Johns Hopkins University. The companies will present business plans for bringing their products to market and be judged by a panel of venture capitalists,...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Be yourself-maximize your assetsRestricted Content

April 18, 2005
Be who you are. Conversely, don't try to be somebody you're not. Focus on what you do best, and you'll succeed. When we think of people who excel at anything ... Joshua Bell playing the violin, Reggie Miller shooting three-pointers, Dr. Lawrence Einhorn treating cancer ... we understand they have achieved their success by focusing on their God-given talents, developing them, and practicing, practicing, practicing. Communities are much the same, though the philosophy could be amended to read a more...
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Incubator lures biotech upstart: Fish vaccine biz hoping to land on canalRestricted Content

April 4, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Hatching new businesses is getting to be routine for Indiana University. So it was easy for Richard Wagner to contemplate moving his biotech startup from Columbus, Ohio, into IU's 2-year-old business incubator on the Central Canal. "It's an excellent facility. Every time I go up, I'm more and more impressed with it," Wagner said. "They put a lot of thought into designing it to meet the needs of life science and biotechnology research." Wagner, who holds a doctorate in plant...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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