News & Analysis

Flat passenger counts not seen as threat to paying debt on midfield terminalRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Chris O\'malley

The big debt payments on the $1.1 billion midfield terminal at Indianapolis International Airport start coming due in January--just as a recession hits and the battered airline industry cuts capacity. Despite the likely prospect of fewer passengers than projected in the next year or two, airport managers say they don't anticipate problems shouldering the roughly $40 million a year in debt burden over the next 30 years for the new facility.


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As politics finds new mediums, local firms are along for the rideRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Peter Schnitzler

In this year's election cycle, the policy watchword is "change." But amid the partisan debate, another type of change is revolutionizing the way candidates track voters and spread messages. Communication tools like text messaging, social networking and YouTube are increasingly integral to successful politics.

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Pacers cut costs, boost marketing to break even within three yearsRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

The Indiana Pacers are ratcheting up sales and marketing initiatives while cutting costs elsewhere in an effort to simultaneously ride out the economic storm and boost attendance. The team has little hope of being profitable this year-or even breaking even, said Pacers President Jim Morris, but he added that within three years the franchise's financial status should be much improved.


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Steak n Shake CEO ordering up cost cuts, but shares still sagRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Cory Schouten

The Steak n Shake Co. has dropped plans to build 20 new restaurants, is cutting overhead expenses by about $20 million, and closed 14 locations. The Indianapolis-based restaurant chain found $16 million in tax savings dating back to 2006 and is working on a new, simple menu built around burgers, fries and milkshakes--all part of a turnaround plan orchestrated by the chain's new CEO, Sardar Biglari.


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Martin professor's ouster sparks student protests

October 27, 2008
Scott Olson
Martin University students upset over the firing of a popular professor are staging protests over the direction the school has taken under new President Algeania Freeman. Freeman in January replaced the Rev. Boniface Hardin, a Benedictine monk who founded the inner-city school 30 years ago. She since has roiled many faculty members and students by letting go employees-many times without reason, they contend-as part of a strategy to cut costs. IBJ reported their concerns in July. But the Oct. 20...
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WellPoint, St. Francis battle over insurer's IT problemsRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
J.K. Wall

A year of computer snafus boiled over Oct. 13 when the St. Francis system declared WellPoint Inc. in breach of its contract because of habitually late payments.


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Gubernatorial candidates Daniels, Thompson see economic development differentlyRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jill Long Thompson promises to buoy Indiana's slumping rural counties with a three-tiered incentive plan. Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels has a different vision for stoking the state economy. He wants to build on Indiana's strengths--such as world-class research at universities--to innovate and create jobs.
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Lenders foreclose on at least 20 properties in mortgage schemeRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Cory Schouten

Charter Homes recruited and paid buyers to take out inflated mortgages on dozens of central Indiana homes it built, promising to manage the properties as rentals and make payments for the owners, current and former Charter business partners say.


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Entrepreneurs say businesses must act quickly to survive recessionRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's most seasoned entrepreneurs aren't standing idly by as the nation slides into what many economists believe will be the deepest recession since the early 1980s.
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Naming-rights deal puts Lucas Oil in competitive position

October 20, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
Emboldened by the deal he signed to put his company's name on the Indianapolis Colts' new home, Forrest Lucas has launched an arsenal of creative-some would say unorthodox-initiatives to fortify his growing company. Many of them are designed to help Lucas Oil Products Inc. go head to head with the oil industry's biggest players.
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Recession takes its toll on charitiesRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin

Area not-for-profits are beginning to feel the sting of the year-old credit crunch, which has escalated into a full-blown financial crisis that's battered investors and likely pushed the nation into recession.


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Conner Prairie balloon ride part of 10-year strategyRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Andrea Muirragui

Conner Prairie wants to pay homage to early aviator John Wise with a balloon ride that recalls his August 1859 trip from Lafayette at the helm of a gas-filled balloon bound for New York City with the nation's first air-mail delivery. An ill wind blew him Wisecourse, ending his flight in Crawfordsville, but he still earned a place in history--and a U.S. Postal Service-issued stamp honoring his pioneering effort.

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Economy-minded Honda bucks auto-industry slumpRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

Fueled by its line of gas-sipping economy cars, Honda is expanding in Indiana as car manufacturers almost everywhere else are shrinking. And the 2,000 jobs the Japanese automaker is promising in Greensburg by 2010 could be just the beginning.

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Lilly buys ImClone as part of strategy to capitalize on cancer-drug marketRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
J.K. Wall

Eli Lilly and Co. has written a $6.5 billion IOU to acquire the cancer drugs of ImClone Systems Inc. Cancer drugs are now the best-selling class of drugs in the world and one of the fastest growing.


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Real estate agents struggling from trickling home salesRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Sam Stall

The downturn in the housing market isn't tough just on people trying to sell their homes. It's also tough on the people who want to help those people sell their homes--real estate agents. Locally, their ranks have thinned as more and more leave the field to search for better prospects.


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Key races will decide who controls Indiana House of RepresentativesRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Peter Schnitzler

Most of Indiana's 100 House districts are strongly Democratic or strongly Republican. That means control of the House of Representatives will come down to a handful of battleground districts--probably fewer than a dozen, political experts say.


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Rooney's death spawns uncertainty for struggling insurance company, not-for-profitRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
J.K. Wall

After the unexpected death of insurance magnate J. Patrick Rooney, two organizations he led until the day he died are scrambling to figure out who will lead them into the future.


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Super Bowl group hires Sports Corp. official as CEORestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

The woman chosen as president and CEO of the city's Super Bowl host committee isn't exactly a household name, but those who hired her think she'll make Indianapolis the best host city ever. Allison Melangton, 46, is the first paid member of the 2012 Indianapolis Super Bowl Host Committee, and is expected to throw planning and organization into overdrive over the next 30 days.


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Nervous banks cut off some borrowers, tighten reins on othersRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Cory Schouten

Local companies that rely on credit have seen their borrowing power shrink and in some cases disappear as a deep freeze in the nation's credit markets drives fears of a broad economic slowdown. A handful of businesses, including a Greenwood security firm and an Indianapolis contractor, already have shut down after credit dried up, and others are on the ropes as troubled banks seek to limit their loan exposure.


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Pathway Productions gets new owner, new CEORestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

Pathway Productions, one of the city's highest-profile video production firms, has a new owner, a new CEO and a new plan to blaze a trail to prosperity. Michael Husain, who founded the company from his basement in 1996, earlier this year quietly sold a majority stake to Mays Chemical Co. President William Mays, who in turn named Jerald Harkness the new CEO.


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VC firm raises $116M for second fund after knocking first one out of parkRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Peter Schnitzler

Thanks to hefty 35-percent gross returns on its $60 million first fund, locally based Centerfield Capital Partners LP has raised nearly twice as much for its second. This month, the venture capital firm closed on $116 million from a variety of investors. As before, Centerfield's 50 limited partners include major Hoosier institutions. But this time, numerous big banks, insurance companies and pension funds from outside state lines were also investors.


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Retailers save on energy costs through innovative lighting, heating and coolingRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Sam Stall

With energy costs at historic highs, retailers are struggling to find ways to trim the cost of lighting, heating and cooling their stores and other facilities. The process of wringing out savings can be long, difficult and complex. However, the rewards are too substantial to ignore.


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Filing in legal battle over telecom company hints at criminal probe of officersRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Chris O\'malley

Former insiders of One Call Communications appear to be targets of a Justice Department criminal inquiry, according to a filing by the defunct company's court-appointed receiver. Pittsburgh-based Meridian Group said it was served a subpoena Sept. 19 from the U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania to testify before a grand jury on Oct. 21 on matters involving One Call.

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Emmis' market value in free fall as radio industry takes beatingRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

For more than two years, Smulyan, 61, has been unflaggingly optimistic during quarterly conference calls. But since early 2007, Emmis' stock has fallen 84 percent, shrinking the company's stock market value from $307 million to $48 million. The troubles have cast uncertainty over one of Indianapolis' highest-profile businesses.


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Simon Property Group exploring overseas marketsRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Cory Schouten

Simon Property Group Inc. has been readying its balance sheet and sizing up buyout targets in hopes of capitalizing on a worldwide markdown on shopping-center owners.


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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

  4. GOOD DAY to you I am Mr Howell Henry, a Reputable, Legitimate & an accredited money Lender. I loan money out to individuals in need of financial assistance. Do you have a bad credit or are you in need of money to pay bills? i want to use this medium to inform you that i render reliable beneficiary assistance as I'll be glad to offer you a loan at 2% interest rate to reliable individuals. Services Rendered include: *Refinance *Home Improvement *Inventor Loans *Auto Loans *Debt Consolidation *Horse Loans *Line of Credit *Second Mortgage *Business Loans *Personal Loans *International Loans. Please write back if interested. Upon Response, you'll be mailed a Loan application form to fill. (No social security and no credit check, 100% Guaranteed!) I Look forward permitting me to be of service to you. You can contact me via e-mail howellhenryloanfirm@gmail.com Yours Sincerely MR Howell Henry(MD)

  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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