Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Cancer society scouts Clarian property for development: Former retirement home may serve as a Hope LodgeRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Tom Murphy
An empty retirement home near Methodist Hospital may turn into a lodge that gives cancer patients a place to rest while they receive treatment in Indianapolis. The American Cancer Society is talking with Clarian Health Partners about planting a Hope Lodge on the site of the former Indianapolis Retirement Home, which sits across from Methodist on busy North Capitol Avenue. The cancer society operates 23 of these lodges in several states, but this would be the first Indiana location, according...
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Furnace maker picks Indy as hot spot for distribution: Lennox to move Illinois, Ohio operations to east sideRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Tammy Lieber
Lennox Industries Inc. is giving Indianapolis a vote of confidence as a logistics hub with plans to move distribution of its commercial heating and cooling products from facilities in Chicago and Columbus, Ohio, to the east side of Indianapolis. Although the distribution center is relatively small at 60,000 square feet, Lennox is one of a few companies that have abandoned distribution centers in other cities in favor of Indianapolis' low cost of real estate, central location and interstate access. Last...
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Schools follow different flight paths: Aviation programs see contrasting demandRestricted Content

June 27, 2005
Tracy Donhardtreporter
Two aircraft maintenance programs in close proximity to each other are far apart when it comes to successfully filling classrooms with budding mechanics. Times are so tough for Vincennes University's struggling aircraft maintenance program at Indianapolis International Airport's Aviation Technology Center that it asked for permission to conduct three non-aviation degree programs there. The aviation program, which enrolled about 300 students in the mid-1990s, now has about 75. Vincennes officials blame the United Airlines Maintenance hub closure, which displaced 1,200...
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Global mission: destroy, conquer: New law good news for shredding firmRestricted Content

June 20, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Indianapolis-based Global Shred Inc. plans to use a new federal rule that forces companies to destroy more documents as a springboard to expand into other states. The document-destruction provision of The Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act of 2003 went into effect June 1, requiring all businesses to shred, burn or pulverize credit and consumer reports. While many mom-and-pop shredding shops in the highly fragmented industry look to fortify their local position, Global Shred founder and owner David Kantor thinks...
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Shrinkage a growing problem: Manufacturers seek ways to stem product lossesRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
The U.S. manufacturing industry has begun rebounding from its economic swoon, but some industry experts think more manufacturers must become more efficient and eliminate waste if they are to compete in the current global climate. While the Manufacturers Alliance, an Arlington, Va.-based business and public policy research group, projected manufacturing growth of 3.4 percent this year and 3 percent in 2006, big challenges remain. One growing problem is the so-called shrinkage factor, defined in manufacturing as the percentage by which...
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Employers, workers dip toes in vanpool concept: Commuter service pushes cost savings, tax breaks to lure first ridersRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Six months after launching a carpooling and bus-riding effort, Central Indiana Commuter Services is still trying to convince the city's car-cozy commuters to get aboard its vanpooling program. The first CICS van has yet to roll people to and from work, even as 553 people have begun to carpool and 1,251 others wait to be matched with other carpoolers. Instead, the vans have been motoring to office parks as part of a road show to win over employers and workers....
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Indiana must not let TDL opportunities elude its graspRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Michael Snyder
Unlike some other Hoosier economic initiatives, much of the required infrastructure to rapidly advance TDL into significant growth is already in place. More Interstate highways cross the state An economic development analyst determining the physical advantages of Indiana might initially be challenged. Indiana has no oceans. No mountains. No temperate climate. But the Hoosier state does possess one singular unmatched physical plus: It is the state geographically closest to the bulk of most U.S. major markets. For more than a...
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State eyes inland ports to bolster TDL: 'Dry' hubs under consideration in 3 parts of the state could be boon to transportation, distribution, logisticsRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Scott Olson
The construction of intermodal hubs in Indiana could add thousands of jobs to the state's transportation/distribution/logistics industry, an area targeted by officials as an economic pillar to pursue. The General Assembly gave the Indiana Ports Commission the authority two years ago to build the hubs-"dry ports" where cargo is transferred between train and truck. While the projects remain in the planning stages, supporters cite Indiana's central location as a primary factor to build the facilities. At least three locations are...
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Purdue student plays key role in "RFID for Dummies": Book helps businesses implement logistics technologyRestricted Content

June 13, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Patrick Sweeney was the book's author. Most other books on RFID consider only the highly technical aspects of the technology, Sweeney said. "RFID for Dummies" is aimed at businesspeople charged with actually implementing the technology, or for those who determine its ROI. "This is really the first book of its kind that walks people through the logical process to deploy an RIFD system," Sweeney said. The cost of implementing RFID is based For an up-and-coming new technology like radio frequency...
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Trade zone gets bigger: Expansion should help Duke, Anderson lure tenants who export, import goodsRestricted Content

June 6, 2005
Tammy Lieber
An expansion of Indianapolis' foreign trade zone to include Duke Realty Corp.'s west-side industrial parks might not result in a flood of new tenants for the local developer, but it's expected to help economic development officials lure firms that ship goods by truck and rail. Officials of Duke and central Indiana economic development agencies were to announce on June 3 that the local foreign trade zone has been expanded from 5,500 acres around the Indianapolis International Airport to 7,100 acres....
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Long commute for former Lt. Gov.: Kathy Davis to lead South Bend tech firmRestricted Content

June 6, 2005
Peter Schnitzler
Her days as lieutenant governor are finished, but it didn't take Kathy Davis long to find a new management role. She's accepted a job leading South Bend-based telecommunications connectivity provider Global Access Point. "After we lost [the election] and I knew I'd be looking for a job, I thought it would be ideal if I could find some entrepreneur who was very technical and needed some help on the management side," Davis said. "Then I was fortunate that opportunity came...
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VIEWPOINT: Eastern time zone is Hoosiers' best betRestricted Content

May 30, 2005
Michael Wells
The Indiana General Assembly crusade to enact daylight-saving time legislation was legendary. The rising and falling fortunes, near-defeats and ultimate success have been well-chronicled. It turns out, however, that one battle may be over, but the fight still must go on. An amendment to the original legislation requires the General Assembly and Gov. Mitch Daniels to petition the U.S. Department of Transportation to hold hearings throughout the state. The reason: to determine what time zone (Eastern or Central) the 77...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: With growth at both ends, job spectrum requires skillRestricted Content

May 30, 2005
Patrick Barkey
When you study economic statistics for a living, it's easy to lose perspective on a lot of things. Take the labor market, for instance. In any given month, millions of American workers are hired and fired, promoted, demoted and transferred. Some drop out of the labor force to raise children or to go to school, while others retire altogether or begin new careers. When the smoke clears after all those changes, the statisticians in Indiana and in Washington tally it...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Vibrant city can be built without oceans, mountainsRestricted Content

May 23, 2005
In late April and early May, two things happened. The Legislature adjourned on time and Forbes magazine released its seventh annual list of the best (and worst) metro areas to develop businesses and careers. Forbes based its ranking on business costs, living costs, education levels of the work force, qualityof-life issues as well as job and income growth and migration patterns. Indianapolis ranked 33rd out of 150 of the country's largest metro areas, and there's some good news in that...
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Local company launches technical think tank: Wolf Technical Services seeks broader customer baseRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
A low-profile Indianapolis research firm is emerging from the shadows to raise its profile and grab more business. Wolf Technical Services Inc., which until earlier this year had focused on forensic studies and accident re-creation, enlisted former University of Indianapolis President Ben Lantz last year to launch a new division that is winning contracts that focus on the future rather than re-creating the past. Already, Wolf's new division to develop problem-solving technology has done work for IndyGo, Riley Hospital for...
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The old college try: Struggling IndyGo courting campuses to boost ridershipRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Chris O\'malley
One solution for a city bus system struggling to lure riders might be academic-get college students on board. The Indianapolis Public Transportation Corp. is in talks with colleges and vocational schools about the potential of discounted fares for students who opt to take the bus to and from campus. The push also has a longer-term goal of conditioning students to use public transportation after they graduate to the work world. Financially sputtering IndyGo, which finished 2004 in the black only...
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IU planning logistics center: University seeks funds for facility to provide services to TDL industryRestricted Content

May 2, 2005
Chris O\'malley
Indiana University officials say they're shopping for a site near the airport or in Plainfield for a laboratory to help grow the state's transportation-distribution-logistics industry-known as TDL. The IU Supply Chain Control Center would evaluate for companies the feasibility and cost benefits of new technologies that could be used to improve sourcing, production and product distribution. The service would be provided at no or little cost. But the center faces a logistics challenge of its own-a delivery of cash. IU...
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Experts see improving market: Higher occupancy rates, more construction projects mean good news for landlords, developersRestricted Content

April 25, 2005
IBJ: Is your sector of the construction or real estate industry better or worse off than a year ago and why? BURK: Overall, I think the Indianapolis office market is better off than it was a year ago. The occupancy rate for the 29-million-plus square feet of multitenant office properties in the market increased by about 2 percent last year, to 82.5 percent. There was positive net absorption of about 600,000 square feet, most of which occurred in the suburbs....
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Neuburger's new gig opens door for expanded FINA role:Restricted Content

April 25, 2005
Anthony Schoettle
Pros Consulting, an Indianapolis-based firm with a national reputation in the parks and recreation industry, has hired one of the biggest local names in sports and event management to help grow its firm in a new direction. Dale Neuburger, who stepped down as president of the Indiana Sports Corp. earlier this month, joined Pros as vice president of sport strategy and development. Neuburger, who headed ISC for 12 years, carries international clout-especially in Olympic sports. Pros founder and President Leon...
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Plainfield, Avon work on land annexation agreement: Pact could pave way for mammoth industrial park by Browning InvestmentsRestricted Content

April 25, 2005
Scott Olson
Officials from the towns of Plainfield and Avon are negotiating to share annexation of a large parcel of unincorporated land that a mammoth industrial and distribution park will be built upon. Locally based developer Browning Investments Inc. has much of the 1,100-acre tract north of its Plainfield AirTech Business Park in Hendricks County under contract. When finished, the decade-long project will boast 15 million square feet of space, almost equaling the entire Plainfield industrial market. It dwarfs the 5.5-million-square-foot AirTech...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: General Assembly's shooting the three! Boom Baby!Restricted Content

April 25, 2005
Ed Feigenbaum
Typically, when lawmakers are this near to reaching agreement on a state budget, it's some time in early or mid-May, and we're trying to pepper this column with analogies to the Indianapolis 500. However, we started the year with a race analogy-the one about Mario Andretti suggesting that if you felt like you were under control you weren't going fast enough-and since the Indiana Pacers seemed destined for a brief playoff run this year, we probably ought to stick to...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Pondering the world from an economist's viewpointRestricted Content

April 18, 2005
Patrick Barkey
In case you've ever wondered what it is like to look at life through the eyes of an economist, here are some questions to ponder: Has anyone else noticed that public schools these days are in the transportation business, the sports entertainment business, the restaurant business, the health care business, not to mention the day care business? It's no wonder their jobs are so difficult. To those who decry the risk of diverting Social Security revenue towards personal accounts in...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Be yourself-maximize your assetsRestricted Content

April 18, 2005
Be who you are. Conversely, don't try to be somebody you're not. Focus on what you do best, and you'll succeed. When we think of people who excel at anything ... Joshua Bell playing the violin, Reggie Miller shooting three-pointers, Dr. Lawrence Einhorn treating cancer ... we understand they have achieved their success by focusing on their God-given talents, developing them, and practicing, practicing, practicing. Communities are much the same, though the philosophy could be amended to read a more...
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Accounting firm looks overseas for help: Sarbanes-Oxley business sparks need for extra handsRestricted Content

April 18, 2005
Scott Olson
Zietsman is one of several employees of PricewaterhouseCoopers who are in the United States to temporarily help the global accounting firm complete client audit work created by the 2002 Sarbanes-Oxley corporate-accountability law. One rule, Section 404, requires corporations to assess the internal accounting controls they have in place to ensure their financial reporting is accurate and reliable-and requires accounting firms to vouch for those controls. Many public companies had to devote thousands of employee hours and millions of dollars to...
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New rules, players mean different conference session STATEHOUSE DISPATCH:Restricted Content

April 11, 2005
Ed Feigenbaum
This is about the time each year when I write about the advent of the conference committee process, the black hole that not even the Stephen Hawkings of the legislative process can fathom. Just when you have figured out the session dynamics-leadership, partisan mischief, interconnections between issues and bills, and the relationships among key lawmakers-conference committees begin and all your presumed understanding flies out the window. Regardless of all the pablum you may hear about rules, what issues may be...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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