In-Depth Report

Executive pay continues on upswing

May 24, 2014
Dan Human
The median senior executive collected $923,705 in salary, stock or stock options, incentive pay and perks in 2013, IBJ found in a review of proxy statements at 64 companies.The median compensation rose 20 percent from 2012 and doubled since 2006.
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Special Report: City's building spree leaves trail of spoilsRestricted Content

August 24, 2013
Kathleen McLaughlin
Mayor Greg Ballard takes pride in Rebuild Indy, the city’s nearly $400 million program that doubled the volume of public works projects—and became engineering and construction firms' largest business opportunity with the city in more than a decade.
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City bans bulk land-bank sales after lopsided deal with not-for-profit

November 3, 2012
Cory Schouten
Indianapolis last year sold 154 properties from its land bank for $1,000 each to a novice not-for-profit, which immediately flipped them for a total $500,000 profit. More than a dozen have changed hands multiple times since then, making investors more than $1 million. (with interactive map)
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SPECIAL REPORT: Stock-based pay builds wealth for Indiana execsRestricted Content

June 2, 2012
Greg Andrews
IBJ's annual review of proxy statements for Indiana public companies found senior executives' median compensation rose 14 percent in 2011. But that analysis uses the fair market value of stock and options awards on the date they were granted. If a company's stock price surges, executives can make out far better. (with searchable database)
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Crean, Painter contracts packed with rewards for postseason success

March 10, 2012
Anthony Schoettle
Indiana University Coach Tom Crean and Purdue University Coach Matt Painter cash in big time when their teams perform well, especially in postseason play.
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Airport execs' globetrotting sparks scrutiny

March 10, 2012
Chris O'Malley
Indianapolis Airport Authority CEO John Clark and two key officers spent more than $67,000 last year on travel that included extended business trips to Brazil, Denmark, Greece, Morocco and Switzerland.
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BioCrossroads has stoked state's life sciences industry, but challenges remainRestricted Content

February 11, 2012
J.K. Wall
In the 10 years BioCrossroads has been promoting life sciences in Indiana, the effort has netted more than 330 new companies, an infusion of more than $330 million in venture capital, a tripling of exports, and a growing number of mentions in national reports on life sciences.
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Warnings about broker's tactics went unheeded

December 17, 2011
Cory Schouten
Several state employees openly questioned how John Bales' real estate brokerage did business long before the FBI launched an investigation that led to his indictment.
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Pro athletes' charities often have limited life spansRestricted Content

July 23, 2011
Kathleen McLaughlin
Wealth and fame often lead professional athletes to share their success in the charitable arena, but those efforts rarely last much longer than their careers as the organizations struggle to survive in an already-crowded philanthropic field.
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Critics: City's effort to help ex-offenders ineffectiveRestricted Content

June 11, 2011
Francesca Jarosz
Three years after Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard launched a city office designed to help ex-offenders avoid a repeat prison visit, some of those original supporters say the city’s Office of Re-Entry Initiatives not only has fallen short of that goal but has accomplished little else.
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CEOs see stock windfall after market crashRestricted Content

May 28, 2011
J.K. Wall
Executives at Indiana’s public companies got rich in the down-and-up market, even when investors didn't. CNO Financial's Jim Prieur, for example, received stock grants now worth $4.4M, despite share prices that are 40 percent lower than three years ago. With searchable database.
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Reform law gives charters leeway to hire unlicensed teachers

May 7, 2011
Francesca Jarosz
Legislation that expands charter schools in Indiana also could increase the number of teachers at those schools without licenses, making it easier for educators like Eric Nentrup to take non-traditional paths to the classroom.
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New laws hang teacher pay on performance

May 7, 2011
J.K. Wall
Charters and vouchers may have sparked the loudest education-related protests before the Legislature this year, but changes to teacher evaluations are likely to have the biggest impact on Indiana’s public schools.
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Controversy brews over judging charter performance

April 2, 2011
J.K. Wall
There is little agreement—but lots of politics and complex statistics—on how to define success and failure in Indiana’s public schools.
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SPECIAL REPORT: Indiana companies charge into China

March 26, 2011
Greg Andrews
With economic growth in the United States sluggish, Indiana companies are joining the race to capitalize on the fast-growing Chinese economy—even as hundreds of millions of Chinese move into the middle class and adopt a Western-style thirst for goods and services.
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Partisan divide could threaten long-term education reform

February 26, 2011
Francesca Jarosz
Indiana’s Republican-controlled Legislature will likely pass the bulk of education-reform measures being pushed this year by party heavyweights, but partisan rancor could threaten the long-term prospects for a sweeping overhaul of the state’s public schools.
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Dual roles give Bess unusual view into schools

February 26, 2011
J.K. Wall
Bess Watch VideoAs a Danville school board member and superintendent of Indianapolis Metropolitan High, Scott Bess is straddling the increasingly contentious chasm between traditional public schools and privately operated charters.
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Charter school's nimble approach could become the norm

January 29, 2011
Francesca Jarosz, J.K. Wall
Indianapolis Metropolitan High School implemented a school-wide overhaul in its educational approach in only three months. The charter school might be the face of the future for all Indiana public schools.
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City vendor may get $1.2B from parking-privatization deal

August 28, 2010
Cory Schouten
The pitch from Mayor Greg Ballard’s administration to privatize the city's parking meters is compelling, but the proposal to sell the meters to Dallas-based Affiliated Computer Services Inc. has the city giving up more in the long run than is immediately apparent.
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Bond swaps cost city units $93M in penalties

July 3, 2010
Cory Schouten
Wall Street bankers for decades sold municipalities like Indianapolis on debt instruments called swaps as a safe way to reduce borrowing costs and hedge against rising interest rates. In reality, the swaps were complicated bets that relied on misguided assumptions, and taxpayers paid.
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Soft Landing: Pay slipped for most execs in 2009, but cuts weren't deep

May 22, 2010
Peter Schnitzler
Top executives at Indiana's public companies have largely been insulated from the economic crash. IBJ's review of executive pay found that, although 131 of the 238 executives listed in proxy statements the past two years saw annual compensation fall in 2009, only 10 experienced cuts of more than $1 million.
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SPECIAL REPORT: Brizzi ordered lenient deal for business partner's client

April 3, 2010
Cory Schouten
Marion County Prosecutor Carl Brizzi last year intervened in a major drug case to offer a reduced sentence over objections from both law enforcement officers and his own deputy prosecutors.
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Brizzi's lease deals benefited friend, donor

March 13, 2010
Cory Schouten
Records show Marion County Prosecutor Carl Brizzi directed lucrative work for the Prosecutor's Office to his friend, business partner and political contributor John Bales.
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Related-party loans pile up at Durham-owned finance firm

October 24, 2009
Greg Andrews
Indianapolis businessman Tim Durham has treated Ohio-based Fair Finance Co. almost like a personal bank since buying it seven years ago, and now he, his partners and related firms owe it more than $168 million, records show.
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Half of state's public-company CEOs saw pay rise in 2008

June 22, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
For investors, 2008 was the worst year since the Great Depression. Even so, more than half of the state's public-company executives saw the value of their pay packages rise from 2007—despite the fact that only 10 of the companies posted a positive total return in 2008, and 46 companies shed more than one-third of their stock market value.
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  1. I am a Lyft driver who is a licensed CDL professional driver. ALL Lyft drivers take pride in providing quality service to the Indianapolis and surrounding areas, and we take the safety of our passengers and the public seriously.(passengers are required to put seat belts on when they get in our cars) We do go through background checks, driving records are checked as are the personal cars we drive, (these are OUR private cars we use) Unlike taxi cabs and their drivers Lyft (and yes Uber) provide passengers with a clean car inside and out, a friendly and courteous driver, and who is dressed appropriately and is groomed appropriately. I go so far as to offer mints, candy and/or small bottle of water to the my customers. It's a mutual respect between driver and passenger. With Best Regards

  2. to be the big fish in the little pond of IRL midwest racin' when yer up against Racin' Gardner

  3. In the first sentance "As a resident of one of these new Carmel Apartments the issue the local governments need to discuss are build quality & price." need a way to edit

  4. As a resident of one of these new Carmel Apartments the issue the local governments need to discuss is build quality & price. First none of these places is worth $1100 for a one bedroom. Downtown Carmel or Keystone at the Crossing in Indy. It doesn't matter. All require you to get in your car to get just about anywhere you need to go. I'm in one of the Carmel apartments now where after just 2.5 short years one of the kitchen cabinet doors is crooked and lawn and property maintenance seems to be lacking my old Indianapolis apartment which cost $300 less. This is one of the new star apartments. As they keep building throughout the area "deals" will start popping up creating shoppers. If your property is falling apart after year 3 what will it look like after year 5 or 10??? Why would one stay here if they could move to a new Broad Ripple in 2 to 3 years or another part of the Far Northside?? The complexes aren't going to let the "poor" move in without local permission so that's not that problem, but it the occupancy rate drops suddenly because the "Young" people moved back to Indy then look out.

  5. Why are you so concerned about Ace hardware? I don't understand why anyone goes there! Every time ive gone in the past, they don't have what I need and I end up going to the big box stores. I understand the service aspect and that they try to be helpful but if they are going to survive I think they might need to carry more specialty parts.

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