Public Companies

Dan Laikin on sidelines as others admit guilt in stock-manipulation schemeRestricted Content

April 27, 2009
Greg Andrews
Carmel businessman Dan Laikin finds himself in the awkward spot of denying wrongdoing at the same time the three men accused of conspiring with him in a stock-manipulation scheme are admitting guilt.
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Simon family's interests helped city thrive, but taxpayers paid the price

April 20, 2009
Cory Schouten
The Simon family's role in building the city has come at a steep price for taxpayers. Simon and its business interests in the last 20 years have collected local government incentives worth more than $400 million, an IBJ tally of those deals shows.
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$4.7B WellPoint deal leaves workers in limbo

April 13, 2009
J.K. Wall
Investors cheered this morning after WellPoint Inc. agreed to sell its pharmacy management unit to Express Scripts Inc., but the fate of about 2,100 WellPoint employees now is up in the air.
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WellPoint to sell subsidiary for $4.6B

April 13, 2009
J.K. Wall
WellPoint Inc. has agreed to sell its pharmacy benefits management arm for $4.675 billion in cash and stock to St. Louis-based Express Scripts, the companies announced April 13.
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Omnicity seeks financial turnaround, has 28 acquisitions in mind

April 13, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Dick Beltzhoover, a private investor in Omnicity Corp., a Carmel-based wireless broadband provider, has quietly taken the company public and has lofty plans to expand nationwide.
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Duke upends growth plan, focuses on paying debtRestricted Content

March 16, 2009
Greg Andrews
In this horrendous environment, nothing is more important for a debt-laden public company than proving it can pay its bills
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Durham insider deal sparks outcry

March 9, 2009
Greg Andrews
Tim Durham is facing allegations of self-dealing after a publicly traded company he helps run in Dallas acquired assets from a finance company he owns in Ohio.
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Mall giant says it's in good shape, but takes steps to conserve cashRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
Cory Schouten
Despite assurances of strength, Simon Property Group Inc. has decided to pay 90 percent of its dividend in stock, a move that allows the company to hold onto $925 million in cash this year but could alienate shareholders drawn by the dividend.
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Stock declines could make public companies takeover targetsRestricted Content

January 26, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Not so long ago, most Indiana public companies were firmly in control of their destinies. Now after seeing their stock prices plunge, many would , be little more than sitting ducks were outsiders to launch takeover bids. If anybody's still got the money and chutzpah to buy, that is.
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Lilly makes $6.5B acquisitionRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly and Co. CEO John Lechleiter played a game of pharmaceutical poker with former Lilly Chief Financial Officer Jim Cornelius—and won.
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Activist shakes up Steak n Shake after taking controlRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
Cory Schouten
After months of agitating for changes at The Steak n Shake Co., investor Sardar Biglari finally got a shot at putting his theories into action.
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WellPoint shares sufferRestricted Content

December 29, 2008
J.K. Wall
It was a bad year to be a shareholder of most companies. But the value of the Indianapolis-based health insurer's stock lost more than 55 percent of its value during the year.
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Indians score $1.23 million profitRestricted Content

December 22, 2008
The Indianapolis Indians made $1.23 million this year on $8.7 million in revenue, according to the publicly traded company's most recent financial disclosure.
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Kite drops about 10 percent of its staff as retail market floundersRestricted Content

December 15, 2008
Cory Schouten
Kite Realty Group Trust has joined local peers Duke Realty Corp. and Lauth Group Inc. in laying off employees as it copes with dried-up credit and a soft retail market.
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Bold bets on Hoosier firms yield horrific results so farRestricted Content

December 8, 2008
Greg Andrews
The millions of dollars they plunked down to buy stock in local companies over the past two years have shriveled in value, leaving them way, way below break-even.
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State public company execs grab up stock as prices fallRestricted Content

December 1, 2008
J.K. Wall
The unprecedented plunge on Wall Street the last three months has spurred a couple of dozen executives and directors at Indiana public companies to scoop up shares in their own companies.
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Analyzing intrinsic value unearths some bargain stocksRestricted Content

December 1, 2008
Ken Skarbeck
investors looking at business valuations likely will conclude there are companies selling at prices less than their intrinsic values.
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Green Mountain entrepreneur compiles 17-percent stake in struggling Noble Roman's

November 24, 2008
Cory Schouten
Robert P. Stiller, a lifelong entrepreneur who built Green Mountain into a wholesale coffee giant with 7,000 customers and $500 million in revenue, owns 3.4 million shares, or 17 percent of the Noble Roman's company.
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HHGregg looks to grow as other consumer electronic businesses falterRestricted Content

November 24, 2008
Greg Andrews
HH Gregg has grown from a local to a national consumer electronic store chain and has its eye on expanding further, given Circuit City's bankruptcy filing.
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Steak n Shake seeks younger customersRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
Cory Schouten
Steak n Shake hopes to create buzz with its new marketing plan targeting youth.
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Emmis struggling to stay in good stead with lendersRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
Greg Andrews
Emmis Communications Corp. struggles to contain expenses and minimize debts due to radio advertising shortfalls.
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Former Conseco director liable for some unpaid stock loansRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
J.K. Wall
Dennis E. Murray Sr. was declared liable in October by U.S. District Court Judge Larry J. McKinney for at least some of the millions of dollars he borrowed to buy Conseco stock in the late 1990s.
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Steak n Shake CEO ordering up cost cuts, but shares still sagRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Cory Schouten

The Steak n Shake Co. has dropped plans to build 20 new restaurants, is cutting overhead expenses by about $20 million, and closed 14 locations. The Indianapolis-based restaurant chain found $16 million in tax savings dating back to 2006 and is working on a new, simple menu built around burgers, fries and milkshakes--all part of a turnaround plan orchestrated by the chain's new CEO, Sardar Biglari.


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Emmis' market value in free fall as radio industry takes beatingRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Anthony Schoettle

For more than two years, Smulyan, 61, has been unflaggingly optimistic during quarterly conference calls. But since early 2007, Emmis' stock has fallen 84 percent, shrinking the company's stock market value from $307 million to $48 million. The troubles have cast uncertainty over one of Indianapolis' highest-profile businesses.


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Simon Property Group exploring overseas marketsRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Cory Schouten

Simon Property Group Inc. has been readying its balance sheet and sizing up buyout targets in hopes of capitalizing on a worldwide markdown on shopping-center owners.


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  1. to mention the rest of Molly's experience- she served as Communications Director for the Indianapolis Department of Public Works and also did communications for the state. She's incredibly qualified for this role and has a real love for Indianapolis and Indiana. Best of luck to her!

  2. Shall we not demand the same scrutiny for law schools, med schools, heaven forbid, business schools, etc.? How many law school grads are servers? How many business start ups fail and how many business grads get low paying jobs because there are so few high paying positions available? Why does our legislature continue to demean public schools and give taxpayer dollars to charters and private schools, ($171 million last year), rather than investing in our community schools? We are on a course of disaster regarding our public school attitudes unless we change our thinking in a short time.

  3. I agree with the other reader's comment about the chunky tomato soup. I found myself wanting a breadstick to dip into it. It tasted more like a marinara sauce; I couldn't eat it as a soup. In general, I liked the place... but doubt that I'll frequent it once the novelty wears off.

  4. The Indiana toll road used to have some of the cleanest bathrooms you could find on the road. After the lease they went downhill quickly. While not the grossest you'll see, they hover a bit below average. Am not sure if this is indicative of the entire deal or merely a portion of it. But the goals of anyone taking over the lease will always be at odds. The fewer repairs they make, the more money they earn since they have a virtual monopoly on travel from Cleveland to Chicago. So they only comply to satisfy the rules. It's hard to hand public works over to private enterprise. The incentives are misaligned. In true competition, you'd have multiple roads, each build by different companies motivated to make theirs more attractive. Working to attract customers is very different than working to maximize profit on people who have no choice but to choose your road. Of course, we all know two roads would be even more ridiculous.

  5. The State is in a perfect position. The consortium overpaid for leasing the toll road. Good for the State. The money they paid is being used across the State to upgrade roads and bridges and employ people at at time most of the country is scrambling to fund basic repairs. Good for the State. Indiana taxpayers are no longer subsidizing the toll roads to the tune of millions a year as we had for the last 20 years because the legislature did not have the guts to raise tolls. Good for the State. If the consortium fails, they either find another operator, acceptable to the State, to buy them out or the road gets turned back over to the State and we keep the Billions. Good for the State. Pat Bauer is no longer the Majority or Minority Leader of the House. Good for the State. Anyway you look at this, the State received billions of dollars for an assett the taxpayers were subsidizing, the State does not have to pay to maintain the road for 70 years. I am having trouble seeing the downside.

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