Economic Analysis

HICKS: Corporate profits don't deserve condescensionRestricted Content

April 23, 2011
Mike Hicks
Profits are much maligned, and the profit motive is oft depicted as synonymous with greed. This is disheartening. Disdain drawn from ignorance is intellectually lazy.
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HICKS: Economic activity stalls when taxes riseRestricted Content

April 16, 2011
Mike Hicks
We know from long experience that, if you raise taxes, you get less economic activity, even if higher tax rates make some people work harder.
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HICKS: Right-to-work laws make economic senseRestricted Content

April 9, 2011
Mike Hicks
There is abundant research on the economic effects of right-to-work laws by economists of both the right and left. The results are pretty clear that right-to-work legislation leads to increased employment.
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HICKS: General Assembly puts foolishness on displayRestricted Content

April 2, 2011
Mike Hicks
We need the remaining month of this Legislature to look a lot less like the last month.
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HICKS: Debt a bigger problem than who bought itRestricted Content

March 26, 2011
Mike Hicks
purchasing our debt and being our banker are different matters altogether.
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HICKS: Education reform deserves bipartisan supportRestricted Content

March 19, 2011
Mike Hicks
The goal of the legislation is to give public schools more incentives to improve.
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HICKS: Unfortunately, veteran tuition benefits must be cutRestricted Content

March 12, 2011
Mike Hicks
It's a wide entitlement program that will literally explode in the coming decades, since a third of all combat veterans will meet the disability requirements. It is not sustainable, and the Senate just tightened the requirements.
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HICKS: Telecom reform in Indiana workedRestricted Content

March 5, 2011
Mike Hicks
Deregulation of monopolies tends to almost always make consumers better off. Indiana’s broad and effective telecommunications reform of 2006 is a classic example of this.
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HICKS: Uncertainty always leads to oil-price fluctuationsRestricted Content

February 26, 2011
Mike Hicks
Being a commodity, changes to oil prices are frequent and instantaneous. Changes to supply or demand of petroleum in the Middle East affect the price at the pump in the Midwest within hours.
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HICKS: Productivity gains make for jobless recovery

February 19, 2011
Mike Hicks
It is an old story, but a nevertheless disheartening one. It is also a tale rich in its implications for young workers.
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HICKS: Trimming government fat tough, but necessaryRestricted Content

February 12, 2011
Mike Hicks
Recognizing inefficiency in government is far more difficult than rhetoric suggests. The private sector has the blessing of the profits to guide decisions.
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HICKS: Deciphering economy a confusing pursuitRestricted Content

February 4, 2011
Mike Hicks
A casual observer of news about economic indicators has more than enough reason to be puzzled.
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HICKS: President should focus on reducing debt burdenRestricted Content

January 29, 2011
Mike Hicks
What worried me most about the president’s speech was not what he said, but what he didn’t.
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HICKS: Earmarks need overhaul, but they aren't entirely badRestricted Content

January 22, 2011
Mike Hicks
Our influential senior senator, Richard Lugar, and 6th District congressman, Mike Pence, disagree on an outright ban on earmarks. This is a rare case in which the differing concerns of both men are right.
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HICKS: Civility matters, but don't blame murder on wordsRestricted Content

January 15, 2011
Mike Hicks
In the wake of the shooting, the loudest debate centers on the heated level of political discourse and its presumed effect on a shooter.
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HICKS: Economist job more exciting than most think

January 8, 2011
Mike Hicks
Recently, my wife has stopped calling me an economist. It is too hard to explain what I do, so she calls me a professor (which has far more cool points to Harry Potter or Gilligan’s Island fans).
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HICKS: Why economic forecasting is inexact scienceRestricted Content

January 1, 2011
Mike Hicks
Forecasts are primarily used as a tool to begin, not end, conversations about business and government matters.
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HICKS: Let's fight poverty, but also keep it in perspective

December 25, 2010
Mike Hicks
There is a certain poignant irony in the U.S. Census Bureau’s release of 2010 poverty statistics this Christmas week. It reminds us that, behind the green eyeshades of professional data collectors, the folks at the Census Bureau have an acute marketing sense.
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HICKS: Inflation delays visit, but it'll arrive eventuallyRestricted Content

December 18, 2010
Mike Hicks
All economists know that, at its core, inflation is caused solely by too much money chasing too few goods.
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HICKS: Tax-cut proposal probably a good compromiseRestricted Content

December 11, 2010
Mike Hicks
The Bush tax cuts in particular are politically charged. Many people want to see the rich taxed at higher rates, with little regard for the impact on the economy.
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HICKS: The high costs of an over-lawyered societyRestricted Content

December 4, 2010
Mike Hicks
Estimates of the private-sector costs of civil litigation top out at about 2 percent of our gross domestic product, so for every $50 spent in the United States, $1 goes to support legal costs and settlements.
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HICKS: Thanksgiving, Black Friday and Cyber MondayRestricted Content

November 27, 2010
Mike Hicks
The holiday season in the United States has morphed into a time of concentrated purchases.
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HICKS: Discounting the future when making public policyRestricted Content

November 20, 2010
Mike Hicks
As you will learn in any good high school economics class, everyone values the future less than the present.
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HICKS: Educators must acknowledge need for reformRestricted Content

November 13, 2010
Mike Hicks
Fixing schools won’t be easy, but it begins with an honest realization of the problem—not mendacious malarkey.
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HICKS: Fed 'easing' into another stimulus planRestricted Content

November 6, 2010
Mike Hicks
Federal legislation dating from the Truman administration compels the Fed to try to achieve the lowest possible levels of unemployment and inflation. Unfortunately, minimizing both is not possible.
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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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