Arts notebook roundup: IRT adds kid's theater, new IAC events, and the end of the world

June 12, 2014
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—Indiana Repertory Theatre has long been a theater adept at attracting student groups. But now it’s aiming even younger by adding its first children’s productions to its lineup. In Nov. it launches its Exploring Stages series with “The Velveteen Rabbit” aimed at ages 3-8. A positive sign: The adaptation is by IRT playwright-in-residence James Still.

—For those who like to mark their calendars early, the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir has commissioned a new oratorio from composer Mohammed Fairouz to have its world premiere in Indy in April of 2015. With a libretto by actress/writer Najla Said, Fairouz’s “Oratorio on the Psalms of David” will be performed with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and will require a chorus, children’s choir and solists.

—The climactic volume of Ben H. Winters’ apocalyptic “The Last Policeman” series is set for a mid-July release from Quirk Books. My review of the Butler University faculty member’s latest will be posted around that time (I’m reading it now). In the meantime, catch up on the first two books, which I reviewed here.

—The Indianapolis Art Center has added a Collaborations series to its summer offerings, featuring pop-up ArtsPark performances and interactive story gatherings from NoExit Performance, Indy Reads Books, and Know No Stranger.

— “The Beverly Hillbillies: The Musical” will have its world premiere at Theatre at the Center in Munster. Historians may look back on this as the end of theater as we know it.

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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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