Marketers teach biz of school sports

April 23, 2008
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raycomptonThe looming property tax crisis has Indiana high schools fearful that athletic department budgets could be the focus of future fiscal cuts.

Ray Compton, one central Indiana’s most successful—and unconventional—sports marketers has a plan to help. Compton’s company, Compton Strategies, in partnership with several Indiana sports marketing professionals, have come together to offer the first Indiana High School Sports/Music Marketing and Sponsorship Seminar tomorrow at the Forum Conference Center in Fishers. Compton thinks music programs and school bands also have much to be concerned about.

Compton’s plan is to give high school officials the tools they need to market their programs to generate more of the revenue they need to continue—and rely less on unpredictable income from property taxes.

“Our goal is to use the experiences and insights that we have collected over the years to provide guidance, leadership and assistance to the high school industry,” said Compton, who formerly worked in marketing for the Indianapolis Colts, Indiana Pacers and Indianapolis Ice. “It is important to all of us that our state’s high schools continue to provide first-class activities in sports and music for their students. We believe there are ways that they can help solve some of the financial challenges that they may face in the immediate future. Our goal is to help uncover those avenues for them.”

Presenters include:
· Judy Shoemaker, National Federation of State High School Associations
· Bob Bernard, Strategic Marketing Alliance
· Larry Konfirst, Konfirst Consulting
· Frank Hancock, Sport Graphics
· Chris Kaufman, Indiana High School Athletic Association
· David Cranfill, Three-sixty Group
· Cal Kuphall, long-time college athletic administrator
· Vic Ruthig and Rita DeKlyen, Compton Strategies
· State Rep. Mike Murphy

Topics of presentations will range from turning games into fun events for fans and sponsors, developing Internet and email strategies to expand fundraising and sponsorships and exploring new methods to increase merchandise sales through licensing.

The seminar runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and tickets are $90.
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  • This seems like a solid idea. But the $90 seems a bit stiff. How are schools hurting for money supposed to be able to afford that.
  • It seems they should keep the cost down on this first year introductory offer until they can establish an ROI on this seminar. But it is a unique offering, so who knows, maybe the demand will be great.
  • This makes a lot of sense to me. This property tax situation has a lot of school programs in real trouble.

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  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

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