Rich flocking to real estate

November 30, 2009
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A Barclays survey shows people with more than $800,000 to invest are steering clear of stocks and bonds, and moving into real estate. Click here to see a story about the survey.

The wealthier the person, the more likely they are to prefer real estate, the British bank found. One reason is, they believe real estate, both residential and commercial, is a good investment given the depressed prices.

Aside from their home country, the respondents felt the United States held the greatest real estate opportunities.

What about the Indianapolis area? Would you rather have your money in local real estate or in stocks and bonds?

 

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  • I'll take bonds
    Indy real estate is likely to show a growth of less that 4% per year for the near future.
  • Lemmings.....
    And the "rich" are never wrong...
    TRUE - Real estate is considered more of a "tangible" investment because the investor can physically and visually assess the asset.
    FALSE - Real estate is a safer investment with more upside and less volatility than stocks/bonds.
    Despite what the NAR - National Association of Realtors (aka National Association of Racketeers) may suggest (without bias of course), real estate has not yet bottomed. If you disagree and see the Obama plan as inspiring economic growth & prosperity, then I am sure you will become a millionaire, assuming you are already a billionaire.
  • Recreation
    Stocks come and go (up and down), but a good piece of real estate cannot be recreated. Although it is a risk, keep in mind urban sprawl, urban renewal, and rural development. Just do not consider real estate a very liquid asset as it takes time to turn.
  • Pending
    All investments (housing, stocks, bonds, gold, etc) are all about timing. Reguardless if you are buying into one thing or another, it is an investment of sorts. For instance, If you decide to (right out of the gate), rent - you will get an easy pay in - no pay out (out side of instant living space). But if you buy a house, you will get a pay in - and pending on market and the investment along the way, pay out lower, higher, or even out from what your buy in market value.

    Granted, the house investments are much longer than your stocks/bonds investments, but all investments are risks, risks you will have to weigh yourself on. This is not a Democrat issue, not a Republican issue, but an issue of how YOU are investing YOUR money in whatever market you invest in. Just gotta act responsibly and wise when investing in the given market.

    Since I am new in the market, I am looking more towards a home than stocks or bonds right now. I can get more use out of a home. Granted, I will have alot more investment in my end, but I will have more (not complete, but) control of the investment output because of that.

    Tell me, Joe Schmoe, Do you own stocks/bonds or even a home? If so, when did you put yourself into that(those) investment(s)? Was it during the worst time in the market (at a high point)? I will agree that we haven't seen the bottom of the housing market yet, but no matter what, we will always need a place to live.
  • I'll take risk
    Predicting the bottom is worthless. RE Traders don't make $ by predicting the bottom, they make it by purchasing on a swing. Aiming for the bottom is obvious but buying just before the turnaround or on the way up is the goal. Same with selling, sell near the top, don't guess when you're there-otherwise, you could be the idiot with a bunch of property in the next downturn with nobody to occupy/buy it (see Duke). If that's too risky, I'll sell you a bond and give you back a bond + 1% in 5 years.
  • Land
    "Stocks may rise and fall, utilities and transportation systems may collapse, people are no damned good... but they will always need land, and they'll pay through the nose to get it."
    â??Lex Luthor

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  1. In reality, Lilly is maintaining profit by cutting costs such as Indiana/US citizen IT workers by a significant amount with their Tata Indian consulting connection, increasing Indian H1B's at Lillys Indiana locations significantly and offshoring to India high paying Indiana jobs to cut costs and increase profit at the expense of U.S. workers.

  2. I think perhaps there is legal precedence here in that the laws were intended for family farms, not pig processing plants on a huge scale. There has to be a way to squash this judges judgment and overrule her dumb judgement. Perhaps she should be required to live in one of those neighbors houses for a month next to the farm to see how she likes it. She is there to protect the people, not the corporations.

  3. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/engineer/facts/03-111.htm Corporate farms are not farms, they are indeed factories on a huge scale. The amount of waste and unhealthy smells are environmentally unsafe. If they want to do this, they should be forced to buy a boundary around their farm at a premium price to the homeowners and landowners that have to eat, sleep, and live in a cesspool of pig smells. Imagine living in a house that smells like a restroom all the time. Does the state really believe they should take the side of these corporate farms and not protect Indiana citizens. Perhaps justifiable they should force all the management of the farms to live on the farm itself and not live probably far away from there. Would be interesting to investigate the housing locations of those working at and managing the corporate farms.

  4. downtown in the same area as O'malia's. 350 E New York. Not sure that another one could survive. I agree a Target is needed d'town. Downtown Philly even had a 3 story Kmart for its downtown residents.

  5. Indy-area residents... most of you have no idea how AMAZING Aurelio's is. South of Chicago was a cool pizza place... but it pales in comparison to the heavenly thin crust Aurelio's pizza. Their deep dish is pretty good too. My waistline is expanding just thinking about this!

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