Light in the gloom

February 12, 2010
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Here’s a point of light in the economic haze. Indiana has more industrial project construction going on than any nearby state.

Industrial Info Resources, a Houston-area research firm, says the value of industrial construction underway in Indiana totals $8.5 billion, more than any surrounding state or Wisconsin can claim.

Industrial Info counts big projects as well as maintenance, which can be nickel-and-dime stuff of $1 million here, $3 million there. Nevertheless, when a state as small as Indiana has more activity than Illinois, Michigan or Ohio, it says something.

That top status won’t last long. Industrial Info shows Indiana launching only $3.4 billion in industrial construction this year, with much of the figure driven by wind farms. In 2011, the value of fledgling construction rises to $8.3 billion, but that will be only a fraction of projects scheduled to begin in some of the nearby states.

Industrial Info Resources, by the way, is pure in its definition of “industrial”—no warehouses. It tracks power generation, oil terminals and transmission, chemicals, alternative fuels, pharmaceuticals and biotech, paper, metals, foods and beverages, and industrial manufacturing.

Thoughts?

 

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  • Indiana Leads Great Lakes Region in Industrial Project Construction, But Could Drop in 2010
    Industrial Info is pleased to post the entire article on IBJ


    SUGAR LAND--February 12, 2010--Researched by Industrial Info Resources (Sugar Land, Texas)--Indiana has 52 industrial capital and maintenance projects totaling $8.5 billion currently under construction, making it the leading state in the six-state Great Lakes Region, which includes Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. Second on the list is Illinois with 55 projects totaling $8.2 billion.

    While spending is down significantly from previous years, Indiana remains the top state in the region for projects under construction. In 2008, for example, there was $11 billion worth of industrial projects under construction in the state. For additional information, see related October 17, 2008, news article - Indiana Leads Great Lakes States with $11 Billion of Industrial Project Construction.

    However, Indiana could lose its rank as the No. 1 state this year, as the value of planned construction starts for the state in 2010 is only $3.4 billion, substantially less than previous years. The $3.4 billion comes in the form of 146 projects scheduled to start construction this year.

    The largest project scheduled to begin construction this year in Indiana is a $380 million wind energy project near the town of Brookston. Horizon Wind Energy LLC (Bloomington, Illinois) is planning to start construction this spring on a third-phase expansion at the Meadow Lake windfarm to add 100 megawatts (MW) of wind turbines. Horizon Wind Energy currently operates 299 MW of wind capacity at Meadow Lake. Power generation projects account for about a third of the project value planned to begin construction in 2010. Alternative Fuels, Industrial Manufacturing and Metals & Minerals round out the majority of the remaining projects.

    Looking to future years, 78 projects totaling $8.3 billion are planned to begin construction in Indiana in 2011 and beyond. Indiana trails Illinois with 145 projects totaling $26.1 billion, Ohio with 101 project totaling $25.3 billion, and Michigan with 66 projects totaling $25 billion.

    For a comprehensive analysis of Great Lakes Project Spending check out Industrial Info's recently released Great Lakes 2010 Project Spending Wall Map. Use Promo Code GLPS2010INT for an introductory 10% discount.

    View Project Report - 11003381

    Industrial Info Resources (IIR) is the leading provider of global market intelligence specializing in the industrial process, heavy manufacturing and energy related markets. For more than 26 years, Industrial Info has provided plant and project spending opportunity databases, market forecasts, high resolution maps, and daily industry news.

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  1. $800M is a lot. There's over 800,000 people in the county/city though. I'm betting the cost of services(police, fire, roads, economic incentives to bring in new business, etc.) in Hamilton County is much more than $1000 per person. In 2012, the city of Carmel's audit report shows receipts of $268,742,988 (about 1/3 of Indianapolis's receipts) for a population of 83,573 (almost 1/10 the size of Indianapolis)...hmm, I wonder why Carmel is such a safer place to live...

  2. Would you let a mechanic diagnose your car over the internet without seeing it or taking it for a test drive? The patient needs face to face interaction with a physician to be properly diagnosed. It would seem to me that the internet diagnosis is about as silly as going to ones mirror and saying, "I wonder what I have"? And then you diagnose yourself. That's free and probably wrong too.

  3. Maybe if we treated the parents of juvie offenders who have 5 babies from 4 different daddies like stray cats and dogs who go around creating a bigger animal control problem, we wouldn't have so much of a "parenting" problem flooding both the social services and (later) correctional systems. The breakdown of morals and parental responsibilities from horndogs who can't keep it in their pants and keep their families together has caused this. If a pit bull attacks someone, it's destroyed. Everyone encourages that pets are spayed and neutered to control the pet population and prevent further issues. Maybe it's time to control the welfare population...

  4. Blocking two blocks of a street along Broadripple Ave. is not going to stop "pedestrians" from walking around. The article stated that seven people were injured as a result of a skirmish between two gun-toting "pedestrians"...not drive-bys. Most of the crimes that are committed in BR area are done by "pedestrians" that are walking in the area...not driving by. This may alleviate traffic going through the area and may steer some folks away from coming to the area because of the extra inconvenience but it will not stop a pedestrian, on foot from toting a gun while walking in that area....period.

  5. Please run for mayor Joe. We need someone to come in and clean house. They past two mayors have run administrations rampant with corruption. We need to clean house before corruption is accepted as normal like Chicago.

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