Developer reveals plans for $40M Westfield project

May 9, 2014
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A Westfield-based investment group is working on plans for a so-called “life wellness” development on land it’s buying from Westfield-Washington Schools.

Dubbed “The Junction” in a rezoning application, the mixed-use project at U.S. 31 and State Road 32 could include a medical office building, family entertainment center and hotel/meeting space in addition to some retail uses.

As IBJ reported last week, the school district has agreed to sell the 9.6-acre property—now home its football/track stadium and junior varsity baseball field—to Westfield Community Investors for $4 million. The group also has a $2 million option on an adjacent 4.5-acre parcel, which won’t be developed immediately.

Superintendent Mark Keen described The Junction as a $40 million development, but said it can’t get started until the school district builds a new football stadium. He asked the Westfield City Council for $2.5 million to accelerate construction, saying property taxes from the project will repay the city’s investment within three years.

City Council is expected to hold a public hearing on the funding request May 12. The panel also will get its first look at the developer’s conceptual plans for the site. (See renderings below.)

EdgeRock Development LLC is seeking to rezone the property as a planned unit development—establishing special rules and development standards. A project narrative included with the application said uses will include “medical, office, fitness, lodging, senior residential, restaurants and entertainment.”

A preliminary site plan shows six multistory buildings on the land west of Shamrock Boulevard. Another three are planned for the second phase east of Shamrock.

Westfield residents R. Birch Dalton and Randy Zentz are leading the project, which they say will complement the schools, the neighborhood and the city’s Grand Junction downtown redevelopment plan.

A two- to three-story medical office building likely will be the first puzzle piece to fall into place.

“There has been a tremendous amount of interest from a variety of medical services providers and investors,” EdgeRock said in a prepared statement, adding that a deal is imminent.

If the zoning change is approved, construction could begin next year—or whenever the athletic fields are relocated.

The Junction, conceptual rendering Conceptual rendering of view from raised intersection of U.S. 31 and State Road 32. (Click to enlarge.)

The Junction, conceptual renderingConceptual rendering of view from future roundabout at State Road 32 and Shamrock Boulevard. (Click to enlarge.)

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  • Westfield
    Info
  • Highway 31
    Didn't they shift the new highway 31 west to avoid the school event fields, resulting in the loss of all the businesses along the west side (Taco Bell, the hotel, etc)? But now they are selling off the fields? Maybe I'm wrong, but seems like a waste if that was the case.
  • Senior living portion
    Since Eric Turner represents Westfield, will his family business have anything to do with this?
  • Positive change
    US 31 is not moving, it is just growing, and the area for the new football field was planned before Major Moves and US 31 changes. The old field was great for a small school, and although sad to see it go, Westfield has outgrown that site, and the highest best use for that corner is not a football stadium any more.

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  1. A Tilted Kilt at a water park themed hotel? Who planned that one? I guess the Dad's need something to do while the kids are on the water slides.

  2. Don't come down on the fair for offering drinks. This is a craft and certainly one that belongs in agriculture due to ingredients. And for those worrying about how much you can drink. I'm sure it's more to do with liability than anything else. They don't want people suing for being over served. If you want a buzz, do a little pre-drinking before you go.

  3. I don't drink but go into this "controlled area" so my friend can drink. They have their 3 drink limit and then I give my friend my 3 drink limit. How is the fair going to control this very likely situation????

  4. I feel the conditions of the alcohol sales are a bit heavy handed, but you need to realize this is the first year in quite some time that beer & wine will be sold at the fair. They're starting off slowly to get a gauge on how it will perform this year - I would assume if everything goes fine that they relax some of the limits in the next year or couple of years. That said, I think requiring the consumption of alcohol to only occur in the beer tent is a bit much. That is going to be an awkward situation for those with minors - "Honey, I'm getting a beer... Ok, sure go ahead... Alright see you in just a min- half an hour."

  5. This might be an effort on the part of the State Fair Board to manage the risk until they get a better feel for it. However, the blanket notion that alcohol should not be served at "family oriented" events is perhaps an oversimplification. and not too realistic. For 15 years, I was a volunteer at the Indianapolis Air Show, which was as family oriented an event as it gets. We sold beer donated by Monarch Beverage Company and served by licensed and trained employees of United Package Liquors who were unpaid volunteers. And where did that money go? To central Indiana children's charities, including Riley Hospital for Children! It's all about managing the risk.

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