Prominent developer looking at Indy

June 15, 2007
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The founder of the country's largest black-owned real estate firm, R. Donahue Peebles, spoke at the PeeblesMadam C.J. Walker Theater earlier this week. His company, Peebles Corp., has $4 billion in projects currently in development in cities like Miami, New York, Chicago and Las Vegas. In a conversation after his talk, Peebles said he and other developers are looking to sink more money into "stable and consistent" markets like Indianapolis now that the frenetic pace in South Florida has slowed. He said he's considering a project in downtown Indianapolis but would not say where. What do you think: Is central Indiana "stable and consistent" enough to support all the ambitious new projects on the drawing board?
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  • I think it is in terms of population an in terms of commercial/retail. Industrial is another topic, but I don't forsee our population in Central Indiana Dwindling. There is a phlight of southerners near hurricane areas who are actually transferring some of their jobs and families to the midwest because insurance rates are cheaper, heck they can't even get insurance in some ares of florida! I say Mr. Peebles, welcome to Indy!
  • That's great news. I hope this materializes. Indy needs some new development blood to shake up the scene.
  • Central Indiana could definitely be described as stable and consistent. While there is still much room for improvement in terms of keeping economic pace with other major cities, i think the regional economic development officials have done really well at organizing and developing effective strategies to retain and lure jobs which has led to gains in regional population. I think it's great that Mr. Peebles recognizes this fact and is willing to invest in downtown Indianapolis. The Peebles Corporation has a interesting portfolio (http://www.peeblescorp.com/projects.html) and i look foward to seeing what the company has in mind for Indianapolis.
  • Central Indiana could definitely be described as stable and consistent. I'm happy Mr. Peebles recognizes this and is willing to invest money in the area.

    The Peebles Corporation project portfolio (http://www.peeblescorp.com/projects.html) also reflects and understanding of urban properties, which I definitely welcome for any projects proposed in downtown Indianapolis.
  • 150%...please bring the excitement of those great cities to the humble bread basket of Indianapolis!
  • Yes Yes Yes, please come and brind Indianapolis out of the age of mediocre and suburban downtown development.
  • They could build a majorly awesome development on Indiana Ave. near downtown? After all, it is has major African American influence & could use a nice shot in each arm... Just an idea! ;-)
  • eRiCh - fantastic idea. There is a lot of money in the African-American community around here, and I think a redevelopment in the Indiana Avenue corridor that reflects and honors the African-American heritage of this district would be both welcomed and supported.

    On the broader topic, the Indy metro had the fastest-growing census population between 1990 and 2005 among Midwestern cities. Granted, it was only like 3%, but we grew at a faster rate than Chicago, Cleveland, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Kansas City, and all the other Midwest metros. That in itself says a lot about the attractiveness of this area and the hard work of the economic development folks here.

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  1. With Pence running the ship good luck with a new government building on the site. He does everything on the cheap except unnecessary roads line a new beltway( like we need that). Things like state of the art office buildings and light rail will never be seen as an asset to these types. They don't get that these are the things that help a city prosper.

  2. Does the $100,000,000,000 include salaries for members of Congress?

  3. "But that doesn't change how the piece plays to most of the people who will see it." If it stands out so little during the day as you seem to suggest maybe most of the people who actually see it will be those present when it is dark enough to experience its full effects.

  4. That's the mentality of most retail marketers. In this case Leo was asked to build the brand. HHG then had a bad sales quarter and rather than stay the course, now want to go back to the schlock that Zimmerman provides (at a considerable cut in price.) And while HHG salesmen are, by far, the pushiest salesmen I have ever experienced, I believe they are NOT paid on commission. But that doesn't mean they aren't trained to be aggressive.

  5. The reason HHG's sales team hits you from the moment you walk through the door is the same reason car salesmen do the same thing: Commission. HHG's folks are paid by commission they and need to hit sales targets or get cut, while BB does not. The sales figures are aggressive, so turnover rate is high. Electronics are the largest commission earners along with non-needed warranties, service plans etc, known in the industry as 'cheese'. The wholesale base price is listed on the cryptic price tag in the string of numbers near the bar code. Know how to decipher it and you get things at cost, with little to no commission to the sales persons. Whether or not this is fair, is more of a moral question than a financial one.

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