Photo gallery: $155M CityWay taking shape

July 12, 2012
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The hotel, apartments and retail space at the $155 million CityWay are taking shape at Delaware and South streets. The first two photos show The Alexander hotel and the second two show some of the apartments with first-floor retail along Delaware Street. Click the images for larger versions. What do you think so far?

CityWay Indy

CityWay Indy

CityWay Indy

CityWay Indy

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  • City Way
    I think the development will be a great asset to the south side of Downtown and the Virginia Avenue Area. Just ate at Bluebeard on Virginia last night. If these are the kinds of development and restaurants in the future for this part of downtown, look out Mass Ave!
  • City Way
    I think the development will be a great asset to the south side of Downtown and the Virginia Avenue Area. Just ate at Bluebeard on Virginia last night. If these are the kinds of development and restaurants in the future for this part of downtown, look out Mass Ave!
  • CityWay Apts
    It's nice to see the continued revitalization of the downtown area. It looks fairly close the jail, is it? Also, it's nice there are balconies but the look awfully small and unuseable.
    • Very Nice
      Great progress
    • Not close to the jail
      Maybe you should take a drive down to see it. It sounds like are not familiar with downtown. It's a great place to live and work.
    • Not close to the jail
      Maybe you should take a drive down to see it. It sounds like are not familiar with downtown. It's a great place to live and work.
    • Another One
      This is yet another development that we the taxpayers are paying for that the private sector refused to fund because it was too risky. Why am I supposed to believe government is better at picking what a profitable project is than professional investors?
      • not just $
        Keep in mind that while a bank is only interested in profit, the city has other motives - revitalization of downtown, this project's effect on surrounding growth and development, increasing the tax base. These are things no bank considers for ROI purposes. The city was right to back the financing here.
        • Truth
          It's essentially 1.5 blocks from the jail, which is close. That doesn't mean it won't be successful. The Fieldhouse is less than a block from the jail, and that doesn't seem to hurt it. Tea Party Hater's comments are interesting, because defenders of the project will on one hand claim that the project will be successful and that the City won't lose any money on it, but when confronted with the question of whether the City knows better than private investors, who wouldn't fund the project, will say it doesn't matter that private investors thought it was a bad deal because there are bigger issues than whether the project can actually produce a return, i.e. pay off the City's bonds. I guess you can have it both ways.
        • Good Urban Infill
          Good, solid urban infill project. This will have a transformational impact in this area of downtown. I am ok with the City investing in smart, strategic projects that have the potential to act as a catalyst for future private investment. Indianapolis has to compete with the surrounding suburbs for people and jobs, therefore supporting projects that will encourage reinvestment and livability downtown is a good approach.
        • Progressive enough
          I agree with Tea Party Hater and Kevin. The city cannot continue to invest solely in huge corporations and parking lots: what else is there to know? It's a solid enough infill development to connect downtown with Virginia Avenue (Fletcher Place and Fountain Sq.). I'm wondering how many people in Indianapolis know which neighborhood they live in...or if they live in one? Just a thought.
        • Design too trendy
          I like the scope of the development, but the design is blah......this will look as outdated as the City/County building in no time.
          • easily dated
            I agree that the design is one that will be dated in no time. If it were traditional architecture, the project would be more likely to retain it's vaue
          • Cincinnati
            Would never be built in downtown Cincinnati. Looks like the JW Marriott...the 70's.
          • Design Comments
            What about this looks like the JW? There are plenty of places in town are red and brown brick and that smell of rich mahogany, if that's what you're into...
          • City Way
            As a downtown real estate agent, I feel that this project, along with others, will greatly improve the desirability of downtown living. It will attact more people, businesses and money!

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          1. I am so impressed that the smoking ban FAILED in Kokomo! I might just move to your Awesome city!

          2. way to much breweries being built in indianapolis. its going to be saturated market, if not already. when is enough, enough??

          3. This house is a reminder of Hamilton County history. Its position near the interstate is significant to remember what Hamilton County was before the SUPERBROKERs, Navients, commercial parks, sprawling vinyl villages, and acres of concrete retail showed up. What's truly Wasteful is not reusing a structure that could still be useful. History isn't confined to parks and books.

          4. To compare Connor Prairie or the Zoo to a random old house is a big ridiculous. If it were any where near the level of significance there wouldn't be a major funding gap. Put a big billboard on I-69 funded by the tourism board for people to come visit this old house, and I doubt there would be any takers, since other than age there is no significance whatsoever. Clearly the tax payers of Fishers don't have a significant interest in this project, so PLEASE DON'T USE OUR VALUABLE MONEY. Government money is finite and needs to be utilized for the most efficient and productive purposes. This is far from that.

          5. I only tried it 2x and didn't think much of it both times. With the new apts plus a couple other of new developments on Guilford, I am surprised it didn't get more business. Plus you have a couple of subdivisions across the street from it. I hope Upland can keep it going. Good beer and food plus a neat environment and outdoor seating.

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