$17M senior community planned for Solana project

March 27, 2013
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solana senior housing
                              rendering thumbnailCarmel-based Leo Brown Group plans to break ground early next month on a $17 million senior-living community south of Keystone at the Crossing. The project, dubbed Traditions at Solana, will be within the new Solana at the Crossing residential community under development by locally based Milhaus Development. Milhaus, which is developing The Artistry project downtown, bought the unfinished $150 million South Carolina-themed community in May. It’s developed 336 apartments in 16 new buildings and three that remain from the ill-fated condo project. About a third of the units are leased, said David Leazenby, Milhaus’ vice president of predevelopment services. Meanwhile, Traditions at Solana will include two-bedroom independent-living units as well as an assisted-living area and memory-care wing. The first residents are expected to move into the community in the fall. Traditions at Solana will be managed by an affiliate of Leo Brown Group, Traditions Management, which operates 162 senior-living units within Indiana. Architects for Solana at the Crossing are locally based firms AET Inc. and Odle McGuire Shook Inc.

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  • a couple of items
    First, I would be curious to see the actual occupancy rate of the apartments because the apt website and front office said they are almost sold out already. Second, I would like a contractor/construction person's perspective because I saw them throw up a lot of apt bldgs in what seemed to be a very short period of time. Potential quality issues among other things?
  • Whoa!
    Hope that's just a cut and paste rendering, otherwise hope DMD and Nora CC says not to it's ungliness!
  • Glad to see the Solana Complex completed BUT . . .
    I wonder how happy the other apartment building tenants will be when the ambulances are arriving on a more frequent basis and at all times of the day & night. Not sure how smart this is to add in assisted living into a more common apartment complex atmosphere. . . PS - Watch for another traffic light to be installed on Keystone soon.
    • No ambulances
      This is a independent living and assisted living community, NOT a nursing home. There will be barely any ambulances at all that go there.
      • ambulances
        You would be surprised how many ambulance runs there are to assisted living facilities. If a resident shows any physical distress whatsoever, they generally do not hesitate to call 911.

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      1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

      2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

      3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

      4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

      5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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