Roundup: Brewstone latest casualty at snakebitten Clearwater site

September 5, 2013
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Brewstone Beer Co. is the latest to fail at 3720 E. 82nd St., formerly occupied by the Music Mill concert venue. The restaurant and bar concept closed late last month less than two years after opening.

Cadillac Ranch Group, which also has a restaurant downtown, began renovating the building in mid-2011 but never opened. The Music Mill venue closed and reopened twice in 2009 under different owners. It closed for good in December 2010. The building once housed a Discovery Zone children's amusement center.

Starbucks has agreed to take 2,000 square feet at the west end of the new Nora Shops West retail center, a $2 million redevelopment of the 8,000-square-foot building that formerly housed Cafe Nora.

PK Partners 225pxA restaurant by Ryan Nelson, chef/owner of Late Harvest Kitchen at Keystone at the Crossing, will anchor the eastern portion. The concept will be a chef-driven barbecue restaurant with a menu featuring various geographic regions of barbecue and focusing on sustainably raised beef and pork, according to developer PK Partners.

Starbucks and the restaurant should be open in 2014. PK Partners says there may be room for one more tenant.

Studio Movie Grill is set to open by the end of the month at College Park Plaza near West 86th Street and Michigan Road. The Dallas-based cinema grill signed a 15-year lease with building owner Sandor Development Co. in May to occupy the theater building that once housed the AMC Loews College Park 14 movie theater, which closed in July 2009. It had been occupied the past two years by Movie Buff, an independent theater operated by a Chicago businessman.

Studio Movie Grill spent $4.6 million on renovations. When finished, the theater will sport 13 screens, 1,800 seats, a full bar and a menu featuring appetizers, salads, entrees and pizzas.

Torrid has filed plans to open two mall stores in Indianapolis, one at Circle Centre and another at Castleton Square, and will occupy about 3,000 square feet at each location.

Torrid, owned by California-based Hot Topic, offers plus-size clothing and accessories for women and teenage girls sizes 12-26. It operates more than 170 stores in 36 states.

Noble Roman’s Inc. has filed plans to open a Take-n-Bake store at 8183 E. U.S. 36 in Avon. Franchisees of the Indianapolis-based pizza chain already operate eight stand-alone, take-and-bake locations, including five in the Indianapolis area.

In 2010, the company started brokering deals to sell uncooked refrigerated pizzas in grocery stores and expanded the concept to mirror that of the industry-leading Papa Murphy’s chain.

Little Caesars Pizza has opened at 6241 E. Washington St., Suite B, in Irvington Plaza. It's the 11th restaurant for local franchisees Brian and Robin Jessogne.

• Several stores and restaurants are set to open this fall at the Hamilton Town Center lifestyle mall near Interstate 69 in Noblesville. They are children's clothing store Crazy 8, kids’ hair salon Cookie Cutters, hair-removal specialist Neel Thredz Spa, Far East gift shop Panda(ology), Tuscanos Brazilian Grill, vinegar-and-oil shop Vom Fass, and Yats Cajun Creole, the hometown restaurant with eight Indiana locations.
   
Subway is expected to open by November and Petro’s Chili and Chips by the end of the year at the Indianapolis International Airport’s new service plaza along the entrance road into the passenger terminal. The convenience store and 24-pump gas station are scheduled to open later this month.
 

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  • Brewstone
    Everybody quit going there because it was too busy.
  • Not surprised
    Nice Berra reference Yogi! I went with my family once to Brewstone and the service and food were so bad (especially the service), that I vowed to never go back. I'm not surprised they closed.
  • Za Pizza
    Za Pizza is closed in Broad Ripple. A place called Cook's is going in there.
  • Brewstone
    I agree with the previous comment about Brewstone. I am shocked they were open for so long. Absolutely terrible service, mediocre beer selection and bland, overpriced food. Good Riddance!
  • No Surpise
    Brewstone closed? Really not surprised. I also ate there once with my family. The menu was mediocre, the food quality was poor, and the service was even worse. We vowed never to go back and I suggested it would close in a year. I was half-right. It took more than a year.
  • If only...
    The concept of Brewstone was fantastic. Loved the outdoor patio and the whole setup. If someone went in there who actually knew how to run a restaurant and wasn't so focused on the "party" and the adjacent lounge, and focused on beer selection, food and service, they would do well there. FWIW, I had also heard there was a bit of trouble with the excise police. That may have contributed to its untimely demise.
  • Agree with Fishers Gal
    I too liked the concept at Brewstone. I actually went several times but went hoping some of the complaints others listed had been improved. The place had potential. The outdoor patio was a great space to hang out and relax. Beyond the sub-par customer service I thought the place was over priced in both food and beer. I still wish the Music Mill was there. That was a great spot to hear bands. The north side could use a venue as that.
  • Popeye's in Carmel
    By the way, I hear that the Popeye's in Carmel is now open. Has anyone tried it yet? Excited to have the best fried chicken chain closer than 86th Street.
    • Brewstone
      I gave Brewstone three opportunities: and, they failed each time. The food was simply bad, and the service was really slow and inattentive. Too bad, as the building was designed and built really well and had a fantastic outdoor patio space.

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    1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

    2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

    3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

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    5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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