Public sale to rid Wishard property of remaining items

January 8, 2014
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Wishard Memorial Hospital has been closed for about a month, but thousands of non-medical items still remain on the Wishard campus.

wishard closed 225pxTo rid the buildings of the surplus, a massive public sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 11-12. Among the items available: furniture, office chairs, desks, recliners, file cabinets, artwork, flat-screen televisions, computers, laser printers, microwaves and refrigerators.

Only cash will be accepted, and items must be hauled away at the time of purchase.

Entry to the sale is through the main entrance of Wishard on Wishard Boulevard. Parking is available in any of the nearby parking garages.

Not-for-profits will have a chance to take anything that is left free of charge. They must pre-register by calling 880-4789 and will need to show proof of 501(c)(3) status upon arrival.

Wishard’s 17 buildings need to be cleaned before Indiana University can acquire the land near the IUPUI campus as part of a swap with the city that cleared the way for the $754 million Eskenazi Health just to the west.

As IBJ reported Jan. 6, the university wants to expand its health services program by using some existing Wishard space and tearing down other buildings and replacing them with modern facilities.

Chicago-based Centurion Service Group LLC is conducting the sale. Any money left after paying Centurion will go in Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County’s general fund. The corporation operated Wishard and now runs Eskenazi Health.
 

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  • Why not
    Any money left after paying Centurion will go in Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County’s general fund. If there is not going to create much money except to pay the company conducting the sale why not let local not for profits come in and get the stuff for their offices or let orgs like St. Vincent have the stuff to distribute to the poor--it just seems this would be a better use of the assets to help the community that paid for them in the first place.
    • Reply to Bob
      Because this is considered "public property," there are laws governing the disposal of it. They can't just give the stuff away as you propose.
    • List available?
      Would like to know if there is a list or link to the items for sale.
    • Reply to Bob
      They will be giving items away to non-profits on Jan. 13. It says to call 880-4789 to register for non-profit day. You can read about it on the Eskenazi Health website eskenazihealth.edu.
    • Full Story IBJ
      The best part of this story is that they ARE giving items away to non-profits. IBJ had to work to exclude this detail, it's included on every other news outlet, and on the event's site itself. Odd way to craft a message
    • not for profits
      No-for-profit information has been added. Thanks for pointing it out.
    • Please put the blade down on the actual road surface
      Chicago-based Centurion Service Group LLC. Dallas-based ACS. Always another city. Always undisclosed terms.
    • New teacher in IPS
      I am a new teacher working for IPS. Can I or my administrator claim ourselves as a not-for-profit in order to get some much needed furniture or other things for our school?

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    1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

    2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

    3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

    4. If you only knew....

    5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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