Efforts target blight on 16th

October 13, 2009
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The Indianapolis Housing Agency has bought a troubled low-income housing project called Caravelle Commons and is working on plans to redevelop the complex to better connect with the Herron Morton Place neighborhood. Next door, Kroger has revived efforts to acquire land and plan a new supermarket at 16th and Central Avenue to replace an old location. The chain bought the corner a few years ago and closed on a vacant parcel that was previously part of Caravelle earlier this year. Together, the developments could represent a turning point for a blighted stretch of 16th Street. At a minimum, the housing agency plans to reopen Park Avenue, which now dead-ends in the complex, and take down fences that surround the apartment buildings. But there’s a “good chance” the plans will involve demolition of the existing complex, at 1643 N. Park Ave., and the construction of a more urban-looking replacement, said Bruce Baird, the group’s director of strategic planning and development. Check out the full story here. (You can sign up for a free 12-week subscription to IBJ.com.)

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  • That's the best news I have heard in a very long time. I vote for the total demolition!
  • Still not enough justification for charging $250,000 for condos in that area. But I guess that's how gentrification works.
  • If this is real and not the hype we heard three years ago, then it will be the best thing to happen to the Near North Side of Indianapolis in decades. A couple good schools later and we can be back to one of the most desired neighborhoods around.
  • This is LONG over due.

    In other grocery news...the Omailia's at 56th & Emerson/Kessler is CLOWING. Sad day. That's my 'hood and it will be missed
  • Great news for such a LONG OVER DUE re-development. I think the corner of 16th and College is probably the most crime ridden, under-utilized, and disconnected spaces in all of of downtown. Low density development should be banned from the city core. This will only benefit EVERYBODY...FINALLY!!
  • If you want good neighborhood schools, you might check out the neighboring IPS schools. For instance, School 56 has higher test scores than the Indiana Average. Most of their scores are in the 93 percentile, http://www.education.com/schoolfinder/us/indiana/indianapolis/francis-w-parker-school-56/test-results/.

    Also, check out the other IPS schools. There are many, many great programs within the system that rarely get mentioned and places like the Near-North side should celebrate the excellent schools.
  • Great News
    I live at the corner of 16th and College and think that this is great news. The Community Spirits liqour store has somewhat cleaned up, now if we could get the SW corner building that is half demolished cleaned up, we'd be in good shape!
  • Finally!!!
    It's about time that blight be removed from our community. And a modern grocery store in the neighborhood would be awesome.
  • Hurry the hell up please
    I grew up in those apartments, and they been talking about rebuilding for years. Personally i'm tired of hearing about it be like NIKE and just do it. And you know what, it's sad when you want your old neighborhood torn down.I've had too many childhood friends die in or around that neighborhood.CRIME is everywhere nowdays but down there it is extremly excessive.I heard it used to be a graveyard or something like that is it true?

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  1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

  2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

  3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  4. If you only knew....

  5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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