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INDIANAPOLIS BUSINESS JOURNAL

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DECEMBER 5-11, 2016

Are the state’s workforce development programs a muddled, bureaucratic mess in need of reform? Indiana House Speaker Brian Bosma thinks so, and he’s made streamlining the vital but wasteful system a top priority this session, Hayleigh Colombo reports. Also in this week’s issue, Greg Andrews recounts the scene at Eli Lilly and Co. just before Thanksgiving when employees learned that a highly anticipated Alzheimer’s drug had failed its final stage trial—and details Lilly’s next offensive against the disease. And in A&E Etc., Lou harry reviews the Asian-inspired cuisine at Longbranch.

Front Page

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Top Stories

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Focus

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A&E, etc.

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Opinion

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FIDDIAN-GREEN: Vaping is not a proven way to stop smoking

A serious dialogue about curbing smoking in the Hoosier state should start with the most promising solutions. And as rigorous research studies and other states’ experiences have shown, there are far more powerful tools than e-cigarettes at our disposal.
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LETTER: Unions would force pay up

If the hospitality and convention industry workforce were allowed to unionize and negotiate for a decent standard of living, then we would most certainly see poverty rates decrease.
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LETTER: Protect auto dealers

Without a reliable network spread out across the state and around the country, auto manufacturers can't adequately serve customers.
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In Brief

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Special Sections

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2016 CFO of the Year: Anthony Gioia

Anthony Gioia has guided OrthoIndy through a minefield of industry and regulatory changes, has been instrumental in the opening of urgent care clinics, and managed the group’s relationship with St. Vincent.
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2016 CFO of the Year: Mark Denien

Heading a team of more than 120 associates, Mark Denien has raised $2.1 billion in new capital in the last 18 months while retiring $830 million in bonds and leading a reduction in debt of more than $1.4 billion.
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2016 CFO of the Year: Susan Hardwick

The company’s first female executive, Susan Hardwick is a pioneer in a male-dominated business an she has been instrumental in recognizing and developing female and minority talent within the company.
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2016 CFO of the Year: Madonna Wagner

In each of her seven years at the zoo, Madonna Wagner has guided the institution to an operating profit, balancing the ambitions of the global conservation organization with the practical needs of a facility that hosts 1.2 million visitors annually.
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2016 CFO of the Year: Kyle Wenger

Kyle Wenger oversees all financial aspects of one of the nation’s leading living-history attractions—and one of Indiana’s top tourism draws—including its $12 million annual operating budget and a public foundation that oversees a $90 million endowment.
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2016 CFO of the Year: Robert B. Thomson

Thomson negotiated new usage agreements with airlines, put in place a new public safety officer retirement plan and developed a debt management program that has generated more than $50 million in savings since 2013.
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2016 CFO of the Year: Cheryl Harmon

Cheryl Harmon has been credited with helping build the culture and vision of St. Vincent, including forging new partnerships, improving revenue capture, and establishing a greater focus on growth and efficiency.
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2016 CFO of the Year: Joe Kessler

Joe Kessler has been credited with advanced funding of the employee pension plan, reducing interest costs and simplifying Community’s debt structure, and redesigning the East campus reinvestment plan.
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Records

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