IBJNews

Rose-Hulman takes pride in top college ranking

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Rose-Hulman's No. 1 ranking in U.S. News and World Report — again — is a source of pride for Adam Janeira, a junior majoring in mechanical engineering.

"It's one of the reasons why people come here," said Janeira, who is from Newburgh. "It's such a great inspiration to know the school you are going to is achieving so much . and you're getting a top-notch education."

For the 14th year in a row, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology has been ranked the nation's top undergraduate engineering college in the U.S. News & World Report 2013 college guidebook, the Tribune-Star reported.

The school in Terre Haute, about 75 miles west of Indianapolis, is first among colleges that offer the bachelor's or master's degree as their top degrees in engineering.

Greg Bollivar, a freshman from Normal, Ill., said he first learned about Rose-Hulman a few years ago from a cousin who attended the college and gave him a shirt proclaiming its No. 1 ranking.

His brother also attends Rose. "I guess as a family we realize that it's a really good school," he said Wednesday, the day the 2013 rankings became public. The ranking reinforces what he already knows — that he's getting a really good education that will ultimately lead to a really good job.

Interim president Robert Coons says the college focuses on providing a quality undergraduate education for its 1,900 or so students, not a ranking.

But there are many benefits to that No. 1 ranking. "It puts us on the map globally" and brings students from as far away as China and Japan, Coons said.

The ranking instills a sense of pride among Rose alumni, he said. As of 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, he had received 30 emails from alumni "thrilled" about the continuing record of success.

Coons also believes the continued No. 1 ranking provides continuity in a year of transition as far as college leadership. "I think it helps reassure the community that the institution is solid, stable and moving forward," he said.

He's also been made aware the ranking serves as a good promotional tool for Terre Haute.

Next week, Coons will present to the Rose-Hulman board of trustees a five-year strategic plan that outlines how it will maintain and improve upon its record of academic and teaching excellence.

Andy Zehnder, a 1998 Rose-Hulman alumnus, was on campus Wednesday as part of a General Electric networking event. He is an engineering manager at GE Aviation in Cincinnati and regularly visits Rose-Hulman to recruit students.

The ranking "speaks volumes," he said. The ranking "is something that really helps me prove to my company that this is a place we need to go and get more and more engineers."

Engineers from Rose-Hulman "are by and far the best," Zehnder said, perhaps showing a little bit of bias.

Phil Cornwell, Rose-Hulman's vice president for academic affairs, taught at the college 22 years before stepping up to administration.

He came to Rose because its focus was on teaching and undergraduate education — and that's where the focus remains.

He believes that's the key to its consistent No. 1 ranking.

Some schools say teaching is important, but the reward system for faculty is based more on research and how much money they bring in, he said.

"Here, the reward system is really how good of an educator you are," Cornwell said. "We want you to stay intellectually growing and we want you to be experts in your field, but ultimately, are you a good educator?"

He frequently tells faculty that one of the primary measures of success is the success of students. "That's why we're here," he said.

The focus will remain on educating students, not on obtaining a ranking, he said.

Among faculty, "There is a certain amount of skepticism as far as what does it actually mean. We all like it. We all think it's wonderful. But ultimately, we're doing what we're doing because we believe we're helping students be successful."

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Where do they really rank?
    Being first among colleges that "offer the bachelor's or master's degree as their top degrees in engineering" is a great acheivement, and their focus on teaching is an obvious plus, but it would be nice to know where they rank among all schools. I have friends from Penn, Purdue and Rose, all of whom have great jobs/carrers, and there is a good humored argument as to which is the best. Personally, I think they are all excellent, and it varies among engineering specialties and with the individual's personality.

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. Really, taking someone managing the regulation of Alcohol and making himthe President of an IVY Tech regional campus. Does he have an education background?

  2. Jan, great rant. Now how about you review the report and offer rebuttal of the memo. This might be more conducive to civil discourse than a wild rant with no supporting facts. Perhaps some links to support your assertions would be helpful

  3. I've lived in Indianapolis my whole and been to the track 3 times. Once for a Brickyard, once last year on a practice day for Indy 500, and once when I was a high school student to pick up trash for community service. In the past 11 years, I would say while the IMS is a great venue, there are some upgrades that would show that it's changing with the times, just like the city is. First, take out the bleachers and put in individual seats. Kentucky Motor Speedway has individual seats and they look cool. Fix up the restrooms. Add wi-fi. Like others have suggested, look at bringing in concerts leading up to events. Don't just stick with the country music genre. Pop music would work well too I believe. This will attract more young celebrities to the Indy 500 like the kind that go to the Kentucky Derby. Work with Indy Go to increase the frequency of the bus route to the track during high end events. That way people have other options than worrying about where to park and paying for parking. Then after all of this, look at getting night lights. I think the aforementioned strategies are more necessary than night racing at this point in time.

  4. Talking about congestion ANYWHERE in Indianapolis is absolutely laughable. Sure you may have to wait in 5 minutes of traffic to travel down BR avenue during *peak* times. But that is absolutely nothing compared to actual big cities. Indy is way too suburban to have actual congestion problems. So please, never bring up "congestion" as an excuse to avoid development in Indianapolis. If anything, we could use a little more.

  5. Oh wait. Never mind.

ADVERTISEMENT