SAT scores stuck below average

August 26, 2008
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This yearâ??s SAT scores are out, and there isnâ??t much to cheer about. Indiana saw math scores improve slightly, but reading and writing scores dropped a few points. All three remain below national averages.

Educators say the tests are harder. And more students are taking them, suggesting lower-caliber students are dragging down the scores.

How do you see it? Do a higher number of test takers in Indiana excuse the below-average scores? Are SAT scores overrated as a measure of student progress?
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  • Individuals can point to a lot of reasons for underperforming students, like too many students taking the SAT. The facts seem pretty clear. Students in Indiana are underperforming. Perhaps it is time to look at the job of teacher preparation being done by Indiana's colleges and universities, and the job these same institutions are doing in providing meaningful continuing education to teachers. Improvements in those two areas might go a very long way toward better student achievement. Isn't it logical that colleges and universities should be evaluated on their performance in the effort to prepare teachers, just as public school teachers are evaluated based upon the achievement of their students?
  • I think it might be a good idea for universities to do psychological assessments of college students entering school of education. I'm not saying a lot of teachers are nuts, only that many people are not cut out to be teachers.
  • The higher percentage of students taking the test could well skew the results for Indiana, but I have yet to see us compare out scores to other states with similar percentages of their students taking the test. That would be a good measure; is it being ignored because it is worse, or not available?

    The real issue is the hideous graduation rate in many Indiana school systems, particularly IPS. How can we expect to do well in attracting desirable employers with such ridiculous educational success? How many times do we have to say The days of high income for high school drop outs are gone. before some of these people get it?

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