ABC's Jeff Van Gundy gives MSA nod of appreciation

June 13, 2012
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Market Square Arena got an unexpected nod of appreciation during Tuesday’s national broadcast of the NBA Finals on ABC.

During the opening moments of the game featuring the Miami Heat and Oklahoma City Thunder, commentator Jeff Van Gundy mentioned how loud it was inside the Thunder’s home arena. He said it’s currently the loudest NBA arena.

“This is the loudest building since the old Chicago Stadium and the old Market Square Arena in Indianapolis,” Van Gundy said. “It’s not even close anymore in the NBA.”

Van Gundy knows a thing or two about MSA, which was razed in 2001 after Bankers Life Fieldhouse opened. Van Gundy coached the New York Knicks from 1995-2002, and faced off against the Indiana Pacers in several epic playoff showdowns.

You could tell from his remarks, Van Gundy has a special affinity for MSA, though the crowd noise likely worked to his detriment during his coaching days. There was a real “they don’t make ‘em like that anymore” tone to Van Gundy’s comment about Chicago Stadium—the long-time home of the NHL’s Blackhawks and NBA’s Bulls—which was closed in 1994, and MSA.

So why was MSA so loud and so much louder than Bankers Life Fieldhouse?

You could debate this all day. And longer. In fact, many Pacers fans have.

There are several obvious reasons why MSA crowd noise was louder than that at the Fieldhouse. There were more hard surfaces that reverberated sound in Market Square Arena than in the Fieldhouse and other modern arenas.

There was no ring of suites in MSA’s mid-section. That has several impacts. The suites mean screaming fans aren’t so tightly bunched together in the mid-section of the Fieldhouse. Pulling people into the suites and out of the arena’s bowl means there are fewer fans that can be heard making noise. It’s difficult to hear people screaming and pounding their feet from inside a luxury suite. In addition, many people sitting in a suite aren’t the most likely candidates to be jumping up and down and screaming.

That brings us to another key factor for why MSA was louder for Pacers games than the Fieldhouse. Quite simply, the demographics changed when the Pacers moved to its more up-scale home. The Fieldhouse’s suites, club seats and other amenities attracted a more reserved, corporate crowd and fewer over-the-top screaming fans.

Since the day it opened as Conseco Fieldhouse in 1999 and even today as Bankers Life Fieldhouse, the Pacers’ home venue has been revered as one of the finest basketball arenas not only in the NBA, but in the world. It has superior sight lines, comfortable seats and awesome concourses, concession stands and restroom facilities. Its old-time touches add a charm that few arenas today can match.

But, it is no longer among NBA’s loudest venues. And no matter how much winning the Pacers do, it’s doubtful it will ever be as loud as the echoes—real or imagined—of Market Square.  
 

ADVERTISEMENT
  • MSA vs. BLF
    Sight lines for most seats in Bankers Life are good, but there are bad seats in there. It can truthfully be said that in MSA there was not a single bad seat in the house. Some were closer than others, but with the absence of those two rings of suites, the furthest seats away were much closer than those in Bankers Life. And, most importantly, everyone in MSA sat together. It was one big crowd, not a lot of separated groups as it is now.
  • Loud Crowd
    I was watching the telecast and was pleasantly surprised when MSA was mentioned.
    Like Anthony says, you could debate why all day. I think it merely is the bowl effect of MSA versus the fieldhouse design of the roof. Sounds bounce off the roof and back to the middle of MSA.

    I do think BLF can get a lot louder. First, it will take a playoff atmosphere, then second we have to be sure there are 17000 Pacer fans there and not Bulls or Heat fans!
  • fans
    Fans make the noise it took years for pacers to play outstanding ball back under larry brown pacer fans loved how pacers played I was there in 94 when Pacers beat hawks to advance to ECF fans crying during that time Pacers gave fans what fans hope to see and when it happen emotions made extremely loud fans my friends next to me we coulddnt hear each other talk
  • MSA
    I missed this comment but he said that MSA was one of the loudest he had ever been in while doing a game in a previous series. The fact that he has now gone out of his way to say something about MSA being one of the loudest more than once says a lot...
  • MSA
    MSA was loud and fun. It was also one of the more picturesque arenas - great location and great vistas especially west to the circle and the Statehouse in the distance. But BLF was/is necessary.

Post a comment to this blog

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
  1. I took Bruce's comments to highlight a glaring issue when it comes to a state's image, and therefore its overall branding. An example is Michigan vs. Indiana. Michigan has done an excellent job of following through on its branding strategy around "Pure Michigan", even down to the detail of the rest stops. Since a state's branding is often targeted to visitors, it makes sense that rest stops, being that point of first impression, should be significant. It is clear that Indiana doesn't care as much about the impression it gives visitors even though our branding as the Crossroads of America does place importance on travel. Bruce's point is quite logical and accurate.

  2. I appreciated the article. I guess I have become so accustomed to making my "pit stops" at places where I can ALSO get gasoline and something hot to eat, that I hardly even notice public rest stops anymore. That said, I do concur with the rationale that our rest stops (if we are to have them at all) can and should be both fiscally-responsible AND designed to make a positive impression about our state.

  3. I don't know about the rest of you but I only stop at these places for one reason, and it's not to picnic. I move trucks for dealers and have been to rest areas in most all 48 lower states. Some of ours need upgrading no doubt. Many states rest areas are much worse than ours. In the rest area on I-70 just past Richmond truckers have to hike about a quarter of a mile. When I stop I;m generally in a bit of a hurry. Convenience,not beauty, is a primary concern.

  4. Community Hospital is the only system to not have layoffs? That is not true. Because I was one of the people who was laid off from East. And all of the LPN's have been laid off. Just because their layoffs were not announced or done all together does not mean people did not lose their jobs. They cherry-picked people from departments one by one. But you add them all up and it's several hundred. And East has had a dramatic drop I in patient beds from 800 to around 125. I know because I worked there for 30 years.

  5. I have obtained my 6 gallon badge for my donation of A Positive blood. I'm sorry to hear that my donation was nothing but a profit center for the Indiana Blood Center.

ADVERTISEMENT