Stadium size, hotel space to be issue in Indy's bid to host 2018 Super Bowl

July 19, 2012
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If you’re a savvy politician—and 2012 Super Bowl Host Committee Chairman Mark Miles is nothing if not a savvy political player—you’re always counting votes.

Politicians don’t make a move unless they have reasonable belief that they have the votes. Not just the votes to get elected, but the votes within a political body to get things done. Politicians ranging from small town mayors to presidents are constantly counting votes.

So I’m sure Miles and other Indianapolis leaders think they have a reasonable chance to obtain the votes to secure the 2018 Super Bowl. Because as good as Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard looked at Wednesday’s press conference, a failure two years from now to get Indianapolis’ second Super Bowl will hang on the incumbent Republican mayor as the next election approaches.

The problem is, the NFL owners club is a political body different from any other. And savvy or not, Miles, Ballard and other city and state leaders simply don’t have the kind of access to this group as a mayor would have to his city council or a president would have to Congress.

And even if they did have that kind of access, it’s difficult to gauge the whimsy of this group of 32 multi-multi-millionaires.

In terms of winning the bid for the 2018 Super Bowl, WXIN’s Russ McQuaid asked the most important question at Wednesday’s press conference. Amid all the glee expressed over the millions raked in by the city and its businesses, McQuaid asked: “Are NFL owners happy with the money they got from the Super Bowl?”

The answer was the expected—but purely anecdotal. The real answer is, “We just don’t know.” We do know this: Lucas Oil Stadium is impossibly small when it comes to competing with stadiums incities like New York, New Orleans and Dallas. Those cities can easily offer the NFL and its owners $10 million more in revenue than Indianapolis ever can. If deep-pocketed owners like Dallas Cowboys’ Jerry Jones let their egos get involved, Dallas can probably outbid Indianapolis by close to double that.

As generous as the Indianapolis corporate community was in ponying up funds to help host the 2012 Super Bowl, asking them to throw in another eight-figure amount is crazy.

“I don’t think the size of the stadium strictly limits us,” Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay told IBJ Wednesday, noting Lucas Oil Stadium could be expanded to seat as many as 72,000.

But 72,000 would be 9,000 more than normally fit inside LOS for a Colts game. That’s close to a 15-percent increase, and while stadium officials might be able to seat that many in LOS, the stadium’s concession stands and restrooms could be overrun like they were in Dallas during the 2011 Super Bowl, when Cowboys Stadium was expanded nearly 20 percent to 100,000.

Officials for Dallas-based HOK, which designed LOS and Cowboys Stadium, told IBJ that Lucas Oil Stadium could be expanded “comfortably” to 68,000. The NFL wasn’t even comfortable with that this year, opting to put just a few hundred more people inside LOS than would normally be on hand for a Colts game.

The money issues are why people like Miles and 2012 Super Bowl Host Committee CEO Allison Melangton are already pondering alternative ways to raise money for the NFL. The Super Bowl Village—more popular for the 2012 Super Bowl than event organizers dared to imagine—is being looked at for revenue generation opportunities.

Money generation isn't the only issue when it comes to stadium size.

"It's as much about the NFL's ticket commitment, the number of tickets the league has committed to sponsors, its broadcast partners to players as part of the collective bargaining agreement, coaches and a number of other parties," said Marc Ganis, president of Chicago-based SportsCorp Ltd., which counts several NFL teams as clients. "And that number of committed tickets is going up every year. When you get into a stadium size below 75,000, it gets very, very difficult to host a Super Bowl."

There’s one other major issue Indianapolis must wrestle with to score another Super Bowl.

Many locals want to know why Indianapolis isn’t trying to go after an earlier Super Bowl. First, there is already a long line of cities vying for the 50th Super Bowl in 2016. That’s a no-win battle for Indianapolis. But there may be another important reason why Indianapolis is waiting until 2018.

That gives developers another year or two to build another large downtown hotel. The most likely site is the Pan Am Plaza. Several high-up team and league officials complained that there weren’t enough downtown hotel rooms for this year’s Super Bowl. The league’s big-dollar sponsors and promotional partners were not pleased with being forced to camp out in central Indiana suburbs.

“Another downtown hotel would definitely be a big plus,” Irsay said. “But a lot of that discussion is just constructive criticism.”

And just any new hotel wouldn't do.

"It would have to be a big four- or five-star hotel," Ganis said. "Anything below a four-star hotel would be irrelevant in satisfying the league and its partners."

Despite its success in hosting various national and international sporting events and being a darling of the NCAA Final Four, Indianapolis figures to need all the big pluses it can get to land another Super Bowl and the $150 million plus economic impact it brings with it. 

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  • While I agree with much of what you wrote, I have two disagreements. First, I don't think a failed bid, as long as it was well done, would reflect badly on anyone in Indy. I think everyone going in knows Indy, and any cold climate city, is facing an uphill battle. To bid against the likes of Miami, NOLA, Phoenix and whatever stadiums end up on the west coast is a difficult battle....we know that. To have the guts to try it a second time will show our resolve and belief. I am guessing Indy will be the only cold weather city that would have a chance. To try and fail is not bad. To fail because you never tried is. Second, I don't think the NFL will have an issue with letting a place like Indy get in the rotation every decade or so. While we do have negatives, we have a lot of positives. The first being we raise the bar every time we host an event. The Superbowl was the same old same old until we hosted it. Now the traditional cities will have to raise the bar as well. I feel bad for NOLA. Not a great Superbowl city anyway, they now have to follow us. The NFL may decide it is all about the money, but if they do, it will give them a black eye since so many fans and media praised the success in Indy. Finally, the hotel will happen. It may not be in 2018, but there has always been discussion of the need for another 600+ high end hotel. It will take a few years for downtown to digest the JW, but already the conventions are lining up to raise the occupancy rates for all of the downtown hotels.
  • Side money
    With HUGE amount of tv and other side money coming in to the NFL for the superbowl, it's hard to believe the number of seats available for the game would make that much difference.
  • Failure not related to cold
    Indyman, this post points out that the reason Indianapolis will fail to win another Super Bowl has nothing to do with cold weather. It's because city and state officials built a stadium too small to handle the big game. And secondly, because our major league city isn't yet major league enough for NFL owners and sponsors in terms of tier-1 downtown hotel rooms. And Rick, as Marc Ganis points out it's not just about the money ticket revenue raises. It's about accommodating big-money sponsors and contractual commitments through their broadcast deals and the collective bargaining agreement. The bottom line is weather will have nothing to do with Indy not getting another Super Bowl. It simply doesn't have the infrastructure the NFL will be demanding going forward. The NFL loves our ideas, and thank you very much, they'll be taking them with them as they go off in search of greener pastures.
  • Failure not related to cold
    Indyman, this post points out that the reason Indianapolis will fail to win another Super Bowl has nothing to do with cold weather. It's because city and state officials built a stadium too small to handle the big game. And secondly, because our major league city isn't yet major league enough for NFL owners and sponsors in terms of tier-1 downtown hotel rooms. And Rick, as Marc Ganis points out it's not just about the money ticket revenue raises. It's about accommodating big-money sponsors and contractual commitments through their broadcast deals and the collective bargaining agreement. The bottom line is weather will have nothing to do with Indy not getting another Super Bowl. It simply doesn't have the infrastructure the NFL will be demanding going forward. The NFL loves our ideas, and thank you very much, they'll be taking them with them as they go off in search of greener pastures.
  • Let's Audit the Impact Claims
    When the author claims that the Super Bowl had a $150 million impact, it neglects to state whether that impact was positive or negative. If this number is claimed as positive, the author of a business newspaper should really demand to see an audited non-disclaimed statement proving this figure.
  • Let's Audit the Impact Claims
    When the author claims that the Super Bowl had a $150 million impact, it neglects to state whether that impact was positive or negative. If this number is claimed as positive, the author of a business newspaper should really demand to see an audited non-disclaimed statement proving this figure.
  • Let's Audit the Impact Claims
    When the author claims that the Super Bowl had a $150 million impact, it neglects to state whether that impact was positive or negative. If this number is claimed as positive, the author of a business newspaper should really demand to see an audited non-disclaimed statement proving this figure.
  • Money
    Please put the money into education.That will drive our standard of living up and benefit more people than any sports facility or sports event.
  • Hmmm...
    How does Marc Ganis know what the owners want? Jim Irsay is on the Super Bowl Committee for the NFL---I think if the owners felt our stadium was too small or our hotel situation disqualified us, Irsay would know and would not have been at the press conference!!

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  1. I had read earlier this spring that Noodles & Co was going to open in the Fishers Marketplace (which is SR 37 and 131st St, not 141st St, just FYI). Any word on that? Also, do you happen to know what is being built in Carmel at Pennsylvania and Old Meridian? May just be an office building but I'm not sure.

  2. I'm sorry, but you are flat out wrong. There are few tracks in the world with the history of IMS and probably NO OTHER as widely known and recognized. I don't care what you think about the stat of Indy Car racing, these are pretty hard things to dispute.

  3. Also wondering if there is an update on the Brockway Pub-Danny Boy restaurant/taproom that was planned for the village as well?

  4. Why does the majority get to trample on the rights of the minority? You do realize that banning gay marriage does not rid the world of gay people, right? They are still going to be around and they are still going to continue to exist. The best way to get it all out of the spotlight? LEGALIZE IT! If gay marriage is legal, they will get to stop trying to push for it and you will get to stop seeing it all over the news. Why do Christians get to decide what is moral?? Why do you get to push your religion on others? How would legalizing gay marriage expose their lifestyle to your children? By the way, their lifestyle is going to continue whether gay marriage is legalized or not. It's been legal in Canada for quite a while now and they seem to be doing just fine. What about actual rules handed down by God? What about not working on Sundays? What about obeying your parents? What about adultery? These are in the 10 Commandments, the most important of God's rules. Yet they are all perfectly legal. What about divorce? Only God is allowed to dissolve a marriage so why don't you work hard to get divorce banned? Why do you get to pick and choose the parts of the Bible you care about?

  5. Look at the bright side. With the new Lowe's call center, that means 1000 jobs at $10 bucks an hour. IMS has to be drooling over all that disposable income. If those employees can save all their extra money after bills, in five years they can go to the race LIVE. Can you say attendance boost?

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