Circle may close to cars for Super Bowl week

February 7, 2011
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It’s the day after.

The day after Super Bowl Sunday.

It’s go time for members of Indianapolis’ 2012 Super Bowl Host Committee.

“On Monday, all eyes will turn to Indianapolis,” Mayor Greg Ballard said in Dallas Friday. “We’ll be on the clock.”

About 70 host committee, city and state officials were in Dallas last week, and they’ll be taking a few days this week to “download information” about what they learned,” said Host Committee Chairman Mark Miles.

They aren’t wasting any time. Actually, the host committee has been in high gear for quite a while. But Host Committee CEO Allison Melangton told IBJ last week, that it’s time to kick it up a notch.

Melangton and Miles are working on a whole batch of initiatives, not the least of which is a comprehensive plan to deal with the weather. More on that in two weeks, Miles said.

Melangton is also trying to raise money, though she wouldn’t say how much, for a major entertainment endeavor on Monument Circle in the week-long run-up to the Super Bowl next February.

Melangton said it was a little premature to divulge too many details, but did say that the event would be held on multiple nights, maybe even nightly, and that the Circle would be closed to vehicular traffic and turned into a pedestrian mall. Sources close to the organizers said a music component could be a part of the festivities. Melangton hopes to have details of the event nailed down in a month or so.

Melangton was also busy last week arranging for the folks from the Dallas host committee to come to Indianapolis near the end of this month, to help teach Indianapolis officials what they learned during this year’s Super Bowl.

That may seem odd considering Dallas and Indianapolis could be competing for future Super Bowls. Officials from both cities have said they’d like to get on a regular rotation as Super Bowl hosts alongside Miami and New Orleans.

But NFL sources said officials from Dallas and Indianapolis have forged a first-of-its kind alliance to share information about Super Bowl host city operations. As part of that alliance, Ballard spent part of Friday meeting with Dallas mayor Tom Leppert and other city officials.

“We know how difficult this job is; we understand well the surprises that can come with hosting a Super Bowl,” said Tony Fay, vice president of Dallas’ host committee. “We also know how amazing an opportunity it is for a city to host a worldwide event like a Super Bowl, so we’re eager to help Indianapolis any way we can.”

Part of Dallas' eagerness to help may have to do with Dallas’ desire to host the NCAA Final Four at Cowboys Stadium, and its interest in tapping into Indianapolis officials’ knowledge from regularly hosting that event.

Still, Miles said, the help is welcome.

“I think there is a special relationship between Dallas’ host committee and ours,” Miles said. “Operationally and financially, we think this relationship and these meetings are really going to help us. We hope to take any surprises out of the equation of hosting this event.”
 

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  • Save the National Anthem
    I certainly hope the Indy Super Bowl committee will learn from screeching, off key, forget the lyrics slaughter of the national anthem by Christine Aguillera and have a real vocalist sing at Lucas Oil Stadium. Indiana's own terrific soprano, Angela Brown, would be an excellent choice to show the world how our nation's anthem should be sung.
  • Anthem
    I agree with SteveR. There is one national anthem with one melody. I have never heard anyone distort/destroy "Oh Canada","God Save the Queen" or "La Marseillaise," have you? Why only in America?
  • NFL Controls The Anthem
    The Host Committee will not pick the National Anthem singer ... the NFL makes all entertainment decisions.
  • Adam's right
    The NFL controls soooo much during the Super Bowl and why shouldn't they, it is their show. They will pretty much be running the entire show and the Indy folks will act mostly as "the help".
  • Outdoor concerts in January?
    Don't think an outdoor concert will be well attended in January.

    They should maximize entertainment options for indoor venues and pipe recorded music outdoors to keep an upbeat vibe to the city for those unfortunate people who will be outdoors instead of enclosed walkways.

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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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